free university of new york

nytimes.com
What ‘Snowflakes’ Get Right About Free Speech
Campus protests against speakers like Richard Spencer are not censorship. They help secure the basic rights of those marginalized, transgender people included.
By Ulrich Baer

Ulrich Baer makes some very important points regarding free speech in the New York Times. The university protests against right wing extremists speaking on campus is not an attack on free speech. They represent a defense of free speech.

Free speech rests on respect for some common rules of engagement. When one group argues that it is in some way superior to another, the other group cannot take part in the debate on equal terms. 

If a fascist requires proof for the Holocaust, there is no point for a Holocaust surviver to provide such proof, as the fascist will dismiss all proof as lies. The fascist has already defined the survivor as a liar. The fascist is  invalidating the very life and existence of the Holocaust victim by denying the truth and value of his or her life. That is an act of violence, not an argument in a debate.

Indeed, as Jean Paul Sartre pointed out, the fascist will knowingly break the rules, because he is not searching for the truth, he is searching for power:

“Never believe that anti-Semites are completely unaware of the absurdity of their replies. They know that their remarks are frivolous, open to challenge. But they are amusing themselves, for it is their adversary who is obliged to use words responsibly, since he believes in words. The anti-Semites have the right to play.”

The concept of free speech and an open discussion requires a minimum of trust and a common understanding of what truth entails.

Bear uses transgender people as an example:

“The rights of transgender people for legal equality and protection against discrimination are a current example in a long history of such redefinitions. It is only when trans people are recognized as fully human, rather than as men and women in disguise, as Ben Carson, the current secretary of housing and urban development claims, that their rights can be fully recognized in policy decisions.

The idea of freedom of speech does not mean a blanket permission to say anything anybody thinks. It means balancing the inherent value of a given view with the obligation to ensure that other members of a given community can participate in discourse as fully recognized members of that community. Free-speech protections — not only but especially in universities, which aim to educate students in how to belong to various communities — should not mean that someone’s humanity, or their right to participate in political speech as political agents, can be freely attacked, demeaned or questioned.”

Read the whole article here.

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August 26th, 2015

Columbia is soooo pretty. I loved my tour of the univerisity.

What I liked: I liked how it’s in NYC and is a quick taxi ride to any local events. The university is also kind enough to offer freshmen single dorms. Our tour guide was also super entertaining.

What I disliked: The only turn off for me was the core curriculum, including a literature class that studies “The Odyssey”. This class is required for everyone. Since I already read the epic poem in middle school, I don’t want to go through it again…y'know?

Please feel free to shoot me an ask about anything Columbia!

Popcorn Love by KL Hughes

A prominent figure amongst New York City’s fashion elite, Elena Vega is a successful businesswoman and single mother to an adorable three-year-old son, Lucas. Her love life, however, is lacking, as those closest to her keep pointing out. At the persistent urging of her closest friend, Elena reluctantly agrees to a string of blind dates if she can find a suitable babysitter for Lucas. 

Enter Allison Sawyer, a free-spirited senior at New York University. 

Elena is intrigued by Allison’s ability to push her out of her element, and the young woman’s instant and easy connection with a normally shy Lucas quickly earns Allison the job. After each blind date, Elena returns home to complain to Allison about her lacking suitors. As they bond, Elena begins to realize that the person possessing all the qualities she most desires might just be the woman who has been in front of her the entire time. 

The vast difference between the two women’s social statuses, however, may be an obstacle not easily overcome.

Available now in paperback and digital formats!

Order your copy today! 

The papers of this artist were processed with funding from the National Public Historical Publications and Records Commission, part of the National Archives.

March is the birthday month of  Wanda Gág (1893–1946), American artist, author, translator and illustrator. She is most noted for writing and illustrating the children’s book Millions of Cats which won a Newbery Honor Award in 1928 and is still in print.

Wanda started out as a graphic arist, and her first solo exhibition was at the New York Public Library in 1923. A 1926 show  n New York’s Weyhe Gallery in 1926 led to her recognition as “one of America’s most promising young graphic artists” and the following year,  her article “These Modern Women: A Hotbed of Feminists” was published in The Nation. Her work continued to be shown in galleries, The Museum of Modern Art 1939 exhibition “Art in Our Time” and the 1939 New York World’s Fair “American Art Today” show.

But perhaps she is best remembered as a children’s book illustrator. In addition to Millions of Cats, she published 15 books, including her illustrated translation of Grimm’s fairy tales and Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

Some of Gág’s papers are held in the Kerlan Collection at the University of Minnesota, the New York Public Library, the Free Library of Philadelphia and the Minneapolis Institute of Art. Her childhood home in New Ulm, Minnesota has been restored and is now the Wanda Gág House, a museum and interpretive center which offers tours and educational programs

The NHPRC funded the processing of her papers at the University of Pennsylvania, some 40 boxes of materials. You can read the Finding Aid at http://dla.library.upenn.edu/dla/ead/ead.html?id=EAD_upenn_rbml_MsColl310

Whenever there’s a discussion about free tuition, it’s always disappointing how few people realize that tuition was free nationwide until recently. The 1862 Morrill Act established land grant universities on a free tuition basis across the nation. As federal and state funding dwindled, there were still hold outs, like New York State University circuit was free until the 60s, and University of California was free until the 80s.

And even then, prices have raised some 1,000% in the last four or so decades, outstripping the inflation of other costs, like 375% increase in housing costs.

My father went to the same school for the same degree less than two decades ago, his quarterly fees were some $40. If I had to pay tuition, it would be some $4,600 for the same time period.

People like @your-uncle-dave are living testament to how poor civics and social studies education is in the US. They think things are impossible because they have no context or background.

“A prominent figure amongst New York City’s fashion elite, Elena Vega is a successful businesswoman and single mother to an adorable three-year-old son, Lucas. Her love life, however, is lacking, as those closest to her keep pointing out.

At the persistent urging of her closest friend, Elena reluctantly agrees to a string of blind dates if she can find a suitable babysitter for Lucas.

Enter Allison Sawyer, a free-spirited senior at New York University.

Elena is intrigued by Allison’s ability to push her out of her element, and the young woman’s instant and easy connection with a normally shy Lucas quickly earns Allison the job.

After each blind date, Elena returns home to complain to Allison about her lacking suitors. As they bond, Elena begins to realize that the person possessing all the qualities she most desires might just be the woman who has been in front of her the entire time.

The vast difference between the two women’s social statuses, however, may be an obstacle not easily overcome.”

Free University of New York

Tomorrow is MayDay and as a part of the celebrations some CUNYs are joining forces to creat the Free University of New York in Madison Square Park.

I am too excited. I am going there tomorrow with my Carnival and the Caribbean class. We will be holding class outdoors in the park and inviting people to join us. ITS FOR EVERYONE!! Oh and believe me, I think that any person who is blessed enough to come into contact with the fabulous Dr. Kristy K. McMorris (Howard Alum, HU!) will be exponetially increased.

If anyone in NYC plans on going tomorrow I hope to see you there :) 

9

Pictures from the May Day: Free University of New York City 

I spent the day

  • Discussing the idea of oppression and politics within the context of Carnival with Prof. Kristy McMorris, 
  • Listening to a lecture on the Politics of Violence concerning MLK and Malcolm X, 
  • Watching a Mariachi band and Occupy Global procession make its way through the park in honor of the May Day General Strike. 

They need to do this again, this was a really interesting day of ideas and experiences melding together into something beautiful, something to aspire to, a world where education, interaction, and community have no limits.

anonymous asked:

hello, i am writing a research paper about porn, the porn industry, and its effects on people/behaviors... i haven't looked into it very much as the idea of porn itself makes me very uncomfortable but i do know a little about it and want to write a paper about the negatives of it. i was wondering if you knew of any resources i could look into that might help? thank you so much for your time! i hope i'm not bothering.

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