for george lovers

2

Currently (re-)reading: Edward W. Said, Orientalism
George Orwell, Essays
Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

Summer reading. I’m re-reading Orientalism before I read Covering Islam. I’ve never read Fanon before so I’m looking forward to that. And a little Orwell is always good.

It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all - in which case, you fail by default.
—  J.K. Rowling

anonymous asked:

I'd also like to point out that that snow thingy happened right after that chapter where jon decided to keep his Snow name. Idk it might be nothing but my shipper heart just found it so beautiful i cried lol!!

Yes it is something Anony.

And I was about to answer a comment from cruyffsbeckenbauer (I love Jonsa and I will go to Jonsa hell for saying this but…Ramsay was also a snow.) To explain more about the snow symbolism. So here you go:

@cruyffsbeckenbauer​ YES, Ramsay WAS also a Snow. He was a Snow before he was legitimazed as Ramsay Bolton by King Tommen Baratheon as a reward for betraying House Stark.

Ramsay Bolton is a minor character and has zero links to Sansa herself in the books (I HATE D&D for what they did to Sansa in the TV series) and Ramsay has zero links to actual snow more than his former surname. 

On the contrary, Jon is not only a Snow, he is the bastard of House Stark, The Wardens of The North. The Starks motto is “Winter is coming”. Jon is always associated with snow (his surname, his white as snow direwolf Ghost), ice (The Wall), winter (Starks motto) and The North (Winterfell, home):

The boy absorbed that all in silence. He had the Stark face if not the name: long, solemn, guarded, a face that gave nothing away. Whoever his mother had been, she had left little of herself in her son. 

A Game of Thrones - Tyrion II

She might have overlooked a dozen bastards for Ned’s sake, so long as they were out of sight. Jon was never out of sight, and as he grew, he looked more like Ned than any of the trueborn sons she bore him.

A Game of Thrones - Catelyn II

“A shade more exhausting than needlework,” Jon observed.
“A shade more fun than needlework,” Arya gave back at him. Jon grinned, reached over, and messed up her hair. Arya flushed. They had always been close. Jon had their father’s face, as she did

A Game of Thrones - Arya I

Sansa could never understand how two sisters, born only two years apart, could be so different. It would have been easier if Arya had been a bastard, like their half brother Jon. She even looked like Jon, with the long face and brown hair of the Starks, and nothing of their lady mother in her face or her coloring. 

A Game of Thrones - Sansa I

“Who’s this one now?“ Craster said before Jon could go. “He has the look of a Stark.”

“My steward and squire, Jon Snow.”

—A Clash of Kings - Jon III

His northern features are the perfect disguise to hide his true parentage. He is acknowledged as a Stark just by looking at his face. He looks like a younger version of Ned.

And to talk about what the Anony said, the association that Sansa made between the lover’s kisses and snowflakes happened right after the chapter where Jon decided to keep his Snow name (Stannis offered him to be legitimazed as Jon Stark and become the Lord of Winterfell). I wrote a really long post about it, you can read it here. So I’m going to repeat some important points that I mentioned on that post:

  • (…) the seventh Sansa’s chapter of A Storm of Swords (the one where Sansa builds a Snow Castle {Winterfell}) comes immediately after the twelfth Jon’s chapter, the chapter where he found his answer to Stannis offer of Winterfell. And what it was that helped John to find his answer? His beloved direwolf, Ghost.
  • (…) instead of Tyrion, Willas or even Robert, who pursue Sansa’s claim over her, there is a man that has been offered Winterfell and choose her over it: By right Winterfell should go to my sister Sansa.“ “Winterfell belongs to my sister Sansa.” Among all the high lords interested in becoming the Lord of Winterfell by marrying Sansa Stark, the bastard Jon Snow refused to despoil his sister Sansa of her rights, even if her claim is the one thing he has wanted as much as he had ever wanted anything. Don’t you find this very romantic? I mean, when Sansa thinks: “No one will ever marry me for love” (Because everyone only wants her claim to Winterfell), at the other part of the world is Jon Snow saying more than once: By right Winterfell should go to my sister Sansa.“ “Winterfell belongs to my sister Sansa.” This for me is one of the most romantic passages of the books. 
  • (…) at the same time, Jon and Sansa had an important realization concerning to their lost and broken home, Winterfell. And what that helped them to reach that realization was the snow. Literally snow in Sansa’s case and Ghost, the direwolf as white as snow, in Jon’s case.

And finally, I just wanted to point out that Jon and Sansa both loved Robb very much and both of them remember the last time they saw him at Winterfell describing him with snowflakes in his hair:

Outside the flakes drifted down as soft and silent as memory. Was this what woke me? Already the snowfall lay thick upon the garden below, blanketing the grass, dusting the shrubs and statues with white and weighing down the branches of the trees. The sight took Sansa back to cold nights long ago, in the long summer of her childhood.

She had last seen snow the day she’d left Winterfell. That was a lighter fall than this, she remembered. Robb had melting flakes in his hair when he hugged me, and the snowball Arya tried to make kept coming apart in her hands. It hurt to remember how happy she had been that morning. Hullen had helped her mount, and she’d ridden out with the snowflakes swirling around her, off to see the great wide world. I thought my song was beginning that day, but it was almost done.

—A Storm of Swords - Sansa VII

“She has more courage than she knows,” said Sam.

“So do you, Sam. Have a swift, safe voyage, and take care of her and Aemon and the child.” The cold trickles on his face reminded Jon of the day he’d bid farewell to Robb at Winterfell, never knowing that it was for the last time. “And pull your hood up. The snowflakes are melting in your hair.”

—A Dance with Dragons - Jon II

Jon flexed the fingers of his sword hand. The Night’s Watch takes no part. He closed his fist and opened it again. What you propose is nothing less than treason. He thought of Robb, with snowflakes melting in his hair. Kill the boy and let the man be born. (…)

—A Dance with Dragons - Jon XIII

So, the snowflakes always appear as a symbol of love, happiness and home.