four valleys

4

On the twelfth day of Christmas, Studio Ghibli gave to me twelve ohmu’s a'singing

William Regal, Danny Basham, Rob Conway, Eugene, and Doug Basham
[April 3th, 2005]

An interesting candid shot taken backstage at WrestleMania 21. William Regal poses with four Ohio Valley Wrestling alumns prior to the Raw Vs. SmackDown battle royal, hence the representative t-shirts. Four of the five men pictured are former OVW Heavyweight Champions.

9

So I have audiobooks and I wanted a better album cover for it on iTunes.

Sherlock Holmes Books + BBC Sherlock

5

Ancient Worlds - BBC Two

Episode 6 “City of Man, City of God”

Palmyra was one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world. Located in an oasis in the Syrian desert, it was a vital caravan stop for travellers crossing the desert. Palmyra grew steadily in importance as a city on the trade route linking Persia, India and China with the Roman Empire -it was made part of the Roman province of Syria in the mid-first century AD-. In 129, Palmyra was visited by emperor Hadrian, who granted it the status of a free city.

Palmyra exerted a decisive influence on the evolution of neoclassical architecture and modern urbanization, uniting the forms of Graeco-Roman art with indigenous elements and Persian influeces. Unique creations came into existence, notably in the domain of funerary sculpture.

Outside the ancient walls, along the four main access roads to the city, stood four cemeteries, Valley of the Tombs, which feature different types of tomb. The oldest and most distinctive group is represented by the funerary towers, tall multi-storey sandstone buildings belonging to the richest families. Some towers had four storeys and could accommodate up to 300 sarcophagi.

Valley of the Tombs, Palmyra -Tadmur- Syria

Naruto Fic Masterlist

One-shots

Stay

Promise

Absolution

Poems I Do Not Write

Second Son

Back to the Beginning

Fever

Phantom Pain

Hush

The Colors of Midnight

On the Road to Snow


Multi-chapters

Providence: Chapter One

Providence: Chapter Two

The Missing-Nin: Prologue

The Missing-Nin: Chapter One

Children of War: Chapter One

Children of War: Chapter Two

Children of War: Chapter Three

For Everything There is a Season: Prologue

For Everything There is a Season: Chapter One

For Everything There is a Season: Chapter Two

For Everything There is a Season: Chapter Three

I Carry Your Heart: Part One

I Carry Your Heart: Part Two

East of the Sun: Part 1

East of the Sun: Part 2

Louder than Words: 1

Louder than Words: 2

An Irrevocable Condition: 1

An Irrevocable Condition: 2

An Irrevocable Condition: 3

An Irrevocable Condition: 4

An Irrevocable Condition: 5

An Irrevocable Condition: 6

The Valley of the End: Chapter One

The Valley of the End: Chapter Two

The Valley of the End: Chapter Three

The Valley of the End: Chapter Four

The Valley of the End: Chapter Five

The Valley of the End: Chapter Six

The Valley of the End: Chapter Seven

The Valley of the End: Chapter Eight

The Valley of the End: Chapter Nine

The Valley of the End: Chapter Ten

In Times of Peace: Chapter One

In Times of Peace: Chapter Two

In Times of Peace: Chapter Three

In Times of Peace: Chapter Four

In Times of Peace: Chapter Five

In Times of Peace: Chapter Six

In Times of Peace: Chapter Seven

In Times of Peace: Chapter Eight

In Times of Peace: Chapter Nine

In Times of Peace: Chapter Ten

In Times of Peace: Chapter Eleven

In Times of Peace: Chapter Twelve

In Times of Peace: Chapter Thirteen

In Times of Peace: Chapter Fourteen

In Times of Peace: Chapter Fifteen 

Intro To Cahokia

The Mississippian culture existed from 700 CE to 1350 CE, and its most famous city is Cahokia. Located in the Mississippi River valley about four miles from what is today St. Louis, the city has been under excavation since the mid-1900s. Here’s the facts to make you sound smart at the next mixer or office party.

  • Cahokia’s population, estimated at between 10,000 and 25,000, probably peaked between 1000 and 1100 CE.
  • it was surrounded by a wooden palisade, 13 to 15 feet high and 2.4 miles long
  • corn agriculture was introduced to the area around 750 CE, and fed the city’s population
  • there are at least 12o mounds, which were both for ceremonies and graves
  • one is Monks Mound, the largest earthwork north of Mexico, rises 100 feet and consisting of four terraces that covered 14 acres and contained an estimated 22 million cubic feet of earth
  • human sacrifices were found in many mounds, along with the elaborate grave of a ruler or priest (or ruler/priest, historians aren’t too sure about these things)
  • Cahokia declined likely due to environmental strain – the growing population used up too much wood from the surrounding forests and the satellite settlements that sprung up nearby meant the region could no longer feed the population.
  • by 1350, Cahokia was abandoned