for a light read

i have this theory that every time we dream, we see an alternate reality. after all, in string theory, all universes exist. i have died many times there. i get déjà vu a lot. i wonder if i am in someone else’s dream, and she has just woken up. maybe she’s screaming at me to stop, to move a little to the left, to watch out. when i wake up i always wonder if i’m the same me or i’ve been replaced by the girl in my dream. if i died there to get a second chance here. or maybe here is where i’m learning how not to die so violently. i don’t know. i don’t get much sleep. 

For a long time, neither of them spoke. Somewhere far beyond the office walls, Harry could hear the sound of voices, students heading down to the Great Hall for an early breakfast, perhaps. It seemed impossible that there could be people in the world who still desired food, who laughed, who neither knew nor cared that Sirius Black was gone forever. […]

“I feel I owe you another explanation, Harry,” said Dumbledore hesitantly. “You may, perhaps, have wondered why I never chose you as a prefect? I must confess … that I rather thought … you had enough responsibility to be going on with.” Harry looked up at him and saw a tear trickling down Dumbledore’s face into his long silver beard.

4

An Examination of Every Instance Where Alexander Hamilton Explicitly Stated His Love for John Laurens

Cold in my professions, warm in my friendships, I wish, my Dear Laurens, it might be in my power, by action rather than words, to convince you that I love you_ - Alexander Hamilton to John Laurens, April 1779

We all love you sincerely; but I have more of the infirmities of human nature, than the others and suspect my self of being byassed by my partiality for you. - Alexander Hamilton to John Laurens, June 30, 1780

I feel the deepest affliction at the news we have just received of the loss of our dear and inestimable friend Laurens.  His career of virtue is at an end_  How strangely are human affairs conducted, that so many excellent qualities could not ensure a more happy fate?_  The world will feel the loss of a man who has left few like him behind, and America of a citizen whose heart realized that patriotism of which others only talk_  I feel the loss of a friend I truly and most tenderly loved, and one of a very small number. - Alexander Hamilton to Nathanael Greene, October 12, 1782

Poor Laurens; he has fallen a sacrifice to his ardor in a trifling skirmish in South Carolina.  You know how truly I loved him and will judge how much I regret him. - Alexander Hamilton to the Marquis de Lafayette, November 3, 1782