for want of a screw

My predictions for the next big Caryl dialog:

Carol: Something’s happening, right?
Daryl: Yeah. Out there. Past the thing.
Carol: We got this
Daryl: Someone has to get it
Carol: You good?
Daryl: *shoulder shrug*
Carol: There’s gonna be stuff, you know?
Daryl: Always gonna be stuff. Ain’t new.

*Insert brief but sweet hug*

*End scene.*

Bonus content on the cutting room floor:

Carol: The fuck did we just say?
Daryl: Hell if I know. Wanna screw around after this?
Carol: Thought you’d never ask.

“When I was 17 and heading off to the Naval Academy ...”

- Red Reddington, S05E04

*Me, an intellectual who did some research years ago on the Naval Academy, Red, what he did during his training and what it means for the timeline*:

Flashback to my essey on Ramond Reddington

The eligibility requirements are:

-          you have to be an United States citizen

-          you must be of good moral character

-          you have to be at least 17 and not past your 23rd birthday

-          you are not allowed to be married

-          you may not have a child or dependents

Uhu, yes, alright.

Wait … what did Ressler say during the glorious first season?

Thank you, Donald.

Originally posted by maths-and-books

Now he probably graduated at the age of 21, which would actually be remarkable, other than graduating with 24. That gives him more time to do stuff like: be a spy, meet Katarina, getting married. Screw continuity.

There is no plan. Face it. There is. no big. plan.

They roll with it, there is no point in doing theories when we don’t have clues we can count on.

Maybe there are two Reds. Maybe there are three, maybe there is none and it’s all in Liz head.

the biggest challenge of KHUX isn’t the difficulty, it’s being forced to choose between an avatar board for the skill vs an avatar board for the aesthetic

anonymous asked:

I hope you go back to writing what you actually want to write. Screw the haters it isn’t your fault that they can’t see aged up characters as adults they are the ones with the problem not you :)

Bless you, angel x

Hot damn, that trailer screwed me over. I was pretty content living in my cautious world where I hoped, but knew that if it didn’t happen I would be cool with it.

Now though, after seeing a week of excitement and speculation (that same level of fun that we had during the first months after TFA), I’m screwed over. I don’t want to jinx it. I don’t want to get too attached, but it’s too late. That hand outreach and the parallels between Kylo and Rey throughout the trailer have condemned me.

Damn it, Rian.

anonymous asked:

Ok story time, slightly NSFW but only slightly. My EX was kinda a dick. looking back i should have know since i was by his own admission a rebound girl because the girl he actually liked was dating someone and the were expecting. We were together almost a year and in that time he: Got mad i wasn't feminine enough, told me to wear more dresses and complained that i wouldn't let him get far enough when making out. I finally give in and give him a blow job and he breaks it off a week later.

Your ex is, pardon my French, a dick. Screw him you can wear whatever you want because it’s your choice just like how you didn't’t want to ‘go far’ while making out. Considering that he’s your ex, I hope that you are doing better now and sending hugs your way. (:

The Dos and Don’ts of Beginning a Novel:  An Illustrated Guide

I’ve had a lot of asks lately for how to begin a book (or how not to), so here’s a post on my general rules of thumb for story openers and first chapters!  

Please note, these are incredibly broad generalizations;  if you think an opener is right for you, and your beta readers like it, there’s a good chance it’s A-OK.  When it comes to writing, one size does not fit all.  (Also note that this is for serious writers who are interested in improving their craft and/or professional publication, so kindly refrain from the obligatory handful of comments saying “umm, screw this, write however you want!!”)

So without further ado, let’s jump into it!

Don’t: 

1.  Open with a dream. 

“Just when Mary Sue was sure she’d disappear down the gullet of the monstrous, winged pig, she woke up bathed in sweat in her own bedroom.”

What?  So that entire winged pig confrontation took place in a dream and amounts to nothing?  I feel so cheated! 

Okay, not too many people open their novels with monstrous swine, but you get the idea:  false openings of any kind tend to make the reader feel as though you’ve wasted their time, and don’t usually jump into more meaty action of the story quickly enough.  It makes your opening feel lethargic and can leave your audience yawning.

Speaking of… 

2.  Open with a character waking up.  

This feels familiar to most of us, but unless your character is waking up to a zombie attack or an alien invasion, it’s generally a pretty easy recipe to get your story to drag.

No one picks a book to hear how your character brushes their teeth in the morning or what they’d like to have for dinner.  As a general rule of thumb, we read to explore things we wouldn’t otherwise get to experience.  And cussing out the alarm clock is not one of them.  

Granted, there are exceptions if your writing is exceptionally engaging, but in most cases it just sets a slow pace that will bore you and your reader to death and probably cause you to lose interest in your book within the first ten pages.  

3.  Bombard with exposition.  

Literary characters aren’t DeviantArt OCs.  And the best way to convey a character is not, in my experience, to devote the first ten pages to describing their physical appearance, personality, and backstory.  Develop your characters, and make sure their fully fleshed out – my tips on how to do so here – but you don’t need to dump all that on the reader before they have any reason to care about them.  Let the reader get to know the character gradually, learn about them, and fall in love with them as they would a person:  a little bit at a time.   

This is iffy when world building is involved, but even then it works best when the delivery feels organic and in tune with the book’s overall tone.  Think the opening of the Hobbit or Good Omens.

4.  Take yourself too seriously.

Your opener (and your novel in general) doesn’t need to be intellectually pretentious, nor is intellectual pretense the hallmark of good literature.  Good literature is, generally speaking, engaging, well-written, and enjoyable.  That’s it.  

So don’t concern yourself with creating a poetic masterpiece of an opening line/first chapter.  Just make one that’s – you guessed it – engaging, well-written, and enjoyable. 

5.  Be unintentionally hilarious.

Utilizing humor in your opening line is awesome, but check yourself to make sure your readers aren’t laughing for all the wrong reasons (this is another reason why betas are important.)  

These examples of the worst opening lines in published literature will show you what I mean – and possibly serve as a pleasant confidence booster as well: 

“As the dark and mysterious stranger approached, Angela bit her lip anxiously, hoping with every nerve, cell, and fiber of her being that this would be the one man who would understand – who would take her away from all this – and who would not just squeeze her boob and make a loud honking noise, as all the others had.”

– Ali Kawashima

“She sipped her latte gracefully, unaware of the milk foam droplets building on her mustache, which was not the peachy-fine baby fuzz that Nordic girls might have, but a really dense, dark, hirsute lip-lining row of fur common to southern Mediterranean ladies nearing menopause, and winked at the obviously charmed Spaniard at the next table.”

– Jeanne Villa

“As I gardened, gazing towards the autumnal sky, I longed to run my finger through the trail of mucus left by a single speckled slug – innocuously thrusting past my rhododendrons – and in feeling that warm slime, be swept back to planet Alderon, back into the tentacles of the alien who loved me.”

– Mary E. Patrick

“Before they met, his heart was a frozen block of ice, scarred by the skate blades of broken relationships, then she came along and like a beautiful Zamboni flooded his heart with warmth, scraped away the ugly slushy bits, and dumped them in the empty parking lot of his soul.”

– Howie McClennon

If these can get published, so can you.

Do:

1.  You know that one really interesting scene you’re itching to write?  Start with that.

Momentum is an important thing in storytelling.  If you set a fast, infectious beat, you and your reader will be itching to dance along with it.  

Similarly, slow, drowsy openers tend to lead to slow, drowsy stories that will put you both to sleep.

I see a lot of posts joking about “that awkward moment when you sit down to write but don’t know how to get to that one scene you actually wanted to write about.”  Write that scene!  If it’s at all possible, start off with it.  If not, there are still ways you can build your story around the scenes you actually want to write.

Keep in mind:  if you’re bored, your reader will almost certainly be bored as well.  So write what you want to write.  Write what makes you excited.  Don’t hold off until later, when it “really gets good.”  Odds are, the reader will not wait around that long, and you’re way more likely to become disillusioned with your story and quit.  If a scene is dragging, cut it out.  Burn bridges, find a way around.  Live, dammit. 

2.  Engage the reader.

There are several ways to go about this.  You can use wit and levity, you can present a question, and you can immerse the reader into the world you’ve created.  Just remember to do so with subtlety, and don’t try too hard;  believe me, it shows.  

Here are some of my personal favorite examples of engaging opening lines: 

“In the beginning, the universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move." 

– Douglas Adams, the Restaurant at the End of the Universe.

"It was the day my grandmother exploded.”

– Iain Banks, Crow Road.

“A white Pomeranian named Fluffy flew out of the a fifth-floor window in Panna, which was a grand-new building with the painter’s scaffolding still around it. Fluffy screamed.”

– Vikram Chandra, Sacred Games.

See what I’m saying?  They pull you in and do not let go.

3.  Introduce us to a main character (but do it right.)

“Shadow had done three years in prison. He was big enough and looked don’t-fuck-with-me enough that his biggest problem was killing time. So he kept himself in shape, and taught himself coin tricks, and thought a lot about how much he loved his wife.”

– Neil Gaiman, American Gods.

This is one of my favorite literary openings of all time, because right off the bat we know almost everything we need to know about Shadow’s character (i.e. that he’s rugged, pragmatic, and loving.)   

Also note that it doesn’t tell us everything about Shadow:  it presents questions that make us want to read more.  How did Shadow get into prison?  When will he get out?  Will he reunite with his wife?  There’s also more details about Shadow slowly sprinkled in throughout the book, about his past, personality, and physical appearance.  This makes him feel more real and rounded as a character, and doesn’t pull the reader out of the story.

Obviously, I’m not saying you should rip off American Gods.  You don’t even need to include a hooker eating a guy with her cooch if you don’t want to.  

But this, and other successful openers, will give you just enough information about the main character to get the story started;  rarely any good comes from infodumping, and allowing your reader to get to know your character gradually will make them feel more real.   

4.  Learn from the greats.

My list of my favorite opening lines (and why I love them) is right here.

5.  Keep moving.  

The toughest part of being a writer is that it’s a rare and glorious occasion when you’re actually satisfied with something you write.  And to add another layer of complication, what you like best probably won’t be what your readers will like best. 

If you refuse to keep moving until you have the perfect first chapter, you will never write anything beyond your first chapter.  

Set a plan, and stick to it:  having a daily/weekly word or page goal can be extremely helpful, especially when you’re starting out.  Plotting is a lifesaver (some of my favorite posts on how to do so here, here, and here.)

Keep writing, keep moving, and rewrite later.  If you stay in one place for too long, you’ll never keep going. 

Best of luck, and happy writing.  <3

Patience child (from @caretaker-au) becomes the caretaker of the ruins!

The idea is that the patience child survived and they supported Chara’s plan, but instead of harvesting the souls they took care of the fallen children well and all, only taking the souls if the child turned out to be “one of those human”. After all, “the souls aren’t going anywhere, isn’t it?”

Bonus doodles!

“No, Chara, drawing on the walls didn’t make them a bad person.”

“But it was VANDALISM!”


“Keeping these children is the worst idea ever.”

“You’ve been wearing that for 2 days straight.”

“Shut up.”

i highkey wanna see alex go full rogue in exodus.

j'onn doesn’t want her on the cadmus case because he thinks she’s too close to it emotionally to act rationally, so she sneaks in and jams all the supplies she can into an old backpack. and j'onn kind of knows something’s going on, because alex is doing everything she can to block him out of her mind, but maggie assures him that she’s handling it.

but maggie is working with alex on this case, helping her bring down the organization that took her father away from her and caused her so much pain. they follow the still-active tracker winn planted on jeremiah to a remote location two days travel west of national city. they take their bikes and only stop once to rest up.

j'onn understands what’s happening immediately after alex doesn’t show up for work, and when maggie and alex arrive, kara is waiting for them (on j'onn’s orders). alex gets ready for an argument, but jeremiah’s betrayal had been hard on kara, too, and she joins them.

and in the end, cadmus’ members are scattered (or dead, mostly dead) and lillian luthor is being held at gunpoint by maggie sawyer while alex handcuffs her father with the nonterrestrial-resistant cuffs lena had sent when she learned about their plan.

and that’s how cadmus is destroyed; not by an army, but by a cop, an alien, and a heartbroken daughter.