forfarshire

Open Access Archaeology Digest #664

Today’s list of Open Access (free to read) articles:

Sketch of the History of Architecture in Scotland, Ecclesiastical and Secular
http://bit.ly/10BPuNI

Old Windmills in Scotland, with Special Reference to the Windmill Tower at Dunbarney, Perthshire.
http://bit.ly/YwCSWO

Notice of the Discovery of a Pict’s House at Fithie, in the Parish of Farnell, Forfarshire, in which Roman Pottery and Animal Remains were found.
http://bit.ly/10GJXFF

Learn more about Open Access and Archaeology at: http://bit.ly/YHuyFK

Today in 1746 James Reid was hanged, drawn, and quartered at York. He had served as a piper in the 1st Battalion, Lord Ogilvy’s (Forfarshire) Regiment, raised in October 1745 in support of the Young Pretender, Prince Charles Edward Stewart. He was among several men from this regiment left as part of the garrison of the English border city of Carlisle when the Jacobites  abandoned their invasion of England, and was captured when the city surrendered to government forces in December 1745. At his treason trial  it was put forward in his defence that, as a musician, he did not carry arms and had not struck a blow against the Government. However the court ruled that “...a Highland regiment never marched without a piper, and therefore his bagpipe, in the eyes of the law, was an instrument of war.”.   The pipes in the picture were played at Culloden in 1746 and are on display at the National Museum of Scotland 

Grace Darling (1815–1842), and Her Father William Darling (d.1865), Save the Survivors from the Wreck of the Steamer ‘Forfarshire’ on the Farne Rocks, 7 September 1838
by William Bell Scott

National Trust
Date painted: 1860
Oil on canvas, 185.5 x 185.5 cm