for one the obvious is

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if you saw that I added to my masterpost earlier, you’ll know I found the Dear Deidre column featured in the corner at 0:49 of the video:

The line from the column that’s featured in the video is: “Our baby daughter hardly knows her father.”

I figured the other articles could be important, too, so I went looking at the other questions Dear Deidre published on the same day, October 9. The one in the upper left corner is this one:

The person who sent the question dated a girl who asked this person to buy her a new laptop, then ran up a £6,000 debt on their credit card, took £5,000 out of their savings, and dumped them. As the title states, she’s a gold-digger.

The one in the upper-right corner is this one:

The question is submitted by parents who have a teenager that constantly begs them for money and material objects. 

Aaaand this one is in the lower left:

And with that, we’ve successfully sourced all of the items in that frame!

anonymous asked:

pride and prejudice wasn't written as a resistance to the patriarchy djdjfhdhsj what

i mean i’ve been staring at this message for a solid minute now pondering how to reply, trying to figure out how ro reply, but honestly it boils down to one question: have you read it?

because literally the prevalent theme of pride & prejudice as well as other works of Austen—perhaps most visibly, sense & sensibility—is the ironic social commentary on the degraded role of women, as subjected and dependent on the way of whether they would marry well as they used to be?

like, honestly, what did you think it was about? sure it has a romance in it, but it’s probably one of the the most politically designed and carried out romantical arcs in literature, as it relies not so much on mutual affection, but rather darcy aknowledging his fault of diminishing elizabeth as an intelligent human being. at first, we see him as quite obviously set upon taking her for granted and applying stereotypes; startled with her outspoken attitude and clueless as to why she would reject him. because it IS surprising, that’s the point, given the context of Austen’s novel, the commonly praised choice would be to accept not only darcy, but mr collins without another thought. what do you think is the reason mrs bennet was so distraught all the time? there was no way of securing the future of her daughters other than marriage, we hear it being repeated over and over again—they cannot inherit their father’s fortune.

and—good grief. that’s the romantic ‘main plot’ concerning darcy and elizabeth alone, because the whole point is that he changes his beliefs and acknowledges elizabeth as an equal in the end. darcy isn’t exceptional for being surly and broody, he’s exceptional because he listens and learns.

but all the rest? the whole arc of charlotte, and her unhappy and dull marriage to mr collins, and the stark contrast with elizabeth. charlotte is not WRONG, she does the only thing she knows for certain will allow her to live in a respectful way without becoming ‘a burden to her parents’. the arc of lydia, basing off her portrayal against wickham? even with all his debt, infamy and faults, wickham’s opinion is at no point more blemished than lydia’s. that’s the point, that’s reiteraring the original notion of the disparity between men and women in regency England. the radiating, stinging paternalistic attitude of mr collins towards elizabeth when he marries charlotte and TELLS her that she would probably get no better chance. his absolute belief—corresponding with darcy’s, and contrasted with the latter’s rehabilitation later on—that elizabeth has no choice but accept him.

and elizabeth herself—for all the composition and impeccable manners, she IS a controversial figure in the novel. take the scene when she’s bashed by lady catherine de bourgh, the ongoing commentary on her being too forward with her opinions, the continuous bashing coming from her mother—the lingering threat that lizzy’s ‘stubbornness’ will cause her much trouble and, above all, prevent her from securing both her and the other sisters from absolute poverty when their father dies.

and, just … of course it’s written subtly, it’s conveyed in elizabeth’s wit, in austen’s slightly ironic narrative. the problem with the situation of women is not EXPLICITLY named and stated. it’s not modern times where we’re accustomed to forward addressing of feminist issues. no: it’s shown. it is not only the consistent theme in her works, it’s the prevalent theme of them. i mean, come on, there’s tonnes and tonnes of books that were NOT written with a purpose of targeting partiarchy. fuck, there are much MORE of such books than there is of the latter kind. But to choose Pride & Prejudice specifically, a novel which became one of the most famous books in the world, renowned for e x a c t l y t h i s … i cannot comprehend. please, at least consider this: do you really think the purpose of austen writing p&p was writing a romance? really? why would it become so much of a literature landmark, then?

i don’t mean to be nasty and honestly, go and have your opinion, you’re perfectly entitled to it, but it does make me sad that a novel that is a witty, outsanding and one of a kind social commentary on the plight of women in a specific time period written by a woman IN the time period is turned into something as common as a novel with a romantic plot. that’s all.

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Some tododekus from @pitviperofdoom‘s Summer Stars fic! Aka the fic that has been killing me with every update  _(:‘3」z)_

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NEW VERSION

imagine RFA helps Jaehee with her café and each one of them has a cupcake based on their personality & favourite flavor on the menu

Jaehee: Tiramisu Cupcakes

Jumin: Dark Chocolate Cupcakes

Zen: Angel Food Berry Cupcakes

V: Cinnamon Cupcakes

Seven: Honey Lemon Cupcakes

Yoosung: Raspberry Chocolate Cupcakes

Saeran: Mint Chocolate Cupcakes

BONUS

Vanderwood joins the party with his secret agent menu cupcake

It’s a bit more complicated than invisibility...

This occurred to me and I feel it’s worth posting since I’ve never seen any talk on this?

The One Ring doesn’t make you invisible. 

Why would it? Seriously, what purpose on Eru’s green earth does that serve? Sauron forging his ring of power in the heart of a volcano, thinking to himself, ah yes, invisibility would be a good trick to build into this thing! No. Cause you know what? Sauron’s ring does not make him invisible. And he certainly did not intend for anyone else to ever have it. So what’s it really doing?

Two words: Dimensional shift

I believe that when mortals put on the ring, they experience a dimensional shift in which they are pulled (stretched, transported) into a higher dimension, the plane on which the true spirit forms of the Ainur (and wraiths) exist. This would effectively render them invisible to those on lower dimensions, but the wearer would be able to view them with altered enhanced perception. Such as the effects we witness as described by those who have worn the ring. Especially well portrayed in the films is the ability to see the souls of others, particularly the ringwraiths (the battle on Weathertop is a good example, as well as even in Battle of the Five Armies when Bilbo is in Dale), black and white shadowy souls clear as day but invisible to the naked eye, as they exist on a different dimensional plane. It’s quite possible to me that the ëalar of the Ainur are in a higher dimension than that of mortal fëar, but that’s beside the point. They’re at least a couple dimensions removed from our reality, and thus invisible until one puts on the ring. 

Now, why would the ring have this power? I think, if I recall correctly, that Tolkien at one point did state that it was not intentional, that it was a byproduct of its making. Again, it does not turn Sauron invisible - it wouldn’t, he already exists on that plane. Mortals are bound to their bodies and so would not be able to perceive that higher dimension, but Ainur are not. I think most plausibly, this effect exists because Sauron infused a piece of his own soul into the one ring. The consequences of this are not well understood (it’s not like it’s a common practice) and we know in other ways, it is so strong in its desire to hearken back to its master, it can even influence the wills - a product of the souls - of those around it. I would not be surprised in the slightest if having a piece of Ainur ëala in an all-powerful object would result in the ability to bend reality to attempt to match the wearer to the properties of the owner. It would bring the wearer closer to Sauron, and allow him to perceive them, thus furthering its purpose to return to the whole from which it is a part. 

Just a theory, obviously, but I find it odd that I’ve never seen anyone question the rather absurd notion of ‘magic evil ring makes you invisible!’ Tolkien set up so many intriguing questions, concepts, and possibilities with underlying scientific principles - or at least, consistent rules - that I am sure this fits into his framework. 

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I may have gotten carried away with this and decided to take the opportunity to draw a bunch of various Ricks and how I headcanon they looked as little kids. Have fun trying to sort out who’s who.

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Yeah, but we only use them when we mean it!

I had wondered for a while why Yang purposefully said “father figure” here.
It’s not just Ruby, Yang totally sees Qrow as a father figure too and I love it.

an ode to the theatre kids i guess

To the twelve year olds that seek out 17th century French literature because they want to read more about Enjolras and Grantaire.

To the kids reaching for biographies about the guy that they once thought was a president to learn the other side of the Reynolds Affair.

To the kids ambitious enough to open War and Peace, in hopes of hearing the electropop opera from an ancient book.

To the kids that have a new thirst for knowledge,

Because they know how lucky they are to have access to it.

Because they know that there are so many naughty girls who don’t get books.

Or boys that can’t afford to sell or read the papes.

Because they know it’s a hard knock life.

And they’re alone in the universe.

To the kids that need to be reminded that you matter to me and you will be found.

Maybe they don’t listen learn to sing from their governess,

Or to fly.

Maybe they just learn that life could be beautiful,

As they sit on their school bus, wondering if there’s enough hope to get through Krises and Heathers and Gastons.

Maybe they wish for a supercomputer or a Grimmerie.

Maybe they’re older and feel pretty or that something’s coming.

To the daughters that see an extra speck of joy in everything,

That hum laments when they develop colds,

And ballads when reprimanded and sick of swimming.

To the sons that wonder if there’s a possibility of a brighter life,

If they won the lottery and became rich men,

Or took their fears and turned them off.

This is to the theatre kids.

Raise a glass, you bet your ass,

To the theatre kids.

Because they’re writing the orchestrations and soundtracks of your future.

i’d like to dedicate this post to the whole month I spent staring at sparrow genji in the overwatch menu screen as the squad and I queued for games, whispering quietly to myself “how do you do your eyeliner genji??? it’s so nice. pls tell me your secrets”

Shiro: I’m Japanese.

Lance: I’m Cuban.

Hunk: I’m Samoan.

Keith: I’m half-Galra. Dunno what my Dad was, but it doesn’t matter.

Pidge: Whoa, that’s so cool! I’m not entirely sure on all the details, but I’m probably, like, 25% Italian? Maybe less than that? Definitely have some British and Irish roots somewhere, maybe a little Dutch and German? A smidge of French?

The other Paladins:

Keith, my love. (*´◡`)/♥ Who made you angry? (Shiro, Hunk) | Redbubble