francophone country

anonymous asked:

How do you have the discipline to keep up with your languages? I can't even do one

If I’m perfectly honest, there are many, many days where the discipline just isn’t there. And you know what? That’s okay - we’re human’s not robots after all.

Sometimes in the moment it’s difficult. Goals seem so far off. You’re in too deep but there’s still so much work to be done. Sometimes it would be easier to just stop.

Don’t stop. Take a break and reframe your outlook if you need to, but don’t stop.

Look at it this way - discipline is the product of a series of small actions that result in a tidal wave of change. It doesn’t need to be this grandiose thing. 10 minutes of study here, an hour there, or something in between.

Sure, there are going to be days where you really don’t want to do something. Take that chance to try something new. Tired of listening to the radio? Watch a YouTube video. Stuck on a grammar point? Write a poem using it. Get creative. Things will be challenging, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be fun.

However, if you’re finding yourself absolutely dreading a study session, maybe discipline isn’t the problem. Maybe there’s something going on in your life that’s preventing you from reaching your goals. Maybe you have the time, but you’re just too stressed to focus clearly. That’s okay! Take care of yourself first and foremost. This doesn’t mean you’re lacking discipline. It just means you’re taking a step back and working smarter.

In these types of situations, I like to revise the methods I’m using to achieve my goals so I can continue making progress whilst maintaining my sanity.

With French, I have this dream of living and working in a francophone country. To achieve this, I was studying for the B2, translating my CV into French, and immersing myself in the language as much as possible. Unfortunately due to a lot of things that are happening, it was difficult for me to continue pursuing French at the intensity that I wanted to while not completely breaking down.

My goal is still the same - working in a francophone country - but instead I’m postponing taking the B2 until next year and am focusing more on speaking and using the language in everyday situations. This will keep me in the habit of practising the language and allow me to continue making progress in an area I’m lacking in (speaking) while giving me the break that I need. When I start intensively studying again, I’ll have made a lot of progress, instilled good habits, and the process will be a lot more fun too.

I hope this was able to answer your question. If you want any specific tips or need advice with anything else, feel free to ask :)

3

The NY Times shared their ‘25 Best Films of the 21st Century’ list and asked Rob about Claire Denis’ movie 'White Material’ as he is set to work with the French director on 'High Life’.

From NY Times:

White Material
Directed by Claire Denis, 2010
The setting is an unnamed African country where Maria – played by a transcendent Isabelle Huppert – struggles to hold onto her family’s coffee plantation amid an escalating civil war. A fractured story about love, strength, the costs of white patrimony and the continuing ravages of postcolonialism, “White Material” finds the brilliant French director Claire Denis again in Africa, where she spent much of her childhood in Francophone countries. Here, the actor Robert Pattinson, an admirer of “White Material” and of Ms. Denis, answered a few questions by email about both put to him by Manohla Dargis.

How did you discover Claire Denis’s films?
Robert Pattinson: I saw “White Material” about seven years ago and she became an immediate favorite.

What specifically draws you to her work?

Rob: Watching the performances in her movies, you can just feel the freedom she gives her actors. She creates an entire world for them to behave in.

And I think having such wide parameters to capture things from means her movies can be built from an enormous amount of incremental details rather than a narrow narrative thrust. Her movies feel like waves building and breaking.

What does Isabelle Huppert bring to the character of Maria Vial?
Rob: She plays a character that seems to live steadfastly in her faith and imagination and yet still feels so human, accessible and raw.

Is Huppert our greatest living actress?
Rob: It’s difficult to think of someone who’s better.

(Rob has been seen in the theatre in London and New York when Huppert was starring in Phaedra last year. He’s not kidding when he says he thinks she’s the best.)

Le Clavier : The Keyboard

Here’s some info and vocab stuff about French keyboards. Attention! ‘French’ in this case means 'from France’; the keyboard is different in other Francophone countries.

First, the keyboard isn’t QWERTY it’s AZERTY and that makes it a bit weird to use at the beginning (especially the A). Second, almost all the symbols are in a different place. Here, look:

This is mostly annoying for the comma, which is where the US M is located.

Third, you have to press shift+[symbol] to get any number and shift+; to get a period/full stop. Other symbols, too, but these are the most inconvenient.

Next…

Vocab:

&         une esperluette
#         un dièse
'          une apostrophe
-          un trait d'union
—        un tiret
_         un tiret bas, underscore
@        une arobase
(          les parenthèses (f)
%        un (signe) pour-cent
!          un point d'exclamation
/          une barre oblique
?         un point d'interrogation
*          un astérisque
\          une barre oblique inverse
.          un point
,          une virgule
:          un deux-points
;          un point-virgule

Giving a website: (yes I realize you will probably never need to say 'http://’)

(ex) http://www.tumblr.com

h t t p deux-points barre oblique barre oblique trois w point tumblr point com

Giving your email address:

(ex): amateur_languager@mon-tumblr.com

a m a t e u r underscore l a n g u a g e r arobase mon trait d'union tumblr point com

anonymous asked:

I just read your post about France’s influence in Africa, and didn’t France aid the Hutus in their genocide of the Tutsis in Rwanda? all bc the Hutus remaining in power meant that Rwanda would remain a Francophone country and continue to have economic ties to France.

Oh my god, I didn’t know about that! But this doesn’t surprise me. France also intervened in the Nigerian Civil War and armed and trained the opposition group without officially publicizing their support of the Nigerian opposition party.

I just found this Newsweek article on France’s role in the Rwandan Genocide. Apparently, then French president Sarkozy “admitted” that France made “mistakes” during the war, and by “mistakes” it’s evident that France armed and supported the Hutus. 

What’s upsetting is that until you told me this information, I had no idea that France had been involved. When I learned about the Rwandan Genocide in middle school, not a single article, movie, documentary, or class lesson mentioned that France played a part in aiding the genocide of the Tutsis. 

But now, given this information and the things I’ve learned in class about the Francafrique policy, the connections are evident. The lengths to which the French will go to maintain the Francafrique policy and extract energy and resources from its former colonies in Africa are horrifying. 

French Food Vocab

Originally posted by slk-t

I’ve included both France/most francophone countries (fr.) and Quebec (can.) versions of most foods because I know the Quebec version better and it’s weird saying it any other way.

Breakfast

petit déjeuner - breakfast (fr. m)
déjeuner - breakfast (can. m)
café - coffee (m)
thé - tea (m)
pain grillé - toast (m)
bagel - bagel (m)
muffin - muffin (m)
beurre - butter (m)
beurre d’arachide - peanut butter (m)
confiture - jam (f)
céréales - cereal (fpl)
lait - milk (m)
jus - juice (m)
jus d’orange - orange juice (m)
jus de pomme - apple juice (m)
porridge - oatmeal (fr. m)
gruau - oatmeal (can. m)
fruits - fruit (mpl)

Lunch

déjeuner - lunch (fr. m)
dîner - lunch (can. m)
sandwich - sandwich (m)
soupe - soup (f)
légume - vegetable (m)

Dinner

dîner - dinner (fr. m)
souper - dinner (can. m)
poulet - chicken (m)
bœuf - beef (m)   
steak - steak (m)
dinde - turkey (f)
riz - rice (m)
pomme de terre - potato (f)
hamburger - hamburger (m)
pâtes - pasta (fpl)
fruits de mer - seafood (mpl)
homard - lobster (m)
saumon - salmon (m)
pizza - pizza (m)
aile - wings (m)

Verbs

manger - to eat
cuisiner - to cook
préparer - to prepare
cuire - to bake

Phrases

je voudrais… - I would like…
merci pour le repas - thank you for the meal
c’était très bon - it was very good

Let me know if there are any mistakes or better translations!!

averesentimenti  asked:

Hi there! I was wondering what kind of French classes you took/take (in school, outside of school, online, etc.) because I'm an anglophone who's been taking French in school for four years, but I'm nowhere near your skill level. Thanks :)

Prepare yourself because this is going to be a LONG post! 

So I started French almost three years ago at university and my first two years were just French 101, 102, 201, and 202 - the basic sequence at the college level. If you’re American, this roughly translates to four years of high school French. 

At the end of that, which was about a year ago, I had done extremely well in my classes but I still wasn’t happy with my level of French. I basically have my summers off, so I decided to spend that time really getting into French. I tried a LOT of techniques and some of my favorites can be found on my Masterpost, which I’ll reblog for you but which is also found on my homepage. 

One of the first things I did was improve my pronunciation with Introduction to French Phonology, which is produced by US government for soon-to-be diplomats heading to a francophone country. It’s very boring, but extraordinarily effective for helping with pronunciation. (It’s a public course, and you’ll need the textbook and the tapes - both can be found on the site I linked but if you google the title you’ll find it hosted in a lot of places.)

This was around the same time that I got more into Tumblr. On here, I started following a lot of francophones and people who blog quotes and writing in French. (search “citation” or “français” and you’ll find a lot). Every morning I got up, scrolled through my feed, and made a list of maybe 20-30 words I didn’t know and looked up the translations. I then made flashcards out of those words in Ankidroid, an flashcard app on Android (dunno if it’s on iOS) and reviewed them from time to time (maybe 4 times a week). 

Also on my phone I downloaded Memrise and started doing the course Advanced French (there are 3 parts) which introduced me to a lot of cool and useful words and phrases that are used commonly in France. There are other “Advanced French” courses on Memrise that are probably also good, but I can only vouch for that one personally. 

I wrote something small almost every day, either in my journal or as a private entry here on Tumblr. Sometimes, I submitted those things to Lang-8, where it would be corrected by native speakers. 

I watched a lot of movies and television shows in French - sometimes with subtitles, but I tried to do without when I could. There are millions of recommendations out there but I’ll highlight the following things: you can watch shows from Canal+ here (I like Le Petit Journal et Le Chiffroscope) and on Netflix there is a show called Les Revenants that is creepy but addicting. 

I also watched a lot of Youtube - some of my favorite channels for learning are Easy Languages - French, and silly things like Bref (a little more advanced) and Parole de Chat. The nice thing about Youtube (obviously) is they’ll give you a lot of recommendations in the sidebar and you’ll probably discover your own channels that you like. 

On Facebook, I started following a couple French news sources like Courrier International and Le Monde and I tried to read a couple articles every day. This is a pretty common tactic and it’s good, but try not to focus too much on news because I have found that everyday French and news French are pretty different. 

Books: I read Le Petit Prince on my Kindle and I downloaded some pdfs of books in French that are recommended as easy for non-native speakers. I also read the first Harry Potter in French (can’t find a link right now, but it’s floating around on line). The site FluentU does some good blog posts about books, and if you search “french edition” in the Kindle store you’ll find some kids books and stuff. 

When school started up again, I was in another intermediate level French class that kind of mixed literature and grammar/vocab. We read L’Etranger (not my favorite but pretty easy to understand and obviously a classic) and part of a book by Marc Levy called Le Voleur D’Ombres. That one is more modern and fairly easy to understand as well. 

I listened to a LOT of radio and podcasts. I walk to and from school and it’s about 2 miles, so I had a lot of time to listen! If you have a smartphone, download the TuneIn app and search “france”. Some of the my favorite channels for listening were RFI and France Inter - both do news and features with guest speakers, which is good because it will expose you to a lot of different accents and voices. Sometimes you’ll find you understand someone very well, and sometimes you won’t be able to understand a word, and it’s more based on the speaker than the content or level of French, so it’s very good experience. 

For podcasts, I liked Native French Speech (weekly conversations about different topics in French - usually something relating to France so you’ll also learn a lot about culture, history and geography) and News in Slow French, although for the whole content you have to pay and I’m not wild about that. Both are available on iTunes.

Lastly, I made a close friend this year who is French and there is no resource like having a native speaker friend. We have lunch at least once a week and we talk for an hour or maybe two in French, and we spent a week together on vacation and spoke in French about half the time. If you can find a way to have regular conversations with a native speaker, do it - but I don’t harp too much on this point because I have an incredibly hard time with new people and I know a lot of others do as well. It was just serendipitous that I made a good friend this year who is French.

To conclude, I’ll give some short and sweet advice:

French is a common language for Anglophones to be learning so there are a TON of class-type resources out there on the Internet and in bookstores. But honestly, they’re all at at a similar level, and you won’t necessarily advance very much with something like Living Language or LiveMocha if you already have an intermediate vocabulary, understand and can form all the verb tenses and know grammar decently well. That’s the level a lot of class sequences try to get you to. Same with Youtube channels titled things like “Learn French with so-and-so.” Many are fantastic for beginners, but in order to make the jump from intermediate to advanced, you have to just sink yourself into real spoken and written French as much as possible. (Note: I’m not at all familiar with your skill level but I assume you’ve spent the last four years focusing on grammar and vocab. If you’re still weak on those things, then Living Language tends to be a good resource as well as things like Duolingo.) 

I hope this helped! Please feel free to ask if you have any more questions. 

8

Élizabeth Tshala Muana Muidikayi aka Tshala Muana (nicknamed Queen of Mutuashi)

Tshala Muana was born in the Belgian Congo, Lubumbashi, May 13, 1958. Before she became known as the Queen of Mutuashi she began as a dancer.

Mutuashi is originally one of the dances/songs and rhythms of the Baluba of Congo. Tshala being Muluba herself was inspired by it and popularised the Mutuashi music style which was pioneered by Dr. Nico Kasanda. Tshala Muana wrote much of her own material and, unlike most Congolese musicians who sang in Lingala and created  rhumba and soukous music Tshala Muana preferred to incorporate the mutuashi rhythms and to sing in mother tongue Tshiluba (she also produce tracks where she sang in Lingala, French and Swahili whist still incorporating mutuashi rhythms)

Tshala Muana became popular in sub-Saharan Francophone African countries as well as Kenya and Tanzania.  

These are some of my favourite Tshala Muana songs (click on the link)

4

Twenty Years of African Cinema (1983) - dir. Férid Boughedir // Tunisia 

This survey of African film production is derived mainly from Francophone countries. It includes interview extracts with 8 directors including Hondo, Pipa, Ganda, Balogun, Cissé and Kaboré, and clips from 18 films featuring Xala, Ceddo, and The Chapel, and others from Cameroon, Ivory Coast and Niger.

Here’s some info and vocab stuff about French keyboards. Attention! ‘French’ in this case means 'from France’; the keyboard is different in other Francophone countries.

First, the keyboard isn’t QWERTY it’s AZERTY and that makes it a bit weird to use at the beginning (especially the A). Second, almost all the symbols are in a different place.

This is mostly annoying for the comma, which is where the US M is located.

Third, you have to press shift+[symbol] to get any number and shift+; to get a period/full stop. Other symbols, too, but these are the most inconvenient.

Next…

Some Vocab:

&         une esperluette
#         un dièse
'          une apostrophe
-          un trait d'union
—        un tiret
_         un tiret bas, underscore
@        une arobase
(          les parenthèses (f)
%        un (signe) pour-cent
!          un point d'exclamation
/          une barre oblique
?         un point d'interrogation
*          un astérisque
\          une barre oblique inverse
.          un point
,          une virgule
:          un deux-points
;          un point-virgule

Giving a website: (yes I realize you will probably never need to say 'http://’)

(ex) http://www.tumblr.com

h t t p deux-points barre oblique barre oblique trois w point tumblr point com

Giving your email address:

(ex): amateur_languager@mon-tumblr.com

a m a t e u r underscore l a n g u a g e r arobase mon trait d'union tumblr point com

French in revolutionary and post-revolutionary France

I got a couple of requests to write about this subject, so here you go!

So. French. Today it’s pretty much synonymous with France and vice versa. There are, of course, many francophone countries and regions in the world, but for many people, the two are inseparable. In France, just under 90% of the population are native French speakers and the rest are generally fluent. (Compare to the US, where 80% of the population speaks English at home and only ¾ of the remaining people are fluent in English).

French is the official language France, but although French dominates every aspect of the government today, this was not always true. It was only by the alienation of the many other languages spoken in France, that the French language was able to become synonymous with the state. The position of power in which French finds itself is the result of a long history of eliminating various other linguistic identities in France prior to the revolution in order to create a unique national identity. 

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