fqhc

findahealthcenter.hrsa.gov
HRSA - Find a Health Center - Search Page

Hey! You! American person with no health insurance or inadequate health insurance!

Chances are you live near a FQHC - a Federally Qualified Health Center. These are clinics and health centers that get extra money for treating Medicaid patients for the purpose of using those extra dollars to provide care to the un-and-under-insured in their communities. The services are on a sliding fee scale dependent on your income. You might pay as little as $5 per visit. FQHCs offer complete, comprehensive care from checkups and preventative medicine to sick visits and mental health and substance abuse services. Just click the link to search for a center near you.

They are real doctor’s offices staffed by real doctors (and PA-Cs, midwives, NP’s, etc). Many have pharmacies with discounted drugs available. Many have emergency dental care.

It would be awesome if you guys could reblog this. I know there are a lot of people out there who don’t even know these kind of health centers exist, and you could help a follower out!

Community health centers compare well with private practices, researcher finds

Government-funded community health centers, which serve low-income and uninsured patients, provide better care than do private practices, a researcher at the Stanford University School of Medicine has found.

Randall Stafford, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, and colleagues at University of California-San Francisco looked at the actions physicians took when patients visited private practices versus the actions that were taken at community health centers, also referred to as Federally Qualified Health Centers and FQHC Look-Alikes, both of which receive government support.

Their study was published online July 10 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Stafford is the senior author.

The results of the study are particularly encouraging given that the Affordable Care Act, which the U.S. Supreme Court upheld June 28, depends on community health centers to provide services to previously uninsured patients.

Full article by MANDY ERICKSON at Stanford School of Medicine

An email I never sent regarding the misuse of tax dollars for medical education

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

To: ***********

From: Hector Parra

Subject: Re: *** Financial ***

Regarding FQHCs being the only clinics receiving Prop 1D equipment: I find this decision to be unethical.

The taxpayers approved bonds of “(a), the amount of two hundred million dollars ($200,000,000) [that] shall be used for capital improvements that expand and enhance medical education programs with an emphasis on telemedicine aimed at developing high-tech approaches to health care”. Dealing only with FQHCs denies not the original education goals of such funds, but it denies the communities they were designed to serve, particularly with intra-community concepts such as inter-clinic communication and clinic-satellite communication, e.g. clinics to schools. There is a wealth of medical education and research opportunities here. If a medical department can cover the IT costs to support such a deployment they should be allowed to use this equipment.

I understand there are faculty who wish to deploy this equipment specifically for medical education purposes. I explained that under current policies they won’t be able to use such equipment. I told them if they wanted to do so they should express this directly to the dean. HGPA

[The federal and state healthcare system, and everything involved in it, is broken. Likewise, you can’t give grant money to an entity that is also acting as a corporation. I quit a month later.]

We don't have "entry level" patients here.

NP residents frequently describe the presentation of the unknown, the complex, and/or the undifferentiated patient concerns (a routine part of primary care practice) as the greatest challenge they face and discuss examples such as these:

  • The ‘brief’ appointment for a chief complaint of 'bump on the leg’ that proved to be an aggressive cancer in an uninsured migrant farm worker
  • The 'late medication refill’ for a new pediatric patient who presented with a list of multiple co-morbidities and medications initiated elsewhere.
  • The crashing diabetic, newly homeless and contemplating suicide

These are the 'initial’ patients that appear in the schedule of every primary care provider in the nation’s federally qualified health centers, and who stand to reap enormous health benefits from the expert care of a nurse practitioner over time. Far from rare, these patients are in fact quite representative of the special populations served by health centers. All primary care providers must be ready, able, and trained to thoughtfully, completely, accurately, and compassionately establish a relationship; begin the process of differentiation, management, and treatment; work with a team to coordinate care; and assure that patients and families get the full benefit of prevention, health promotion, treatment, and management.

                                    -Margaret Flinter, PhD, APRN, c-FNP

GULP.

Bright Beacons for Health Care

Much of American health care’s future can be seen in two synergistic kinds of services in tiny, urban Rhode Island. One is Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). These facilities, set up around America, provide a wide range of free and insurance-subsidized clinical help for m…
Source:Bright Beacons for Health Care

Bright Beacons for Health Care

Much of American health care’s future can be seen in two synergistic kinds of services in tiny, urban Rhode Island.

One is Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs)
. These facilities, set up around America, provide a wide range of free and insurance-subsidized clinical help for millions of patients, most of them low-income.


The other is the burgeoning field of physician assistant education. Here I look at Johnson & Wales University’s spanking new Center for Physician Assistant Studies, in Providence. There are other such training centers cropping up around America. Indeed, Bryant University, in a Providence suburb, has a highly regarded one.


Consider the state’s biggest FQHC organization – Providence Community Health Centers (PCHC). Its teams of physicians and other clinicians, such as nurses and nurse practitioners, work for what is the biggest single provider of primary-care services in Providence, with more than 35,000 patients. (I toured PCHC’s immaculate Prairie Avenue campus the other week, led by Merrill Thomas, its CEO, and Jane Hayward, the Rhode Island Health Center Association’s president.)

PCHC ’s mission, it says, is to “provide neighborhood-based high quality and accessible primary medical care to improve the health status of the residents of Providence and surrounding communities regardless of their ability to pay.” FQHCs play especially important roles in inner cities and impoverished rural areas, such as Appalachia, where many physicians don’t want to practice, especially because of low reimbursement and so many difficult cases involving seemingly intractable behavioral-health issues.


Expanding primary care – especially preventive care – is essential if America is to improve overall health outcomes that are near the bottom of the Developed World while better controlling medical costs, which are the highest.

Whatever happens with the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. population’s aging (older means sicker); the daunting complexity of our health-insurance system; the permanent exit of many well-paying jobs; emigration to the United States of low-income people, and the decline of the stable, two-resident-parent family suggest that Federally Qualified Health Centers ought to play even bigger roles.

Of course, increasing the numbers of primary-care clinicians is essential for the long-term success of these clinics. Doing just that is the Johnson & Wales Center for Physician Assistant Studies, which has a beautiful building in Providence’s Jewelry District.

Its 24-month master’s program addresses the need to train many more non-physician clinicians who can perform highly professionally and cost-effectively some of the tasks now performed by over-worked (if highly paid) doctors. PAs are especially useful in getting patients to make the behavioral changes needed to prevent serious illness, in part because they can generally spend more time with patients than can physicians; many of the latter are more harried than ever because of onerous electronic-health-record duties and administrative pressures to boost patient volume.

J&W notes that PAs work in integrated medical teams to “provide diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health-care services.” (By the way, the differences between physician assistants and nurse practitioners mostly involve some education details. They’re very similar professions.

With physicians as supervisors, physician assistants take patients’ histories and perform exams; order lab tests; prescribe medications; diagnose illnesses; develop treatment plans, and counsel and educate patients.


No wonder that demand for PAs is surging. Forbes.com has listed Physician Assistant Studies as the “No. 1 Best Master’s Degree for Jobs.”

The American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA.org) says that “demand for physician assistants and nurse practitioners rose by more than 300 percent in the last three years.”

We’ll need PAs in droves in coming years as, technology, demographics and new cost controls continue to transform U.S. health care for all patients, especially in primary care, in which physician assistants will be at the forefront.

Last week we cruised the gorgeous Upper Connecticut River on a pontoon boat. Because it’s by far New England’s biggest river, on it you get a sense of what Mark Twain might have felt on the Mississippi. We yakked desultorily in the soft breeze about big projects we’d do - as if we were 30 years younger than we are.

Robert Whitcomb (rwhitcomb51@gmail.com), a former editor of these pages, is a partner in Cambridge Management Group , a healthcare-sector consultancy, a Fellow of the Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy, a former Providence Journal editorial-page editor and a former finance editor of the International Herald Tribune.

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Mid 2015

I got an email saying my tumblr turned 6 yrs old! That’s craziness but what is crazier is reading back. I feel like I’ve changed quite a bit for the better. I’m much more optimistic and less hard on myself - maybe less demanding. I think a few years ago I thought that if I was less demanding of myself, I’d be failing at the game of life but now I’m just fine with how much I get done in a day. I still make lists and schedule activities on my calendar but if I dont finish them or start them, there’s always tomorrow.

I’ve been working as an NP for the last 2.5 yrs in a FQHC and today I have on my calendar to apply to new NP jobs … no wonder I’m procrastinating on here. Expected and I’m fine with it. Compared to when I last wrote, I own a house in Philly with my wife (wife of all 50 states as of a few days ago thanks to SCOTUS decision). I’m completely in love with her and we have a pretty good life. We started a photography business about 6 months ago and we have 5 weddings to shoot this year! Amazing! We will also soon start trying for kids - I’m sure that will bring its own challenges. 

In general life is great and I’m happy. Excited to see where I’m at in another year. 

Current things on my to-do list: 

-apply for a job
-study russian 
-make a wedding album
-create “Kids in Fountains” 
-paint the 3rd floor
-call the roofer or our leaking deck 

Better get on it! :) 

Bright Beacons for Health Care

Much of American health care’s future can be seen in two synergistic kinds of services in tiny, urban Rhode Island. One is Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). These facilities, set up around America, provide a wide range of free and i…
Source: Bright Beacons for Health Care

Bright Beacons for Health Care

Much of American health care’s future can be seen in two synergistic kinds of services in tiny, urban Rhode Island. One is Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs). These facilities, set up around America, provide a wide range of free and i…
Source: Bright Beacons for Health Care