Reasons why other people want a time machine I could meet Shakespeare and discuss his plays with him! I could watch Leonardo Da Vinci paint Mona Lisa! I could go back to the roaring twenties and throw amazing parties, like in The Great Gatsby!

Reasons why I want a time machine: I would go back to the 18th century and make the founding fathers read all the fanfiction to see how they would react

Founding Fathers age comparison.

In 1776, Benjamin Franklin was 70, George Washington was 44, John Adams was 41, Thomas Jefferson was 33, John Jay was 31, James Madison was 25, Alexander Hamilton was 21 and James Monroe was 18. 

Okay let’s talk about this painting. It’s called “Signing of the Constitution” by Howard Chandler Christy.

Let’s start with good old George Washington.

He’s staring dramatically into the distance with this heavenly glow thing going on.

William Blount is just looking longingly at Washington, like he’s desperate to confess his love.

Then Gunning Bedford, Jr. is down here on the floor like a weirdo.

George Read looks like he shit his pants and doesn’t know what to do.

Gouverneur Morris looks pissed. Also, it’s important that you know that Gouverneur was his first name, not his title.

William Jackson is obviously just asking for another drink. He can’t be bothered to pay attention to this historic event.

Roger Sherman is giving William Samuel Johnson some serious side-eye. Throwing some shade ‘bout some shit.

And my personal favorite: Ben Franklin looking directly at the camera like he’s Jim from The Office.

Probably because fucking Alexander Hamilton is all up in his personal space.

The Framers [of the Constitution] were cynical about the future of democracy. They studied failed democracies like Greece and Rome. They read Demosthenes. They designed a Constitution on the assumption that democracy might well deteriorate into demagoguery, and they created these complicated systems in order to filter the will of the people from being directly expressed. So all of these new media technologies – the idea of presidents tweeting directly to the people would’ve appalled [James] Madison, who thought direct communication between representatives and the people was the main potential source of tyranny, to be avoided. All of these filtering mechanisms are being undermined by technology, by reforms over the years, by the growing populist forces that are sweeping the world, and maintaining these Madisonian values in the face of these populist forces is something that liberals and conservatives increasingly should converge around.
—  Jeffrey Rosen, President of the National Constitution Center, with Terry Gross