food-therapy

anonymous asked:

I'm having a down night after feeling okay for almost a full week, do you have any routines you do or things you watch/listen to when you feel yourself starting to spiral?

yeah I have a list of self care/calming stuff:

-turn off all lights in my room and listen to a podcast

-free write for 10 minutes about my thoughts/feelings

-write down all the things i’m grateful for

-listen to some asmr videos- I like paper folding a lot

-calm.com is a pretty cool website (it’s also an app!) where you can choose a bunch of soothing nature sounds + breathing exercises

-asoftmurmur.com is great one for creating your own custom calming background sounds- you can choose the type of nature/calming noises you want and it mixes it for you

-chill anime beats playlist on soundcloud is so good

-if you use spotify at all, the playlists ‘4am comedown’, ‘brain food’, and ‘musical therapy’ are nice

-slime, calligraphy, pottery, kinetic sand, paint mixing videos on instagram (search the tags) and theres a bunch of blogs on here that post them too if you look around (i have a sideblog where i just reblog them if you want to look on that/who i reblog from)

-i personally haven’t done anything with this yet but i found out that pixar has a free online class on khan academy? so if you want to just learn some cool tips that could be fun. also just looking around on khan academy for something you’re interested in could be a good distraction

-the peaceful cuisine channel is fantastic!! they make food that’s filmed beautifully with just the cooking sounds and no talking/music

hope that helps!

A cupcake a day probably doesn’t keep the doctor away, but that’s alright. A cupcake a day keeps the blues away, which is great reasoning at that. I think I’ll have one, or 4. 💕🎂 #cupcakelogic 

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Soothing Food Preparation Rituals with Psychologist @nouralmejadi

To see more photos from Nour, follow @nouralmejadi on Instagram.

As a psychologist, 23-year-old Nour Al Mejadi’s (@nouralmejadi) work focuses mainly on comforting others. But when she needs her own respite, Nour turns to cooking — lots of cooking.

“I love food,” says Nour, who lives in Kuwait. “My mother is very supportive, but she complains that I am always using the kitchen. So now we’re building another small kitchen just for me.”

But Nour isn’t just interested in her final products — documenting the preparation is equally important. “I don’t make food just to take a picture, but I never make food and not take a picture of it,” she says. Nour’s attentive nature comes out during each stage of cooking. Combining ingredients from the East and West, she creates distinctive dishes with a simple presentation and style. The process is a soothing ritual for Nour and it has had bonus social benefits. “I’m really shy,” she says. “When I started my new job I baked cupcakes and passed them around so that people would talk to me. I never make food just for myself — I make it for others. It’s helping me break out of my shell and meet new people.”

I want to talk to my shrink RIGHT NOW! But it doesn’t work like that, it’s also like 7:00 AM on a Sunday so it REALLY doesn’t work like that, but I don’t want my thoughts to shift too much by Friday, when I do see him again.

I just want to be honest and vulnerable, specifically in terms of:

  • Am I lying to myself?
  • Have I settled? What does this mean to me? I don’t think there’s anything inherently, morally wrong with settling, but I do need to be honest with myself and understand the facts of it which is not always easy to do.
  • Are things as good as I think they are?
  • Do I actually want to be well, more than just expressing it? No judgement around it, but what are the honest facts if I am quasi for the rest of my life? Am I okay with that? Because if so, it means that I am honestly valuing weight and shape over other things. It means I am honestly supporting diet culture even if I loathe it.
  • Has a lot of my anger of late actually been defensiveness?
  • Am I advocating for eating disordered people as much as I’m striving too or am I actually advocating for their disorders? Is it one or the other?
  • Who is more in charge (me vs. the disorder)?
  • (Am I asking questions I know the answer to?)
  • What are the risks of this? What are the benefits? What are the risks and benefits of change?
  • What makes sense in my life? Regarding school, work, timing, finances, etc.?
  • What work does he see me left having to do if I were to push (really push) for a full recovery?
  • Am I going to really push or just talk about it?
  • Is it wisest to do this somewhere better equipped or is it possible to do this as an outpatient with him? Accountability seems to be the biggest piece.
  • If I completely trusted him and my dietitian, what would their steps be?

Questions are just questions, but I at least need to ask them. I want to ask them, but the biggest question is, do I want to do anything with the answers?

I feel so lost in terms of who I am and what I think. How do I trust anything?

youtube

The Human Frequency - Gerson Therapy, The Natural Cure For Cancer 

A cancer survivor who cured himself using Gerson Therapy tells us all about how to rid the body of toxins while adding all the nutrients so deficient in our modern diet. With a strict protocol of drinking cold-pressed juices, eating a fresh organic diet, and using coffee enemas to remove toxins, cancer patients all over the world have done what mainstream medicine has deemed impossible. Our guest explains what foods are beneficial, and which should be avoided by people seeking to cure their cancer naturally.

FREE HORTICULTURAL THERAPY FOR STUDENTS LIVING WITH MENTAL HEALTH STRESS IN TORONTO

RyeACCESS and the Good Food Centre are holding a free community gardening and outdoorsy support group this summer at Ryerson University! 

Who we are: RyeACCESS is the equity centre for students with disabilities at Ryerson, challenging ableism, sanism, and audism on campus. The Good Food Centre works to reduce the impacts of food insecurity for all Ryerson community members.

What the program offers: Gardening, creative arts, meditation, discussions, and workshops depending on what participants want.

Who can participate: Any Toronto student who lives with mental health stress. We recognize the following terms: mad, consumer/survivor/user, mentally ill, crazy, neurodivergent, brainweird, and other similar terms.

What students will get: a place to de-stress, connect with each other and resources, learn skills, and chill out. Meals and TTC tokens will be provided.

Our first session is this Saturday. We will be developing community guidelines for a safer space together. All locations will be wheelchair-accessible and sober scent-free spaces. If you’d like to know more, please contact access@rsuonline.ca. And please signal boost <3

Click Keep Reading for transcript of image

Keep reading

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By popular demand, I’ve opened up a Redbubble account to sell Magical Art Therapy series prints! The shop not only includes prints of both six-sigil sets and individual sigils, but stationary like postcards and stickers. And there’s a 50% discount on six or more small stickers or postcards, which is convenient if you’d like to grab multiples.

Anyways, I’d like to thank everyone once again so, so much for the overwhelming positive response to my Magical Art Therapy series. I hope you will enjoy the shop. Please let me know if there are any other products you’d like to see and I’ll see what I can do. And feel free to reblog and help spread the word to people that might be interested!

Shop Magical Art Therapy Sigils Here!

The only thing you have to offer another human being, ever, is your own state of being. You can cop out only just so long, saying, ‘I’ve got all this nice stuff, I know all this and I can do all this.’ But everything you do, whether you’re cooking food or doing therapy or being a student or being a lover … you are only doing your own BEING … you’re only manifesting how evolved a consciousness you are. That’s what you’re doing with another human being. That’s the only dance there is!
—  Ram Dass