fractal math

Chaos Theory.

Chaos is the science of surprises, of the nonlinear and the unpredictable. It teaches us to expect the unexpected. While most traditional science deals with supposedly predictable phenomena like gravity, electricity, or chemical reactions, Chaos Theory deals with nonlinear things that are effectively impossible to predict or control, like turbulence, weather, the stock market, our brain states, and so on. These phenomena are often described by Fractal Mathematics, which captures the Infinite Complexity of Nature. Many natural objects exhibit Fractal Properties, including landscapes, clouds, trees, organs, rivers etc, and many of the systems in which we live exhibit Complex, Chaotic behavior. Recognizing the Chaotic, Fractal Nature of our world can give us new insight, power, and wisdom. 

Principles of Chaos

The Butterfly Effect: This effect grants the power to cause a hurricane in China to a butterfly flapping its wings in New Mexico. It may take a very long time, but the connection is real. If the butterfly had not flapped its wings at just the right point in space/time, the hurricane would not have happened. A more rigorous way to express this is that small changes in the initial conditions lead to drastic changes in the results. Our lives are an ongoing demonstration of this principle. 

Unpredictability: Because we can never know all the initial conditions of a complex system in sufficient (i.e. perfect) detail, we cannot hope to predict the ultimate fate of a complex system. Even slight errors in measuring the state of a system will be amplified dramatically, rendering any prediction useless. Since it is impossible to measure the effects of all the butterflies (etc) in the world, accurate long-range weather prediction will always remain impossible.

Order / Disorder: Chaos is not simply disorder. Chaos explores the transitions between order and disorder, which often occur in surprising ways.

Mixing: Turbulence ensures that two adjacent points in a complex system will eventually end up in very different positions after some time has elapsed. 

Fractals: A fractal is a never-ending pattern. Fractals are infinitely complex patterns that are self-similar across different scales. They are created by repeating a simple process over and over in an ongoing feedback loop. Driven by recursion, fractals are images of dynamic systems – the pictures of Chaos. Geometrically, they exist in between our familiar dimensions. Fractal patterns are extremely familiar, since nature is full of fractals. For instance: trees, rivers, coastlines, mountains, clouds, seashells, hurricanes, etc.

Koch Snowflake: Finite area, Infinite perimeter.

The Koch Snowflake has finite area but infinite perimeter… yeah that happens with fractals. This abstract curve requires an infinite process (depicted in the gif) to construct and is an example of a fractal–a mathematical set (usually a curve or geometric figure) which exhibits a repeating pattern that displays at every scale. (More about fractals here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractal)

But How? It seems clear that the area would be finite since the figure encloses a finite amount of space. To grasp why the Koch Snowflake has infinite perimeter, notice how as the iterations progress, the edges become more and more intricate. Now imagine trying to draw the edges with a pen. Since the construction of the snowflake continues indefinitely, the edges become infinitely intricate and you could never finish detailing these intricacies with your pen (that is the intuitive argument at least. I’ll leave the precise calculations up to you).

Fractals may seem so abstract and impractical but they actually have many useful real-world applications. For example, Benoit Mandelbrot (considered the “father of fractals”) found that stock market prices could be modeled with a factual curve. Check the wiki page for a long and diverse list of applications.

Fractal geometry may seem more abstract than traditional geometry but Mandelbrot argues that fractals are “the geometry of nature”. Objects in nature have random irregularities and are seemingly infinite in their intricacies. Attempting to incorporate this in drawings or animations is extremely difficult. Movie special effects and CGI often use fractals to make objects appear more natural looking. Since fractals can be made with mathematical formulae they are easy to generate with a computer. The first Star Wars movies were renowned for their special effects and were some of the first to use fractals to generate life-like explosions and landscapes of other worlds.

The Golden Ratio and Secret Geometry in Nature

These wonderfully symmetrical plants show the fractal nature of math, physics and the universe. Could this be evidence of sacred geometry? “Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.” -Albert Einstein

The Golden Ratio, or Fibonacci sequence, is everywhere. It can be found in ancient architecture, in some of the world’s most beloved artwork (such as the Mona Lisa), and most definitely in nature. It’s for this reason that the intriguing sequence, which begins as 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55 and so on forever, has fascinated mathematicians, scientists, designers, and artists for centuries. 

Leonardo DaVinci, for instance, was known to use the Fibonacci sequence in his masterpieces because the pattern is aesthetically pleasing. Is it a coincidence that the ratio can be seen from a micro to macro scale in all biological systems, and even in inanimate objects? Clearly, there’s much to learn about sacred geometry and inherent order in the universe. 

 Some theorize that the phi ratio (phi = 1.61803…) is evidence that nature is inherently perfect, and that when mankind strays away from the natural law, sickness and imbalance occur. While the Golden Ratio doesn’t account for every structure or pattern in this world and others, it most certainly is a key player.