food pinoy

Filipina-British-American Immigrant

Hey everyone! I’ve been following this tumblr for a while and I love it. Not only has it addressed problematic representations of Asian people in the past, I have also learned a lot on portraying other non-Asian people of colour. I’m currently working on an alternate universe-dystopian novel where the Cold War turned “hot” but with people of colour as the main characters. I have come across novels that portray this, but it’s often from a white person’s perspective.

While I am fully Filipina by blood, I identify as a Fil-Brit-Am: born in the Philippines, lived in England for 12 years and currently live in America. Below is what I have experienced and/or observed.

Beauty Standards

Just like what some people have said on here, whiter = more attractive. In the Philippines, walk into any beauty store and you’ll instantly see tons of skin-whitening products. With women, pale skin was a beauty staple; with men, being handsome meant being “tall and dark”, but not “too dark”. In England, it was such a double standard. I went to a mainly white secondary/high school where for white girls, it was attractive to have tanned skin (the more tan = more attractive) while girls of colour were seen as the opposite. In America, you were “exotic” (my situation) or shamed.

Daily Struggles/Culture

Oh man. Balancing conservative Filipino values with those of the less conservative English was a struggle, especially going through puberty. While it was normal for my friends to hang out in the park after school everyday, date who they wanted and just get home before it was dark, my parents gave me a strict curfew (always way earlier than when my friends would go home) and pressured me to not date until finishing college. Back then, I resented my parents for what I saw as my lack of freedom. Looking back now, I understand why. We lived in a neighbourhood where crime was relatively high and during the time, it was also where a surge of immigrants from East Asia flowed into the UK. As you can imagine, our presence wasn’t welcomed. My parents were simply trying to protect me.

Dating and Relationships

For a lot of immigrants, education was THE way to progress to a more secure future. During my teenage years, my parents emphasized this with the whole “no dating until you finish college and have at least some form of a stable job”. They mellowed out after some time. In some talks with my mother, she said that my dad and her would prefer me to marry a Filipino because they would have a better understanding of our culture. However, if he is a good man, loving etc, the race wouldn’t matter. 

Food

In England, I discovered staples such as the “English breakfast”, cake with custard, scones, fish and chips, Indian curry while keeping to Filipino dishes at home (adobo, pancit anyone?). Even though I had the option to bring lunch to school, I decided to have meals from the cafeteria. Whether that was from a moment of other children thinking my lunch food was weird or I feared of being seen as different, I can’t remember. In America (with more diverse communities anyway), they’re more open to food of other cultures.

History Repeating in the Workplace

Philippines - you’ve guessed it: colonialism. From beauty standards to power, whiteness is seen as the best. Just like another poster has said, it makes me sad that Filipino culture has been eradicated through the ages and that I never got to experience it.

England and America - Having benefited from colonialism, there is a lot of colonial mentality (though subtle). From stories I’ve been told from my parents and their generation, this is common in workplaces. White people are fine working with people of colour until they hear that a person of colour is applying to be their manager. Then they suddenly have a problem (with the whole mentality of “people of colour can’t be leaders” crap). 

Identity Issues

With three cultures part of my identity, I never really knew what my identity was or even how to identify myself. I always had the feeling of “belonging everywhere and nowhere” at the same time. it was only until last year that I discovered a term for it: third culture kid (or fourth for me I guess). Third culture kids are people who have developed multiple cultures from having lived in multiple places: one from their parents’ culture, one they grew up in and the third being a combination of the two. It has helped me with my depression, as it stemmed from the fact that I had no label to call myself while everybody else seemed to. If you are like me, I would suggest the book Third Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds by Ruth E. Van Reken and David C. Pollock. It helped me a lot.

Misconception/Micro-aggression/Religion

In England, discrimination was more towards the Asian community (in particular, the Muslim community despite living there for a long time). In secondary school (high school), I had the typical comments of “chink” and talking to me in a mocking Chinese accent. I remember one time when a guy asked me where I was from - I answered “Philippines” and he immediately said, “so basically Japan?” *rolls eyes* 

As I was raised Catholic, the family went to church every Sunday. After some time, due to some pressure from my mother, I became an altar server. We became pretty close to the church community. What I didn’t remember is when we first attended mass, (as my parents told me later) they had openly looked at us with disgust. This shocked me as I couldn’t imagine the church goers being so mean. Talk about “loving your neighbour”. Makes me wonder what would have happened if I didn’t become an altar server…

Things I’d like to see less of

- Asian women being portrayed as submissive, shy, petite or as the Dragon Lady

- Asian women only being seen as scientists (with the whole smart, nerdy Asian trope). What about writers? Mechanics? Musicians? Leaders even?! One of my characters is an Asian woman who is an investigative journalist.

Thing’s I’d like to see more of 

- Asian people being friends with or at least, being respectful towards non-Asian people of colour (in particular, black people). It’s my hope that my generation and the ones after ours will bridge that gap.

- That writers of colour get more representation. 

I look forward to learning more from y'all!!

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“Over sa Sarap”- EraserHeads

trip ko lang i animate sensya na XD

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Asian American Food Mart

Lunch on Saturday 07/25/15

23 Veteran’s Plaza, Bergenfield NJ 07621  USA

T: +1 (201) 244-0944

This is a typical Filipino “sari sari” store set up: you can buy groceries and cooked food.  Most of the cooked food sold is for take out but there are 4 tables available if you care to eat there cafeteria style.

Eat in option is a ‘combo’ where you get rice and your choice of two dishes and if you like, a cup of soup.  You choose your food “turo-turo” (point-point) style: point to what you want.  Choices include a selection of fried fish, stewed pusit (squid), banana “hearts”, sayote, kaldereta (meat stew), tokwa’t baboy (tofu & shredded pork in vinegar/soy sauce), dinuguan (pork blood pudding stew), kare-kare (oxtail & veggie stew in peanut based sauce), pinakbet (squash, string bean, eggplant sauteed northern luzon style), chicharron bulaklak (fried chitlins), pancit canton, among other goodies.

I opted for sausages, tapa and tokwa’t baboy and added a side of kare-kare.  Lots of good food but it’s only a once in a while treat.

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We found ourselves at Kafé Batwan by Sarsá at Rockwell for lunch over the weekend. It was an unlikely choice by JodiesDaddy, but a good one. Lucky for me, because I’ve been wanting to try this out!

We had:
  • Madrid Fusion Super Batchoy - their take on the Filipino classic (and JodiesDaddy’s favorite Filipino dish) was served with kurobuta charsiu, a soft boiled egg, tuna skin with a 12-hour broth that still had that distinct batchoy taste. This did not disappoint!
  • Pancit Palabok - this was a very rich and “saucy” version of Palabok. I liked that the egg was runny (not a fan of hard boiled eggs), and that there was squid and crablets mixed into it.
  • Pinoy Fish and Chips - they used hito, instead of the usual Dory/Halibut.. And the menu distinctly mentions using San Miguel beer for the batter hehe. The chips were of sweet potato to give it a more Filipino twist.

Overall, the food and ambiance were great at Kafé Batwan. Next on our list is Sarsá.

I love flying Philippine Airlines! They’re often overlooked and underrated, but I find their service is always top-notch. So much better than other “award winning airlines”.

One thing they’re famous for is their “arroz caldo”, which is rice porridge with chicken. Had it today for the first time and it so lives up to the hype! So simple, but their preparation is warm, comforting, flavorful, reinvigorating… exactly what I needed for breakfast after a long night out and four hours of sleep. I added fried garlic, scallions and crispy fish to mine. Calamansi extract and salted egg were two other options.

I hope to be flying PAL more often now that I know this magical meal is included in the ticket price!