free speech movement

The fact that one of the few nations with free speech has a large movement that supports stopping free speech honestly makes my heart sink and I’m honestly not sure if anything, family, life, friends, nation, people, anything will matter if free speech is destroyed. If free speech dies, I will go with it.

Dec. 3, 2014

50 years ago today, Police arrested about 800 students at the University of California Berkeley Free Speech Movement rally. 

The students had taken over and staged a sit-in at the Sprout Hall Administration Building protesting the U.C. Regents’ decision to punish student activists for what many students saw as justified civil disobedience. 

One of those students, Mario Savio gave an impassioned speech in which he said, 

“There’s a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart that you can’t take part. And you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop!” 

Singer Joan Baez, only 23 at the time, sang “We Shall Overcome" 

“There’s a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious—makes you so sick at heart—that you can’t take part. You can’t even passively take part. And you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop. And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, to the people who own it that unless you’re free, the machine will be prevented from working at all.” 
― Mario Savio

There’s a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part! You can’t even passively take part! And you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels…upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop! And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, to the people who own it, that unless you’re free, the machine will be prevented from working at all!
latimes.com
How Berkeley became epicenter of violent Trump clashes
How Berkeley became epicenter of violent Trump clashes
By Paige St. John and Shelby Grad

The latest example of this came Saturday, when clashes between backers and critics of the president resulted in 21 arrests.

Berkeley is one of America’s most liberal cities, with a long history of left-wing activism. Trump supporters used the city as a setting for a Patriots Day rally Saturday.

But it goes beyond protests and counter-protests.

Why Berkeley?

For one thing, the city, along with Oakland and San Francisco, has a long-established protest culture. The UC Berkeley campus is famously known as the home of the Free Speech Movement. So when pro-Trump forces decided to rally there, plenty of counter-protesters were at the ready to respond.

Saturday’s event brought out a small but robust crowd of Trump supporters.

Stewart Rhodes, founder of the citizen militia group known as the Oath Keepers, said he came from Montana with about 50 others to protect Trump supporters. They were joined by bikers and others who vowed to fight members of an anti-fascist group if they crossed police barricades.

“I don’t mind hitting” the counter-demonstrators, Rhodes said. “In fact, I would kind of enjoy it.”

Having said that, there were violent clashes in Huntington Beach, a decidedly less liberal place, a few weeks ago.

Berkeley is also a potent symbol because of its role as the birthplace of the Free Speech Movement in 1964:

Before fall 1964, students’ politicking had been limited to a small sidewalk strip thought to be off-campus and immune from university restrictions. Students such as Mario Savio returned from searing experiences as civil rights workers in the South and sought to expand campaigns in California, upsetting some state legislators.

After learning that the property was owned by UC, school authorities moved to shut down the area and ban the tables and pamphleting there. Activists challenged the rules by resuming their activities. Three months of confrontations, demonstrations and negotiations followed and became international news. Eventually, the restrictions were lifted with some limitations — a victory that paved the way for later protests supporting women’s’ rights and environmentalism and opposing the Vietnam War.

Continue Reading … 

Phroyd

[FBI Director] Hoover instantly ordered a major investigation of the Free Speech Movement and assigned a lot of agents to look into it and whether it was a subversive plot. And they determined that while there were a few communists and socialists involved in the protest, it would have happened anyway, because it was really just a protest about this campus rule [a rule banning students from political engagement]. His agents repeatedly told [Hoover] that it would have happened anyway and it wasn’t a subversive plot, but Hoover ordered further investigation, and beyond that, dirty tricks to stifle dissent on the campus.

- Seth Rosenfeld on the FBI’s Interest in the Free Speech Movement 

There is a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part. You can’t even passively take part! And you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop! And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, to the people who own it — that unless you’re free, the machine will be prevented from working at all!
—  Mario Savio

There’s a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you cant take part, you can’t even passively take part, and you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop! And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, to the people who own it, that unless you’re free, the machine will be prevented from working at all!

-Mario Savio


4

Joan Baez 1963'te Berkeley Üniversitesi kampüsünde sansüre karşı çıkarak konuşma özgürlüğünü savunan Free Speech Movement'a katıldı. Bu eylem üniversitelerde Mayıs 1968'de doruk noktasına ulaşacak olan bir protesto dalgasının başlangıcıydı…

ve o kadın, folkun protest yüzü, bugün doğdu. doğum günü kutlu olsun!

-Selda

Free Speech Movement at UC Berkeley. 1964.

Thousands of students joined the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, gathering the administration building at the University of California campus, to protest four students being disciplined for distributing political literature.
The next day, police arrested 773 who began a sit-in at Sproul Hall. 10,000 more students then went on strike and shut down the school. The Free Speech Movement had began in October, when three thousand students surrounded a police car for 36 hours.