football news

“When I sign a player I tell them that at least 50 percent of their success is my responsibility and 50 percent is theirs. Furthermore, I always say that I never know if a player is a great player until I know if he is a good or bad person.That’s because he could be a genius, but if he only helps me in three games a year and then causes me problems in the rest of the matches (it’s a problem).

Looking at the example of Ronaldo and Messi: Ronaldo, for example, fascinates everybody but I’m sure that later on he works harder than anybody. The game has its rules and we all must try to understand them; you can then apply these rules to your private life.” - Jurgen Klopp has reiterated that he will only sign players if their attitude is on point. 

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Becca Longo is believed to be first woman to ever get a college football scholarship

  • A high school senior in Arizona just became the first female football scholarship recipient at an NCAA DII school or higher, per ESPN.
  • Becca Longo has signed a letter of intent with Adams State University in Alamosa, Colorado, according to CNN, after sending out her highlights reel to various colleges and adding Timm Rosenbach, the head football coach at Adams State, on Twitter. 
  • That caught his eye, and got him to watch her tape.
  • “If she’s able to compete at a level we think she’s able to compete at, we should afford her that opportunity to do that,” Rosenbach told CNN.
  • According to ESPN, roughly a dozen women have played college football, but Longo is the first known scholarship recipient. Read more (4/17/17 1:50 PM)
Aaron Hernadez’s suicide makes him legally innocent now.

I’m SO TIRED of the Aaron Hernandez posts from conspiracy theorists and armchair lawyers but……….this one actually checks out for the most part and it’s pretty fascinating.

Remember, the most recent case where Hernandez was found not guilty was not his only murder rap.  In 2015, he had already been found guilty of murdering Odin Lloyd. This double homicide trial for the murders of Daniel Jorge Correia de Abreu and Safiro Teixeira Furtado had no bearing on the first one.  

Our legal system was primarily based on the English legal system, and the Massachusetts law that covers abatement ab initio dates back to the Thirteen Colonies.  Less than ten states still have abatement ab initio on the books, but Massachusetts is one of those states. “Ab initio” in Latin means “from the beginning” and the idea of the law is your legal status goes back to the beginning, as in before your trial, if you die during an appeal or before your legal status is finalized.  Your case is not over just because you’re found guilty.  It’s over once you’ve exhausted all of your appeals.  A higher court always has the option of overturning a conviction.  In Hernandez’s case, he died before a higher court has the opportunity to overturn or uphold his conviction, so therefore, his legal status goes back to the beginning.  He’s innocent now.

Martin Healy, the chief legal counsel for the Massachusetts Bar Association, explains that the state observes abatement ab initio, which in criminal proceedings is applied if a defendant dies before all of their appeals have been resolved.

Under abatement ab initio (the latter phrase meaning “from the beginning”), the defendant’s case returns to its initial phase and the slate is wiped clean.

“It’s as if the trial has never happened, and it’s as if the indictment has never happened,” says Healy, who is unconnected to the case.

So “under the eyes of the law, Hernandez has died an innocent man,” Healy continues. “He has not been convicted of any crime in Massachusetts.”

(cont. People)

Abatement ab initio only makes its way into the press when a high profile criminal dies sometime before his legal status has been settled.  The most familiar one to most of us would have been Ken Lay during the Enron scandal.  He was found guilty and prosecutors were looking for Lay to pay back $44 million in restitution in addition to jail time.  His conviction was erased when he died of a heart attack before sentencing because, just like with an appeal, his legal status hadn’t been finalized.

As for the Patriots’ contract, the family can now sue on the grounds that Hernandez was innocent and his contract shouldn’t have been nullified.  The Patriots’ actually nixed that contract when Hernandez was indicted, so it’ll still take some legal maneuvering in court, but the conviction from Hernandez’s first trial can never be brought up in court ever again, not in a contract disupte or in a civil suit brought by the victim’s family.  Any party going against Hernandez’s estate at this point has to start from scratch to prove his guilt all over again.  It’s basically a retrial where the defense knows exactly what the prosecution will say and can build their strategy around that.

As for the meme, most of it is correct, but Hernandez was never entitled to that $15 million.  It was a contract over the course of a few years and it wasn’t guaranteed.  The family can sue for the remainder of the signing bonus though, which is still a few million dollars.  Whether Hernandez knew all of this when he committed suicide is impossible for us to know, but I’m still pretty interested to see how it will play out.

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Leaked NFL handbook reveals the sexist rules cheerleaders endure — for abysmal pay

  • If you want to be an NFL cheerleader in California, you’ll have to learn to keep your legs closed. Literally.
  • In 2014, the Los Angeles Times released excerpts of the 2012 Raiderettes etiquette agreement. Mic has obtained a comprehensive copy, embedded here
  • It provides an unsettling overview of the rigid and blatantly sexist double standards cheerleaders must endure with a smile, because “negative facial expressions” are prohibited.
  • The agreement details fines for cheerleaders who fail to expose their belly buttons on “2 Piece Tuesdays.” It also warns against fraternizing with players, lest they risk “being assaulted” and ruining their “reputations." 
  • All this, allegedly, for a salary of around $3,000 a year. Read more (2/16/17 5:00 PM)

“I wasn’t swearing at the ref or anyone else,” protested Todd afterwards. “Anyone else would have done the same - he nearly blew my ear off.” Manager Mark Heard was supportive. “Players should be sent off for swearing at the ref or a player,” he added after his team won the game 11-2. “But referees are supposed to use a bit of common sense.” SOURCE

Keep reading

theguardian.com
Dortmund attack: man arrested on suspicion of share-dealing plot
Police believe 28-year-old German-Russian national attacked bus in hope of profiting from consequent fall in club’s stock
By Philip Oltermann

In short: Last Tuesday three bombs exploded next to the team bus of German football club Borussia Dortmund, when they were on their way to a Champions League game. A player and a police officer got severly injured. The police found a letter that said that ISIS was responsible, but they doubted the origin of it from the beginning. They said so openly as did the German media. (The English-language ones and social media were keen to say it was ISIS and disregarded the suspicion of the German police.) Turns out it was a German-Russian national, who was speculating that by killing players the market value of Borussia Dortmund at the stock exchange would fall and he could make some money.


I don’t have words for this. It is more disgusting than anything I thought. For this guy human lives are just things that matter in his stock value plot. He dehumanised the players, he then blamed it on a terror group, which leads to marginalised groups like refugees and muslims getting attacked in hate crimes. This asshole is the lowest of low, because he obviously lacks every bit of humanity but selfishness and greed. 

Please, spread the word that the attack in Dortmund wasn’t ISIS. As vile and disgusting they are, they are used as a device to attack muslims and refugees and spread hate and nationalism. This hate is a bigger threat to Europe than ISIS.

Lorenzo's contact renewal with Napoli

SSC Napoli is organising a press conference (probably on Saturday 22, along with Sarri’s conference about the match against Sassuolo, or on Monday 24) in which Lorenzo Insigne will sign his new contract, bonding him for 5 years with Aurelio De Laurentiis’ football association. They’re planning a conference - and not only to publish a tweet with a picture as usual - because Napoli wants to celebrate the lifetime renewed contract of the only one napoletano in the team.