freedom works

Keep your chin up during the toughest of times, and you will soon experience the greatest times of your life. Keep going.
—  Nicole Addison @thepowerwithin
3

“I’d rather be a poor master than a rich servant.” says really rich actor with an estimate net wealth of $75 million.

10

Soldiers’ Angels
“Their courage cannot be matched. Their Loyalty to Protect our Country is amazing. They fight to protect the Freedom of Americans they have never met. Many have fallen along this journey; they are the Heroes that are engraved in my soul. It is in pure humility that I salute them.” ~Derek Clark

how to combat pinkwashing at pride (aka: why slapping a rainbow on everything isn’t good enough)

banks:

- create initiatives that help low-income lgbt people access banking services.

- stop allowing donations to anti-lgbt hate groups, the kkk, and other hate groups that target lgbt people.

- donate money homeless shelters and local organizations that work to eliminate lgbt poverty.

- ensure lgbt employees have access to health insurance and liveable wages.


alcohol companies:

- stop the showing of advertisements that portray binge drinking as healthy

- donate to local lgbt friendly addiction services

- start a program that teaches lgbt inclusive health services for local community organizations that deal with addiction treatment

- work in collaboration with nightclubs and bars to promote “panic buttons” in washrooms, as well as other methods of keeping lgbt patrons safe

- remove sponsorship from events and companies that are known for not being lgbt inclusive


politicians:

- be a part of a political party that actively advocates for the rights and freedoms of lgbt people.

- work in collaboration with local governments to advocate for lgbt rights

- listen to the lived experiences of lgbt people and do not speak over them, or consider your input more valid than theirs

- vote for bills that help lgbt people, vote against those which hinder our freedoms and safety

- do not accept donations from people or organizations that campaign against lgbt rights.


everyone:

- do not hand out promotional material at pride parades unless the information directly benefits the lgbt community specifically.

- do not use the platform of pride to advertise at all, unless doing so would specifically benefit lgbt people.

- do not treat pride like a party; it is, and has always been, a protest and a show of resiliency.

- do NOT create initiatives and events that cater only to white, able-bodied, cisgender gay men. inclusivity means ALL lgbt people are welcomed and heard.

- use your position as a straight ally to ELEVATE the voices of the lgbt community, but do not speak over them. do not tell them what they want or need. trust me, they know better than you do.


when someone says “well would you just prefer we go back to when everyone was homophobic?” you can say “no, i’d prefer that corporations and politicians do MORE than painting a rainbow sign and dancing with feather boas, and here is how they can start.”

Steps to Letting go of Painful Memories

Experiences can leave us with some painful memories. They tie us to the past and prevent us moving on. And the only way to freedom is to work on letting go – so these memories don’t haunt us or keep us trapped in pain. Below are some guidelines to help you work on this.

1. Before you can let go, you must face whatever happened and accept that it is part of your past experiences. Suppression doesn’t work as a long-term solution. It can only be a band aid that brings temporary relief. Talk to someone you trust, or write about it in your journal. You need to share what has happened, in order to move on.

2. Identify the lessons you have learned from what has happened. There’s always a lesson – so look for what you’ve learned. It doesn’t make it better – but it does lessen its power.

3. Write the lesson down on a piece of paper and repeat it to yourself when you’re hit by painful memories. For example, if you’ve been scarred by abuse, then you might write something like: “My experience of abuse does not determine who I am. I’m a stronger person now, and that is not my destiny. I’m choosing my own future, and the person I will be.”

4. Repeat this mantra often so it takes root in your mind. Allow it to be stronger than the bad experience. Say it often – till you mean it– then you’ll start to feel you’re freer. Persevere and keep on fighting when the old memories return.

5. Seek to be a person who’s a peace with themselves. When peace is your focus, old thoughts and memories have much less power over how you think and feel. However, seeking after peace must be a conscious, constant choice.

6. When the past tries to intrude focus firmly on the present. Ground yourself in what’s happening around you in the room, and try to breathe deeply - and deliberately relax. You are here in this moment; you’re not living in the past.

7. Forgive – for your own sake. Try to heal from what happened – then let resentments go. You don’t want them in your life for they’ll just tie you to the past. You may need some help with this – but it is worth the daily struggle. It is a powerful tool for moving forward, and being free.

Braved D.W. to listen to Niall on the podcast.

– Initially he told the producer he wanted to pull back on ‘Slow Hands’ because he thought it was getting too wild/funky. The song is ‘a sexy one’ with a 70s/80s vibe. Has a big riff/electronic guitar moment. Niall said it basically took on a life’s of its own.

–Album is 50/50 split between uptempo and more stripped/guitar driven.

– Regarding the new label, wanted a fresh start and to see a different side of the industry. He has freedom to work at his pace, but he also has great support/backing in large numbers. Having a lot of fun.

– Anticipates all the guys will tour their solo music and that it will take about a year. No timestamp on 1D reunion. When the call comes, he will be there.

– Niall leaves it open that One Direction could possibly reunite as a trio after Dan wonders “what if one member decides not to return”. Says no one has discussed anything / no specific plans have been made. It’s too soon.

– Regarding Zayn rejoining the group, Niall said “the fans would love it” but reiterates that these conversations are just too premature.

– Group did not want to make Louis’ X Factor performance a media circus given the circumstances. Would have been cringy with pictures/PR. Kept things private. Highly emotional obviously. Said Louis was incredible. *sniff*

– SOTT is “very Harry”. He was listening to it before the podcast. Said Harry was genius on SNL. Very funny. His Jagger imitation was brilliant.

– The guys are still connected/try to stay updated with everyone’s moves and new music. Lives by Louis, has presents all picked out for Liam’s son and will probably see Harry record for James’ show.

– Unbelievable to watch James’ ascent on the Late Late show. Same with Ben. Going to the show feels like home. He gets his haircut there, lol.

– Not on Tinder. Online dating not for him. Usually gets set up / bumps into ppl at bars. Can be quite shy with the “odd butterflies”.

– Promo through May/June/July. Eager to get back to work. Got all the time off he wanted.

– James Blunt is favorite Twitter profile. Thinks Arianna Grande is genius on Snapchat with fans. Golf channel favorite TV. Traffic app is his fave. “oh God I live such an exciting life..golf and traffic.” lol

Steps for Letting Go of Painful Memories

Experiences can leave us with some painful memories. They tie us to the past and prevent us moving on. And the only way to freedom is to work on letting go – so these memories don’t haunt us or keep us trapped in pain. Below are some guidelines to help you work on this.

1. Before you can let go, you must face whatever happened and accept that it is part of your past experiences. Suppression doesn’t work as a long-term solution. It can only be a band aid that brings temporary relief. Talk to someone you trust, or write about it in your journal. You need to share what happened, in order to move on.

2. Identify the lessons you have learned from what has happened. There’s always a lesson – so look for what you’ve learned. It doesn’t make it better – but it does lessen its power.

3. Write the lesson down on a piece of paper and repeat it to yourself when you’re hit by old, painful memories. For example, if you’ve been scarred by abuse, then you might write something like: “My experience of abuse does not determine who I am. I’m a stronger person now, and that is not my destiny. I’m choosing my own future, and the person I will be.”

4. Repeat this mantra often so it takes root in your mind. Allow it to be stronger than the bad experience. Say it often, till you mean it, then you’ll start to feel you’re freer. Persevere and keep on fighting when those old memories return.

5. Seek to be a person who’s at peace with themselves. When peace is your focus, old thoughts and memories have much less power over how you think and feel. However, seeking after peace must be a conscious, constant choice.

6. When the past tries to intrude, focus firmly on the present. Ground yourself in what’s happening around you in the room, and try to breathe deeply - and deliberately relax. You are here in this moment; you’re not living in the past.

7. Forgive – for your own sake. Try to heal from what happened – then let resentments go. You don’t want them in your life for they’ll just tie you to the past. It’s not an ease process; it takes work and discipline. But it is worth the daily struggle - as one day you’ll be free.

Steps to Letting Go of Painful Memories

Experiences can leave us with some painful memories. They tie us to the past and prevent us moving on. And the only way to freedom is to work on letting go – so these memories don’t haunt us or keep us trapped in pain. Below are some guidelines to help you work on this.

1. Before you can let go, you must face whatever happened and accept that it is part of your past experiences. Suppression doesn’t work as a long-term solution. It can only be a band aid that brings temporary relief. Talk to someone you trust, or write about it in your journal. You need to share what happened, in order to move on.

2. Identify the lessons you have learned from what has happened. There’s always a lesson – so look for what you’ve learned. It doesn’t make it better – but it does lessen its power.

3. Write the lesson down on a piece of paper and repeat it to yourself when you’re hit by old, painful memories. For example, if you’ve been scarred by abuse, then you might write something like: “My experience of abuse does not determine who I am. I’m a stronger person now, and that is not my destiny. I’m choosing my own future, and the person I will be.”

4. Repeat this mantra often so it takes root in your mind. Allow it to be stronger than the bad experience. Say it often, till you mean it, then you’ll start to feel you’re freer. Persevere and keep on fighting when those old memories return.

5. Seek to be a person who’s a peace with themselves. When peace is your focus, old thoughts and memories have much less power over how you think and feel. However, seeking after peace must be a conscious, constant choice.

6. When the past tries to intrude, focus firmly on the present. Ground yourself in what’s happening around you in the room, and try to breathe deeply - and deliberately relax. You are here in this moment; you’re not living in the past.

7. Forgive – for your own sake. Try to heal from what happened – then let resentments go. You don’t want them in your life for they’ll just tie you to the past. It’s not an ease process; it takes work and discipline. But it is worth the daily struggle - as one day you’ll be free.