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Cia Ordelaffi 

Marzia Ordelaffi, born Marzia degli Ubaldini (21 June 1317 – 1381) was an Italian noblewoman and one of the most famous women warriors Italian history has ever known.

Marzia, who’s today most known simply by the diminutive Cia, was the daughter of Vanni Ubaldini da Susinana, an important signore of the Mugello, and his wife Andrea Pagani. She was married to the famous signore Francesco II Ordelaffi, lord of Forlì, also known as Francesco Ordelaffi il Grande.

Cia supported constantly his husband, who was a strong supporter of the Ghibelline cause. In May 1351 she intervened in the battle of Dovadona, saving her son, Lodovico Ordelaffi. In 1357, during the crusade promoted against Forlì and Francesco by the Pope through the papal legate Egidio Albornoz, Cia was invested by her devoted husband with Cesena’s military defence.

The anonymous Vita di Cola di Rienzo says of this episode: 

In Cesena staieva madonna Cia, la moglie dello capitanio de Forlì, con suoi nepoti e con granne forestaria drento dalla rocca. A questa madonna Cia lo capitanio scrisse una lettera. La lettera diceva così: “Cia, aiate bona e sollicita cura della citate de Cesena”. Madonna Cia respuse in questa forma: “Signore mio, piacciave de avere bona cura de Forlì, ca io averaio bona cura de Cesena”.

Cia and her brave yet ill-fated resistance against Cardinal Albornoz’ troops are still remembered and celebrated as an heroic act. The myth of the warrior signora was later perpetuated famously by Caterina Sforza, who defended with the same determination and misfortune the Rocca di Ravaldino in Forlì, always against the threat posed by the Papal forces.

Cia’s bravery is celebrated by the two most important Italian chroniclers of her time: the Anonimo Romano and Matteo Villani.


Something unusual, olishkanikolaevna, maybe you like it anyway…? To repay you for your wonderful Louise. <3

The message that everyone was expecting, that everyone was searching for in the depths of their souls, was none other than the tenderness of God: God who looks upon us with eyes full of love, who accepts our poverty, God who is in love with our smallness.
—  Pope Francis in his Christmas Midnight Mass homily