food terms

lily taking james out on a muggle date and james being Embarrassing™   

The Excessively Detailed Headcanon Tumblr Meme

tigersniper:

Send me some numbers and a character name and I will tell you:

  1. What does their bedroom look like?
  2. Do they have any daily rituals?
  3. Do they exercise, and if so, what do they do? How often?
  4. What would they do if they needed to make dinner but the kitchen was busy?
  5. Cleanliness habits (personal, workspace, etc.)
  6. Eating habits and sample daily menu
  7. Favorite way to waste time and feelings surrounding wasting time
  8. Favorite indulgence and feelings surrounding indulging
  9. Makeup?
  10. Neuroses? Do they recognize them as such?
  11. Intellectual pursuits?
  12. Favorite book genre?
  13. Sexual Orientation? And, regardless of own orientation, thoughts on sexual orientation in general?
  14. Physical abnormalities? (Both visible and not, including injuries/disabilities, long-term illnesses, food-intolerances, etc.)
  15. Biggest and smallest short term goal?
  16. Biggest and smallest long term goal?
  17. Preferred mode of dress and rituals surrounding dress
  18. Favorite beverage?
  19. What do they think about before falling asleep at night?
  20. Childhood illnesses? Any interesting stories behind them?
  21. Turn-ons? Turn-offs?
  22. Given a blank piece of paper, a pencil, and nothing to do, what would happen?
  23. How organized are they? How does this organization/disorganization manifest in their everyday life?
  24. Is there one subject of study that they excel at? Or do they even care about intellectual pursuits at all?
  25. How do they see themselves 5 years from today?
  26. Do they have any plans for the future? Any contingency plans if things don’t workout?
  27. What is their biggest regret?
  28. Who do they see as their best friend? Their worst enemy?
  29. Reaction to sudden extrapersonal disaster (eg The house is on fire! What do they do?)
  30. Reaction to sudden intrapersonal disaster (eg close family member suddenly dies)
  31. Most prized possession?
  32. Thoughts on material possessions in general?
  33. Concept of home and family?
  34. Thoughts on privacy? (Are they a private person, or are they prone to ‘TMI’?)
  35. What activities do they enjoy, but consider to be a waste of time?
  36. What makes them feel guilty?
  37. Are they more analytical or more emotional in their decision-making?
  38. Would they consider themselves a Type A or Type B personality?
  39. What recharges them when they’re feeling drained?
  40. Would you say that they have a superiority-complex? Inferiority-complex? Neither?
  41. How misanthropic are they?
  42. Hobbies?
  43. How far did they get in formal education? What are their views on formal education vs self-education?
  44. Religion?
  45. Superstitions or views on the occult?
  46. Do they express their thoughts through words or deeds?
  47. If they were to fall in love, who (or what) is their ideal?
  48. How do they express love?
  49. If this person were to get into a fist fight, what is their fighting style like?
  50. Is this person afraid of dying? Why or why not?
Langblr Vocabulary List Ideas

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my level of extra: going on a cinematic adventure for a recipe video

THE EXCESSIVELY DETAILED HEADCANON TUMBLR MEME

Send me some numbers, and I will tell you:

  1. What does their bedroom look like?
  2. Do they have any daily rituals?
  3. Do they exercise, and if so, what do they do? How often?
  4. What would they do if they needed to make dinner but the kitchen was busy?
  5. Cleanliness habits (personal, workspace, etc.)
  6. Eating habits and sample daily menu
  7. Favorite way to waste time and feelings surrounding wasting time
  8. Favorite indulgence and feelings surrounding indulging
  9. Makeup?
  10. Neuroses? Do they recognize them as such?
  11. Intellectual pursuits?
  12. Favorite book genre?
  13. Sexual Orientation? And, regardless of own orientation, thoughts on sexual orientation in general?
  14. Physical abnormalities? (Both visible and not, including injuries/disabilities, long-term illnesses, food-intolerances, etc.)
  15. Biggest and smallest short term goal?
  16. Biggest and smallest long term goal?
  17. Preferred mode of dress and rituals surrounding dress
  18. Favorite beverage?
  19. What do they think about before falling asleep at night?
  20. Childhood illnesses? Any interesting stories behind them?
  21. Turn-ons? Turn-offs?
  22. Given a blank piece of paper, a pencil, and nothing to do, what would happen?
  23. How organized are they? How does this organization/disorganization manifest in their everyday life?
  24. Is there one subject of study that they excel at? Or do they even care about intellectual pursuits at all?
  25. How do they see themselves 5 years from today?
  26. Do they have any plans for the future? Any contingency plans if things don’t workout?
  27. What is their biggest regret?
  28. Who do they see as their best friend? Their worst enemy?
  29. Reaction to sudden extrapersonal disaster (eg The house is on fire! What do they do?)
  30. Reaction to sudden intrapersonal disaster (eg close family member suddenly dies)
  31. Most prized possession?
  32. Thoughts on material possessions in general?
  33. Concept of home and family?
  34. Thoughts on privacy? (Are they a private person, or are they prone to ‘TMI’?)
  35. What activities do they enjoy, but consider to be a waste of time?
  36. What makes them feel guilty?
  37. Are they more analytical or more emotional in their decision-making?
  38. Would they consider themselves a Type A or Type B personality?
  39. What recharges them when they’re feeling drained?
  40. Would you say that they have a superiority-complex? Inferiority-complex? Neither?
  41. How misanthropic are they?
  42. Hobbies?
  43. How far did they get in formal education? What are their views on formal education vs self-education?
  44. Religion?
  45. Superstitions or views on the occult?
  46. Do they express their thoughts through words or deeds?
  47. If they were to fall in love, who (or what) is their ideal?
  48. How do they express love?
  49. If this person were to get into a fist fight, what is their fighting style like?
  50. Is this person afraid of dying? Why or why not?

The real Learning English Experience™ is knowing certain terms for food and being reasonably familiar with them but not actually knowing what this term actually refers to

I’ve been fluent in English for a few years now and I don’t know what a poptart is suposed to be

Cheap Vegan Essentials

Below is a short list of foods which I think should be in the basket of every new vegan when they go on that first vegan shopping trip. Prices will vary according to location, but in the vast majority of places these foods will be some of the cheapest items in any supermarket.  You can find a selection of simple recipes that make use of these items as their main ingredients here.

  • Rice: Rice is an extremely cheap and filling staple. A cup of rice contains roughly 45 grams of carbohydrates and 4-5 grams of protein. In an airtight container it lasts around 6 months. It is even cheaper when bought in bulk. 

  • Beans: Beans are one of the most accessible protein sources and have been a staple around the world for thousands of years. Just one cup of soybeans, for example, contains a massive 28.62 grams of protein, while even standard baked beans contain around 14 grams. They also contain lysine, which is missing from most other plant sources.

  • Chickpeas: Chickpeas can be purchased very cheaply canned, and in large bags in bulk if you’re willing to prep them yourself.  Each cup contains about 15 grams of protein, tonnes of fibre as well as magnesium and folate. 

  • Lentils: Similar to chickpeas, lentils can be bought canned or in large bags as bulk products. A cup of cooked lentils contains a massive 18 grams of protein, they also lower cholesterol, improve heart health and help stabilise blood sugar. 

  • Oats: Oats are very cheap, can be bought in bulk and have great shelf life. They are high in protein, fibre, and B12; they are even thought to help lower blood pressure and cholesterol. 

  • Cereals: Most cereals, especially supermarket’s own brand products are very cheap. Whole grain cereals like bran or oat based products are high in fiber, calcium and iron, and most are fortified with B vitamins.

  • Pasta:  Pasta is another great product to always have on hand, it is one of the least expensive items in any supermarket, can be bought in bulk and has a very long shelf life. Depending on the type, pasta can be a good source of fibre and carbohydrates; it is a high energy food and is very filling.

  • Potatoes: Potatoes are one of the cheapest foods available in most supermarkets, at an average of just $0.56 per pound. They are versatile, filling and despite their reputation as unhealthy, they are an excellent source B6 and a good source of potassium, copper, vitamin C, manganese, phosphorus, niacin, dietary fiber, and pantothenic acid.

  • Sweet potatoes: Sweet potatoes are as versatile as white potatoes, are high in vitamins B6, C, D, iron, magnesium and potassium. They’re also a more balanced source of energy than white potatoes, as their natural sugars release slowly, avoiding blood-sugar spikes.

  • Noodles: Many varieties of noodles are vegan, they are very cheap and last a long time. Noodles are very filling and contain high levels of B vitamins, vitamin E, magnesium, iron, riboflavin, and calcium.

  • Nut butters: Depending on the type, nut butters can be purchased very cheaply and in large quantities. It has a surprisingly good shelf life, is an excellent source of heart healthy fats and is very high in protein. 

  • Falafel: Falafel is usually cheap to buy pre-made but it is even cheaper when made at home just using chickpeas and spices. It is filling, can be used to make great vegan burgers and is a good source of protein, fat and soluble fibre. 

  • Hummus: Though buying pre-prepared hummus is usually relatively cheap, it is far more cost effective to make your own in larger quantities, depending on the recipe you usually only need chickpeas, tahini and  lemon. 

  • Couscous: Couscous can be great in salad or as its own side dish, it is cheap to buy and is a convenient option since it is so easy to prepare. It is a good source of lean protein, dietary fibre and B vitamins. 

  • Tofu: Tofu has an odd reputation for being expensive, quite probably among people who have never bought it. Tofu has been a Chinese staple for thousands of years, it is now widely available in supermarkets and is far cheaper than comparable animal products, averaging less than $2 per pound. It is filling and is high in both protein and calcium.

  • Tempeh: Tempeh is similar to tofu in price and use, but has a different texture and slightly different nutritional properties. The fermentation process and its retention of the whole bean give it a higher content of protein, dietary fibre and vitamins compared to tofu, as well as firmer texture and a stronger flavour

  • Seitan: Seitan is made with wheat gluten and is extremely high in protein, as well as being one of the cheapest sources of protein per dollar when made at home and is around the same price as low quality beef in stores. It has a steaky texture and is very filling.

  • Frozen fruit/vegetables: Large bags of mixed frozen vegetables can be bought extremely cheaply almost anywhere. Despite popular opinion to the contrary, frozen vegetables are almost as healthy as fresh produce since they are frozen while fresh and don’t endure the loss of nutrients associated with long travel and extended shelf time. Frozen fruit like mixed berries can be a cheap way to prepare smoothies or dessert.

  • Canned fruit/vegetables: Having a few cans of fruit or vegetables around is always a good idea, things like canned peas or corn can be a side on their own, canned peaches or orange pieces are an instant dessert and canned tomatoes can be used to make sauces. 

  • Bananas: Bananas are one of the cheapest fruits available, especially when bought in bulk and deserve a mention based on their nutritional value and their versatility. They can be used in desserts, as a healthy snack and can be used to make cheap vegan ice cream.

  • Citrus Fruits: Citrus fruits like lemon, orange and limes are cheap to buy in bunches, especially when in season and can be eaten as a healthy snack or used as a cheap way to add flavour to existing dishes. 

  • Vegetable stock: Vegetable stock is good to have around for a variety of purposes; it will add flavour to any dish from gravies to soups and roast dinners. It is extremely cheap and relatively healthy if you go for a low sodium option.

  • Olives: Olives are a healthy source of fat, they are thought to have anti-inflammatory properties and contribute to good health health, as well as being good sources of iron. They can be bought in large jars very cheaply and can be a healthy snack. 

  • Olive Oil: Thought to be the healthiest oil to cook with, it is heart healthy and can be used to add flavour to a variety of dishes like pastas and salad.

  • Spinach: Spinach is often called a super-food in terms of nutritional content, it is is high in niacin and zinc, as well as protein, fiber, calcium, iron and a multitude of vitamins. You can also buy large bags of pre-prepared spinach very cheaply.

  • Kale: Kale has a different flavour and texture to spinach, but has similar uses. It is a great source of dietary fibre and is packed with nutrients, vitamins, folate and magnesium. Even a 500g bag should only set you back around $2.50. 

  • Bread: Many new vegans assume bread is off limits, but many breads are vegan. Even speciality loafs are very cheap considering the amount of meals they can contribute towards, and they can be a good source of carbohydrates and protein. 

  • Plant Milks: Plant milks have an undeserved reputation for being expensive, this is only in comparison to heavily subsidised dairy milks, though even then the price is comparable, in fact, some supermarket’s own brands are even cheaper. Plant milks are packed with calcium and are usually supplemented with vitamins B6 and B12.

  • Non-Dairy Spreads: Non-dairy spreads can be made form a variety of sources, from soy or olives to coconut oil. They tend to be comparable to dairy butter in terms of calcium, but without the unhealthy fats and cholesterol. They are usually priced similarly or cheaper than their dairy counterparts.

  • Peppers: Peppers tend to be very cheap to pick up in large bags, particularly bell peppers. They can be stretched over several meals, and can add flavour and texture to curries, stir fries and salads.

  • Nutritional Yeast: Seen as something of a speciality health food, nutritional yeast is actually very cheap, lasts a long time and is one of the best sources of vitamin B12. It has a nutty, cheesy taste, so you can use it in place of anything you’d usually sprinkle cheese on. It is also great in soups and when used to make “cheesy”, creamy sauces. 

  • Flax seeds: Each tablespoon of ground flax seed contains about 1.8 grams of  omega-3s. It is included in this list as they make a great egg substitute in baking, can be sprinkled on cereal, yogurt or oatmeal. It is cheap to buy, and even a small packet lasts a long time.
     
  • Dark chocolate: Dark chocolate is not only far healthier than milk chocolate, it is usually cheaper to buy in the same quantities and is far more filling. It is versatile for use in baking and desserts and is a healthy snack in small quantities.

  • Selected Produce: Fresh vegetables are not always expensive. Seasonal vegetables are usually cheap in most supermarkets, but some vegetables like carrots, turnips, onions, cabbage and cauliflower are inexpensive all year round, and can often be bought on offer or as “irregular” (but still perfectly edible) for even less.
     
  • Herbs and Spices: Having a range of spices on hand is always a good idea; things like cumin and garlic can add depth and flavour to simple meals and they last a very long time. Investing in a good spice rack and some curry powder will save you money in the long term.

not only does capitalism cause people to starve even though we have more than enough food in the world, but because of capitalism a lot of people who are satiated in terms of food quantity are still nutrient-starved.

food companies don’t want you to be healthy, they want to sell their food. so they add all sorts of chemicals, first to make it look and taste better, and then to make you crave more, and then to prevent you from feeling satiated, so that all you want to do is continue buying and eating that food.

so much of obesity and unhealthiness is because in general, people are uneducated about what they should eat and what they’re actually eating, and because the food industry does everything it can to obscure that information so people keep buying their products.

and THEN once people have gained weight and have dull hair and skin and nails, the cosmetic and fitness industries swoop in. they make you feel ugly and worthless and terrible, and then they offer you magical products and supplements and programs to make yourself better looking. 

these industries only exist to make money. they cause us to be overweight and sick, then shame us for it so that we’ll buy other products to counteract it, all while taking in money by the billions.

we’re living inside the prison of these industries, our brains and bodies being warped by all of these toxins and chemicals and psychological warfare, and people still try to argue that this is an economic system about freedom.

Fantasy Daddy Simulator -- Final Fantasy XV x Dream Daddy Headcanons (Part 1)

Okay, I’m far too impatient to wait until this is all finished. SO HERE! Have the first part to the FFXV x Dream Daddy headcanons. c: It’s fun to write, that’s for sure, and it’s cool to think about the fun scenario of all these single dads. I hope you guys enjoy the day I go on our Fantasy Daddies though!
(So weird to say that, not gonna lie…)


PREGAME NOTES

  • Let’s add about 15-20 years on these boys. Give them time for the children to grow older.
  • Let’s also say they live in that cul-de-sac area just like from Dream Daddy.
  • And the children are just me throwing dumb thoughts your way. Because yay for thinking up of headcanons (and child characters unmentioned!).

FANTASY DADDY SIMULATOR – FFXV x Dream Daddy (Part 1)

Featuring: Noctis Lucis Caelum, Prompto Argentum, Ignis Scientia, and Gladiolus Amicitia


Noctis Lucis Caelum – Divorced, Father of Three Boys

Likes: Fishing, Sleeping In, Telling Stories About The Good Ol’Days
Dislikes: Veggies, Cooking Heathy Things For His Kids, Not Being Able to Fish or Sleep

  • He was married to Lunafreya Nox Fleuret as part of an arranged marriage ordeal. But as time passed, they came to realize that they never really got the live they life they wanted to when they were immediately married at twenty-years old.
  • So they mutually divorced, yet they still remain very big and important figures in their kids lives, despite having a shared custody over them.
  • Noctis takes the kids for a month and then they alternate back and forth. But luckily for Noctis, Lunafreya just lives up the road, so they boys can really just pick where they want to go.
  • The boys ultimately decide that they’d rather live with their dad more than their mom. No offense to Lunafreya, really! They’re just, you know, more okay with Noctis being a chill dad than with Lunafreya being a proper lady mom.
  • Noctis is the kind of dad who will pretend to be asleep until noon on his days off, refusing to get up even when his little boys would jump on him and demand his attention.
  • Or demand food. Can’t they just make ramen like how Uncle Gladio taught them? Damn… Now he’d have to break out that emergency cookbook Ignis made him.

Keep reading

Foodstuffs in Morrowind and What They Taste Like

Ash Yams:  “Ash yam is a tough tuberous root vegetable…”

  These taste like sweet potatoes, although very grainy and with a tough outer skin that outlanders peel off before eating because it is both tough and bitter.  A true Dunmer would never dream of peeling off this skin.  They like it.

Bread:  

   Very common food, very basic.  Generally cooked in a wood-burning oven, the texture is baguette-like and extremely crusty.  The flavor itself is bland but palatable.  The amount of salt added to the dough depends on the region; water-rich areas tend to eat saltier bread.

Comberry:  "The comberry is a bush that produces a bitter berry, best known as the basis of the native comberry brandy, a rough but potent alcoholic beverage of Morrowind…”

   Similar in flavor to an unripe mulberry.  Except incredibly bitter, like you-just-licked-the-spout-of-a-well-used-Keurig bitter.  It sweetens during the fermentation process, however not by much.

Crab Meat"The mudcrab native to Vvardenfell is prized for its sweet crab meat…”

   Because mudcrabs are, at their smallest, the size of a large chihuahua, they usually produce enough meat to feed a modest family of three (elves don’t have many children).  Though all mudcrap meat is tough and chewy, the younger the crab the more tender the meat.

Hackle-Lo Leaf:  "Hackle-lo leaf is a tasty edible succulent leaf…”

   One of the most common vegetables eaten on Vvardenfell.  Though its shape and texture are similar to a fat kale leaf, its properties are more similar to a squash.  When left uncooked, it has a crispness and flavor like a cucumber.  Cooked, it tastes like sauteed zucchini.  Its versatility with spice and other foods is why it is preferred over other vegetables.

Hound Meat:  "Hound meat is the flesh of the nix-hound. The meat is sweet and tender…”

   Most similar to beef.  Nix-Hounds are much, MUCH leaner than cows, however, and so the meat they produce has a very low fat content.  Maybe that’s why all the Dunmer are so thin?  Or maybe they are constantly burning calories by scowling all the time?  Nirn may never know.

Kwama Eggs:  "Kwama eggs are a rich, nutritious foodstuff…”

  Large kwama eggs are the size of ostrich eggs, and small kwama eggs are the size of bigger-than-average-jumbo chicken eggs.  Whatever the case they’re bigger than a chicken egg, and if you wanted to scramble them for breakfast you’d just have to crack one open for a heaping plate.  The taste is yolky, but the yolk-to-albumen ratio is pretty even.  A waxier texture, it squeaks on your teeth when eaten.

Marshmerrow"The sweet pulp of marshmerrow reeds is a delectable foodstuff…”

   Fruity and sweet, it is served both raw and cooked.  The taste is honestly kinda like a marshmallow (believe it or not), but with an almost peachy undertone.  The raw, watery pulp is eaten with a spoon, but when cooked, it’s eaten with a fork.  To use the wrong utensil is a grave social mistake, as is every other action done by outlanders.  Like existing.

Rat Meat:  "Rat meat is tough and greasy, with an unpleasant odor and taste. Nonetheless, it is cheap, abundant, and nutritious, and palatable when cooked in a stew and masked by strong strong spices.”

   Texture is most like pork.  Eating rat meat in a stew is like eating the little meatballs in Spaghetti-O’s; you can eat it just fine when you don’t think about it.  It has high tryptophan content, so it makes you sleepy, just like eating turkey does.

Saltrice:  “Saltrice is another of the tasty and nutritious foodstuffs…”

   Though fibrous, it becomes easier to chew the longer you cook it, often by boiling (Dunmer need their colons cleansed, too).  Similar in flavor to cabbage, it is eaten both raw and cooked, usually as an additive to stews.

Scrib Jelly:   “…Crushed scribs produce a nutritious but sour-tasting gelatin… that the natives eat with gusto.”

   This is nothing like sweet pectin fruit jellies.  It’s like pork-bone-yellow-nasty-meat-gelatin.  But the coagulative properties come from the chitin (pronounced KITE-in) shell of scribs.  They don’t have bones.  It’s definitely an acquired taste, and it does grow on you with each successive mouthful.  The texture is like that of thick refried beans, and the flavor is that of mild buttermilk.

Scrib Jerky:  “Scribs cut into strips and dried in the sun are called scrib jerky… tastes scarcely worse when spoiled than when fresh, and are a practical foodstuff for the hardy native traveler.”

   Very chewy, very dry.  But all around not bad.  One of the most versatile foods in terms of flavors, it ranges from sweet to savory.  Scrib jerky produced in traditional dry-rub methods is incredibly salty and rather spicy, and is eaten regularly among the ashlanders.  In modern cities, the meat is marinated first in a usually sweet sauce, and it produces a more tender jerky, but it doesn’t last as long.

Scuttle:  “Scuttle is Vvardenfell’s favorite local dish. This cheese-like, greasy substance made from the flesh of local beetles is remarkably tasty…”

      Eaten with a knife and fork, it is generally reserved for those in the upper class, though all but the poorest Dunmer will find a way to eat it at least twice a year on special occasions.  A robust dish, it is comparable in texture to paneer.  The flavor is spicy, and it tastes like a Masala dish. 

Trama Root:  "A calming tea with modest magical properties is brewed from the thick, bitter-tasting root of the trama shrub…”

   Most similar in taste to Oolong tea.  Almost a smokey flavor, but definitely a woody undertone.  Perhaps more like an overtone.  No one eats the trama root itself, except for confused and inferior outlanders.  But the tea is good and is drank throughout the day, especially in the evening.

anonymous asked:

Since you're offering advice: What do you suggest to those of us for whom it is natural and automatic to leave "evaluating" comments? Lately I have erred on the side of simply saying nothing at all, though I feel there must be a happy medium. We are trained all through school to evaluate writing. The first fic site I was ever part of welcomed concrit. I love receiving concrit. I don't agree that it's universal bad etiquette to leave critique. Of course rude and entitled comments are bad. ???

I think it’s just a matter of changing your mindset to accommodate for the situation. You mentioned that in school, you were trained to evaluate writing– was this a writing school where both parties were offering up something to be critiqued and improved? That’s the first difference with fanfic– obviously there are a lot of writers that communicate with one another, but overall there are much more readers than there are writers. Therefore, it’s not equal to offer critique because you are not putting yourself in an equally vulnerable position with that other person. Yes, you love concrit but there’s no like… partnership. Is this making sense? Like I’ve been in writing classes before and in those, you do get to know and trust the people who are giving you concrit. And, you knew that one week they would be critiquing you, and the next you would be offering them suggestions. There was an equal vulnerability and an shared interest in improving.

This isn’t the experience of fandom. You don’t have that trust and partnership that is created in a writing club or school or smaller FF community. And, most importantly, some people honest-to-god aren’t looking to improve their writing. They’re just here to have a good time. Obviously, everyone improves naturally over time, but they aren’t looking for suggestions. They’re just sharing. 

I always like to think of fanfic in terms of cooking for people (i’ve made this analogy before but it works here too). If you were eating at a friend’s house and they asked, “Did you think there was enough salt in the sauce”, then by all means you would feel comfortable answering. Or if it was a good friend, you might even be comfortable saying “This is lovely– I think it would be even better with more mushrooms!” However, you would not go to a relative strangers house, eat their food, and then offer advice. Especially if you knew you would never see this person and they didn’t ask for it. It’s more polite to just keep it at “This is delicious, thank you so much for cooking!” (The best food is free food. Never complain about free food.)

In terms of curbing your natural response to leave concrit rather than just nice comments: In my writing class, I always learned to start with a few positive things before moving on to improvements they can make. So, leaving a positive comment means just cutting out that second half. Leave all those specific, positive good parts. There is nothing better than comments like “I loved your characterization of XX, It was lovely to see the depth in that character” or “Your writing was lyrical and detailed- I felt I could really see the scene unfold!” or “Omgg the line “INSERT LINE HERE” made me smile!” – All the skills of concrit are awesome when applied to positive comments. Just leave out the second half!

You’re right: It’s not universal bad etiquette to leave constructive criticism on a piece of writing. However, it is fandom bad etiquette to leave it on a fic where the author has not asked for it.

If you do love giving and recieving concrit, there are options! First and foremost, say that you welcome concrit in the notes of your fic so you can continue to receive it. In terms of giving it, offer to beta for people! This is the stage of writing when people want and need all the editing skills you have gained in school or elsewhere!

Thanks for the question– I hope this helped you understand where fic authors are coming from and some alternative ways for you to enjoy your fandom experience!

So if Locus did become a regular, he’d be a wallflower at the Reds and Blues’ parties, hanging out in stealth mode in the corner watching their malarkey.

What subject would come up that would make it irresistible for him to participate? @arirashkae​ said zombie plans.

Grif is on a tear, describing his strategy for the zombie apocalypse for the 500th time. “And that way, we have the best most defensible place to hole up. It’s fullproof!" 

Locus materializes, towering over everyone, with a sigh that’s more like a growl. “That plan doesn’t take into account long term food shortages and the inevitable increase in the zombie population as more humans die." 

Simmons clutches at his chest because he’s pretty sure he just had a heart attack.

hearthawk  asked:

Hey! I was wondering if I could poke you and see if you had any good ideas for bird of prey enrichment. In my new position, I wanted to make an enrichment calender with enrichment ideas for a collection of program owls, vultures, and hawks (and the poultry who share the holding areas). Do you give enrichment to your ambassador birds? What have you found they seem to interact with the most? Novel foods, novel items, textures, bathing options, and of course, training ideas?

Nice! Congrats on the new position, and good luck with the enrichment calendar. Raptors can be tricky to plan for, at least if you want a diverse set of enrichment. 

The following list is a variety of enrichment ideas I’ve either used or seen used on the raptors you are working with. It is by no means exhaustive, but it’s a good start. This post won’t go into great detail on how to do each of them, but if one catches your eye but the description is confusing, let me know and I’ll try to clarify. 

Basic Training: These are the basics. When it comes to raptors, consistency and routine are the biggest factors. If you can work the following into your basic training regiment every day or every other day, then your raptors will be enriched and learn valuable commands and behavior for vet care, handling, and presentation.

Keel Score and Touch Training: These two practices are crucial in training raptors because it gets them used to people, hands, and situations where they need to be held. It also trains the handler to do a thorough inspection of the bird every time its on their glove. Start with the keel and the feet, move to the beak and head, then try gently pulling their wings out or maneuvering their tail by hand. They wont like it at first, but if they get used to it, this can be invaluable for vet visits. 

Putting on and Taking off Equipment: Get the birds used to the anklets, jesses, leashes, hoods, and other equipment. Try to put it all on at least once a day. (Hood Training a raptor typically takes a more involved approach and should only started if you can really commit to the practice multiple times a day.)

“Step Up” and “Step Back”: Use treat rewards and repetition to teach each bird to step up onto a glove or perch when asked and step back onto a glove, perch, or scales when asked. Once learned, keep a habit of using the commands when weighing each bird every day. 

Jump Ups: These exercises both teach the birds to come to a gloved fist when called and if done in the right distances and elevations can be excellent exercise for them. 

Creance Training: If your birds are fully flighted, this is excellent training and exercise. It also helps prepare for flighted programs. 

Take a Walk: My team and I take our birds on walks at least twice a week. This gets them out of the enclosure, seeing new sights, and getting comfortable with their handlers. 

Owl Enrichment: Owls are largely solitary creatures with little to no food motivation. Much of their enrichment will revolve around stimulating their senses and appealing to their more destructive nature. Each bird will be different of course, so you’ll just need to try until you find which enrichment is the best received. 

Shredded Phonebooks: Setting up a partially shredded phone book or similar paper product can be one of the most enriching objects for large owls like the Great Horned Owl.

Cardboard Egg Cartons: Very similar to the above. (Really anything cardboard and shaped odd will do)

Towel Wrapped Perch: Some owls love to pick the threads off of towels. Wrapping part of a perch in a small towel can be entertaining. 

Live Prey: If the bird is fit and able, live prey is good enrichment. Insects like captive bred roaches or meal worms can be good as well. Try spreading the meal worms through long leaf astroturf. 

Feather Bundle: If you have old body feathers from a prior moult, tie them together and hang them in various places throughout the enclosure. Bonus if you can get breezes to move them occasionally. 

Audio Samples: This depends on the bird, but more social owls like the screech owl will get largely intrigued if you start playing their calls from various places on occasion. Try to get them to call back (Keep note of the call used and the response. Some are territorial calls or alarm calls, try to avoid those.)

Vulture Enrichment: These birds are usually social creatures with a large propensity for destructive behavior. Their food drive is okay, but the more intriguing the situation, the better. 

Food Puzzles: Try creating various puzzles and challenges for the birds to reach a tidbit reward. If its something they can destroy, even better. Look up “Striated Caracara Enrichment”, you’ll find videos by Elite Falconry. While Caracara aren’t really vultures, the puzzles are excellent for vultures and intelligent, food motivated birds. 

Hide and Seek: If it’s turkey vultures you’re working with, hiding smelly food can be a great enrichment option. Try hiding it in cardboard egg cartons or safely destructible items. 

Eggs: the occasional egg can be a great treat. 

Un-stuffed Stuffed Animals: Like the owls this, can be a great thing for the birds to pick and pull apart. just be sure the materials are plastic free and there is no stuffing in it. 

Mist Sprayers: We’re located in Central Texas. If you are in a place with plenty of heat, mist sprayers can be great afternoon enrichment. Typically the birds will step in the mist then go sun themselves until they dry off. 

Hawk Enrichment: The most food motivated of the group, these birds are most enriched by the challenge and reward of obtaining food. 

Food Puzzles: Simple puzzles can be great, but a word of warning. Most hawks have a poor sense of object permanence, so be sure any treat reward is visible at all times.

Treat Foods: Eggs, Day old chick, chicken leg, insects, etc… These should be given sparingly, but can offer a great change up from the typical feeding schedule. If you can, try offering a rotating diet of core meats the bird would eat in the wild and then sprinkle the above options into the mix for rewards and lazy days. 

Frozen Food: This is another hot summer option. It takes the birds time to pick apart the food enough to eat and can actually help shape their beaks and talons in the process. (Word of Warning, make sure the food in question is large enough that the bird cannot swallow it whole. If it does, this can lead to sour crop. 

“Tirings”: This is a falconry term for food objects that really aren’t all that edible, but take the bird time to pick apart. These can be bird wings, rabbit ears or feet, an even handmade lures with tidbits attached. 

Audio Samples: This depends on the bird, but more social hawks like the Harris’ Hawk or even birds like the Caracara will get largely intrigued if you start playing their calls from various places on occasion. Try to get them to call back (Keep note of the call used and the response. Some are territorial calls or alarm calls, try to avoid those.)

Live Prey: If the bird is fit and able, live prey is good enrichment. Insects like captive bred roaches or meal worms can be good as well. Try spreading the meal worms through long leaf astroturf.

Feather Bundle: If you have old body feathers from a prior moult, tie them together and hang them in various places throughout the enclosure. Bonus if you can get breezes to move them occasionally.

Minnows in the Bath: Putting minnows into their bath pan will keep many hawks fascinated and watching for hours. Some will even try to catch them. 

Swinging Perches: Install a tree branch that hangs from the ceiling by a rope. Every hawk I’ve offered this to has made it their favorite perch. 

Poultry: These birds are largely foragers, giving them stuff to pick at or eat that is more interesting than seeds is usually a great bet. 

Treat Foods: Meal Worms, strawberries, plain yogurt, Tomatoes, etc…

Foraging space: Real grass, bushes and open area.

Dust Bath: Try giving them an area to lay and role in some finer dust.

Percussion Instruments: A small, brightly colored xylophone mounted safely to a surface is certain to attract and keep interest. 


Hope this helps!