food and feasting

I watched NBC’s (edit : sorry for the HBO derpHannibal for a while and it was a really interesting serie overall (even if it got silly at times). I’m still very fond of the original movies, but the visuals on this show were gorgeous!

Miniprint made for TCAF.

Available on Etsy  (✿◕◡◕)

at night, a bowl of almonds from your mother’s teacup,
the refrigerator humming. in the morning,
cold golumpki, straight from the tupperware.

tell me what’s so bad about leftovers?
everything comes from something.

i mean, honey, chocolate truffles, cappuccino milk,
me. is it time that is meaningless, or is it the weather?

i admire nature, this mountaintop, the way it rains here,
like god is crying, but god is not crying.

do you remember when the sun came up?
my legs were on your legs. i was wearing tights
because it was cold. i was wearing shorts
because it should’ve been warm.

that was the harvest of you loving me.

in some hemisphere, it must be spring.
in that place, we feast. in this place, we eat.

Food & Feasting in Ancient Rome. The festive consumption of food and drink was an important social ritual in the Roman world. Known as the convivium (Latin: “living together”), or banquet, the Romans distinguished between specific types of gatherings, such as epulum (public feast), cena (dinner, eaten mid-afternoon), and comissatio (drinking party). Public banquets, such as civic feasts offered for all of the inhabitants of a city, accommodated large numbers of diners. Dinner parties that took place in residences were private affairs in which the host entertained a small group of family friends, business associates, and clients. Roman literary sources describe elite private banquets as a kind of feast for the senses, during which the host strove to impress his guests with extravagant fare, luxurious tableware, and diverse forms of entertainment, all of which were enjoyed in a lavishly adorned setting. Archaeological evidence of Roman housing has shed important light on the contexts in which private banquets occurred and the types of objects employed during such gatherings.

The dining room was one of the most important reception spaces of the residence. It included high-quality decorative fixtures, such as floor mosaics, wall paintings, and stucco reliefs, as well as portable luxury objects, such as artworks, sculptures, and furniture. Like the Greeks, the Romans reclined on couches while banqueting, although in the Roman context respectable women were permitted to join men in reclining. This practice set the convivium apart from the Greek symposium (a male aristocratic drinking party), at which female attendees were restricted to entertainers such as flute-girls and dancers as well as courtesans (heterae). A dining room typically held 3 broad couches, each of which seated 3 individuals, thus allowing for a total of 9 guests. This type of room is commonly described as a triclinium (“3-couch room”), although dining rooms that could accommodate greater numbers of couches are archaeologically attested. In a triclinium, the couches were arranged along 3 walls of the room in a U-shape, at the center of which was placed a single table that was accessible to all of the diners. Couches were frequently made of wood, but there were also more opulent versions with fittings made of costly materials, such as ivory and bronze. 

A proper Roman dinner included 3 courses: hors d’oeuvres (gustatio), main course (mensae primae), and dessert (mensae secundae). Food and drink were served, intended not only to satiate the guests but also to add an element of spectacle to the meal. Exotic produce, particularly wild animals, birds, and fish, were favored at elite dinners due to their rarity, difficulty of procurement, and consequent high cost, which reflected the host’s affluence. Popular but costly fare included pheasant, thrush, raw oysters, lobster, shellfish, venison, wild boar, and peacock. Foods that were forbidden by sumptuary laws, such as fattened fowl and sow’s udders, were flagrantly consumed at the most exclusive feasts. Elaborate recipes were invented - a surviving literary work, known as Apicius, is a late Roman compilation of cookery. These often required not only expensive ingredients and means of preparation but also elaborate, even dramatic, forms of presentation. Wine wine was served throughout the meal. This practice contrasted with that of the Greek deipnon (main meal), which focused on the food; wine was reserved for the symposium that followed. The wine was mixed to the guest’s taste and in his own cup, unlike the Greek practice of communal mixing for the entire party.

Like Father, Like Son.

Everyone felt it that day.

The castle was quieter than it should have been, and quieter than it had ever been before.

It was Father’s Day.
And someone was missing.

Breakfast was silent, and Keith didn’t e bother to show up. That had become the norm for the red paladin though.

Pidge sat quietly next to Hunk, eyes red from lack of sleep and probably crying too.

Hunk are slower than usual, looking around at the members of the table but never making eye contact.

Coran was trying to get Allura to eat something, for he knew how today troubled her. Alfor was gone, but this was her first Father’s Day without him after 10,000 years since the last.

Lance sat at the end of the table, away from everyone. He stared at his food goo but took no particular interest in actually eating it.

Shiro was missing, the most father like person he had was gone. His hero.

Lance and the others had planned it all out; once they found out when it would be in space.

They were going to make him a food goo feast, and have a sort of celebration in the training room.

The mice rehearsed a show, and everyone made gifts or cards of sorts.

It would have been the best Father’s Day once could have in space. That was until Shiro went missing weeks prior.

Lance was also missing Fathers Day back at his home on Earth, and he knew for sure the others did too.

They all had a Space Dad to miss, and actual Dad’s to miss. The castle was quiet.

The blue paladin stood, taking his plate and putting it in the washer. He wasn’t that hungry anyway.

With head bowed, he padded off to the observatory, where he had been everyday since Shiro went missing.

Everyone stayed away from each other, unless it was time for a mission or there was an attack.

Pidge in her room.
Hunk in the kitchen.
Keith in the training area.
Allura and Coran just… about.

As the door glided open and Lance entered, he let out a sigh and went to sit in the middle of the room.

“Show me Earth.”

The holographic map of the solar system covered the room, and right in front of Lance flowed Earth, brightest of them all.

Lance smiled sadly, “Hey there.”

He sat down, and just watched it spin in time. Lance wondered what it was like back there.

His mama would be cooking all day. Making snacks and dips and punches of all flavors.

His papa would be out, sent off away from the house as his day was prepared.

All of his brothers and sisters would be cleaning the yard, cleaning the pool, or cleaning the house.

It would be very busy.

Lance always preferred to stay in the kitchen and cook with his mother.

When father would come home, he would always scoop Lance up, no matter how big he was or how old he had gotten, and place him on his back.

“Lance! You ready to get in the pool?”

It was fun.
The blue eyed boy missed them.

His reminiscence was interrupted by the door open, and Lance looked up to see Coran approaching him.

“Lance, my boy, I saw you didn’t eat your breakfast this morning. Are you alright?” He came over and stood next to the boy, a twinge in his eyes.

The paladin smiled a bit, “I wasn’t really hungry. Thank you for asking, Coran.”

He turned and stared back at Earth, cheek resting on his knee.

A few ticks of silence based, and Coran broke it by sitting next to Lance. He tilted his head at Earth. “You know…”

Lance looked over at him.

“… I regard you like a son, Lance. I might not be Number One, or your Earth father, but I love you like my own and I want you to know that.”

Lance’s eyes widened a bit, looking to the red haired Altean next to him. “I… Thanks, Coran.”

The gorgeous man shrugged, “If you’d like I can take you to do some training.”

Lance groaned, “Keith is in there.”

Coran seemed to think for a moment and then looked to Lance with a grin, “How about we get in the pool?”

The blue Paladins heart skipped a beat and he sat up, staring at the Altean next to him.

How did he…?

Lance wiped his eyes, discovering they had teared up a little, and he smiled.

Coran wasn’t his biological family, but he was the next best thing. He remembered something he’d seen on a tv show once.

Family don’t end in blood.
Such wise words.

“Sure.”

Coran helped the boy to his feet with an offered hand, “I can show you how to flip the pool too, if you’d like.” He suggested as they walked.

He winked, twirling his mustache, “One thing you can know that Keith doesn’t to twist is undies, eh?”

Lance laughed, “Yeah, I guess so.”

He hadn’t laughed in forever.

Crystal King’s Feast of Sorrow brings readers into the kitchens of ancient Rome, where nobles and slaves jockeyed for position by using food as bargaining chips for personal and professional advancement.

The novel is based on the real life of ancient Roman noble Marcus Gavius Apicius, who is thought to have inspired and contributed to the world’s oldest surviving cookbook. But King tells her story from the point of view of a slave named Thrasius, a talented cook who is purchased by Apicius for the unimaginable sum of 20,000 denarii, about 10 times the yearly wages of a common soldier.

What Did Ancient Romans Eat? New Novel Serves Up Meals And Intrigue

When self care looks like a Thai food feast, let it.


When it looks like poetry
like stick and poke tattoos in your living room
like humidifiers
and space heaters
like comfy clothes
and hair dye
when it comes dressed as dental work
or routine bed times
or coffee dates
when it looks like bringing friends together
and dancing
like making art
and breakfast
when it comes looking like you
in every shade,
let it.