for lola

Loud House Siblings episode count

Originally posted by theloudhouse

So I recently asked @mandareeboo  who their least favorite Loud House sibling was and they said Lynn. When she mentioned Lynn, it made me realized that she barely have any episodes that focus on her.  So I got to thinking  about the other loud siblings and I decided to make a list about the number of episodes that focus on a specific loud siblings.Now while some episodes will have all of the Lud Siblings, there’s usually at least two who share the spotlight.  For example, even though “Undie Pressure”  involve all of the loud siblings, but focuses on Lincoln, then I would consider it a Lincoln episode.  Then they are episodes that focuses on a sister that shares the spotlight with Lincoln. So for those, I’ll give points two both Siblings unless the episode focuses more on a specific sibling of the duo. For example, I consider “Driving Ms. Hazy”  A Leni and Lincoln episode since they share about equal spotlight, so I would give them both points.  For an episode like  "Patching Things Up"I would give both Lola and Lanna points since it primarily focuses on them. Now this may be kind of inaccurate since what I may consider to be a Lincoln episode, someone else will consider it a Lincoln and Lori episode (like how I consider the episode  “The Waiting Game” a Lincoln episode instead of a Lincoln and Lori episode). So take this list with a grain of salt since it’s my personal opinion.  Also, this list is covering all of the episodes up until The Loudest Mission Special 


Lori Episode Count: 3 

Leni Episode Count: 2 

Luna Episode Count: 2

Luan  Episode Count: 2 

Lynn Jr  Episode Count:2 

Lincoln  Episode Count: 62 

Lucy  Episode Count: 3

Lana  Episode Count: 3 

Lola  Episode Count: 3 

Lisa  Episode Count: 2 

Lilly  Episode Count: 3 

“My Family’s Slave” and the people who don’t want to understand Filipino culture

I got blocked within 1 minute of sending the second tweet

Instead of listening to actual Filipinos about Lola and her legacy, Miss “I study and value diversity so I will never listen to people who actually know the culture and context in which this occurred” just blocks them for disagreeing with her

So here’s a message for all y’all who think you can fight for Lola’s story but then entirely disregard the culture from which she came: 

Shut up and listen. 

I am so fucking disgusted by every “oh this is so sad” “how could anybody do this” “she should have killed that family” comment from a westerner who has no context of our culture or how they themselves contributed to it

The country that makes a Filipino maid joke every other time we as a race are mentioned shouldn’t take the moral high ground because you suddenly feel sad about it

You don’t understand how Filipinos treat family, how they’re willing to humble themselves to extremes, how being in America is already a huge fucking deal for those who grew up in the province, how that contributes to the “utang na loob” culture that while not necessarily good, is a big part of how every Filipino operates

Yes, what happened to Lola was bad. I call her Lola because 1) She would not have gone by eudocia, not even with her own family and community. Filipinos have nicknames, always, with some exceptions (our driver Tommy’s actual first name is Tommy, so). 2) Lola means old woman as much as it means grandma, so for a lack of a name that isn’t just on her grave stone and birth certificate, we call her Lola, which people in the community would have called her at that age regardless. Which Kendall might have known had she not blocked every single Filipino who actually knows a thing or two. 

What happened to her was slavery yes. Not because she served an abusive family, but because she didn’t have a choice and they didn’t pay her. It is not the kind of slavery you can put a black American context to, which is what Kendall did. In order to understand just why she didn’t leave even at the opportunities she was given, you have to understand her culture as much as her situation. 

To do otherwise is an affront to anybody who’s experienced or experiencing the same. Filipino maids are being abused in every country, even paid. They’re treated like slaves today, at this very moment, but are not considered such because they have income, little as it is. But instead of saying “huhu how sad” and “we have to end their slavery!” think about why we do it and what could be done to make sure they’re treated fairly. 

And actually listen.