franklin-roosevelt

pugipugipugi43  asked:

James Cox and FDR ran on the same ticket in 1920(and lost badly), and FDR of course eventually was elected POTUS in 1932. I learned recently that Cox died on July 15, 1957, nearly a quarter century after Roosevelt defeated Hoover. Since you've read up on this shit as a historian I was wondering, are there any records of interactions made between Cox and Roosevelt after Roosevelt became president, or even when he was president-elect?

Governor Cox stayed active for most of the rest of his long life and campaigned for FDR in all four of Roosevelt’s Presidential campaigns. President Roosevelt also found various commissions or positions that he appointed Cox to, like sending him to the London Economic Conference as part of the American delegation in the early months of FDR’s term. I’d recommend checking out Cox’s autobiography A Journey Through My Years for more on his life and career.

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February 19th 1942: Japanese internment begins

On this day in 1942, US President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed executive order 9066 which allowed the military to relocate Japanese-Americans to internment camps. A climate of paranoia descended on the US following the attack on the naval base at Pearl Harbor by the Empire of Japan, which prompted the US to join the Second World War. Americans of Japanese ancestry became targets for persecution, as there were fears that they would collude with Japan and pose a national security threat. This came to a head with FDR’s executive order, which led to 120,000 Japanese-Americans being rounded up and held in camps. The constitutionality of the controversial measure was upheld by the Supreme Court in Korematsu v. United States (1944). Interned Americans suffered great material and personal hardship, with most people losing their property and some losing their lives to illness or the violence of camp sentries. The victims of internment and their families eventually received an official government apology in 1988 and reparations began in the 1990s. This dark episode of American history is often forgotten in the narrative of US involvement in the Second World War, but Japanese internment poses a stark reminder of the dangers of paranoia and scapegoating.

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President Franklin D. Roosevelt speaking in Syracuse at the New York Democratic State Convention in 1936.

FDR’s satirical rebuke against Republicans who opposed Social Security and the New Deal during the 1936 election.

80 years later the very same Republican Party used the same rhetoric unironically to justify taking away health insurance from 20 million Americans.

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December 7th 1941: Attack on Pearl Harbor

On this day in 1941, just before 8 am, the Imperial Japanese Navy launched an attack on the American naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. After decades of escalating tensions, primarily over Japanese aggression against China, and Japanese anger over American trade sanctions, the Japanese strike on America’s Pacific Fleet still came as a surprise. In a two hour assault, hundreds of Japanese fighter planes dropped bombs and torpedoes which killed around 2,400 American soldiers and sailors, while 20 naval vessels and 200 planes were destroyed. In contrast, the Japanese suffered just 64 fatalities. The Pearl Harbor attacks were part of a larger, co-ordinated assault against American territories in Guam and the Philippines, and parts of the British Empire. While the strike certainly damaged the Pacific Fleet, vitally important aircraft carriers were spared as they were away from the base, and shipyards remained intact, allowing for swift rebuilding. The next day, following a powerful speech, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked Congress to declare war on Japan. The legislature passed the war measure with only one dissenting vote, cast by pacifist Representative Jeannette Rankin of Montana. America’s declaration of war was immediately followed by further declarations by Japan’s Axis allies Germany and Italy against the United States. Two years in, despite initial isolationist neutrality, America was now involved in the Second World War. The entrance of the United States into the war marked a pivotal turning point in one of the bloodiest wars in human history, as the full might of the American military joined the Allied cause against the forces of Nazi Germany, fascist Italy, and imperial Japan.

“Yesterday, December 7th, 1941 - a date which will live in infamy - the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.”
- President Franklin D. Roosevelt to Congress

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75th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack

On the morning of Dec. 7,  1941, a Sunday, Japanese bombers flew across Oahu, Hawaii and began their assault.

The attack killed more than 2,300 people, nearly half of them on the battleship USS Arizona. More than 1,100 were injured. After the attack, President Franklin D. Roosevelt delivered a speech before Congress, calling Dec. 7 a “date which will live in infamy.” The U.S. declared war against Japan. (AP)

December 7, 2016, marks the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Photos: (from top) U.S. Navy/National Archives via Reuters, U.S. Navy/U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command via Reuters (3), U.S. Navy/National Archives via Reuters (2)

See more images of Pearl Harbor attack on Yahoo News

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Before 1939 no reigning British Monarch had ever set foot on American soil since America’s Independence in 1776. But that all changed when King George VI (the one that stutterer and has that movie kings speech made about him) was invited by FDR to visit. In hopes to win over the sympathy and support of the American people towards the UK for the inevitable war ahead. And it work Americans welcomed the royal couple heartily and came from all over to just get a glimpse of them. 

So I just wanted to draw the reserved slightly shy royal couple being unconformable and overwhelmed with the the american presidential overly friendly family’s big personalities.