folds tutorial

5

Hey friends!

Sorry for the late TUTOR TUESDAY, but here it is! Today is on clothing folds and was a recommendation from @kitemist, thanks! If you have any recommendations you’d like to see send ‘em in here or my personal! Hopefully I can expand on clothes more soon! Keep practicing, have fun, and I’ll see you next week!

quick tutorial on clothing folds for people with no idea how to draw clothing folds

so if, like me, you’ve done all the research on how clothing folds, and you have a decent idea how the physics works, but you just can’t get it to look right?

change all your lines into this

im serious

it makes everything look so much more natural

for added realism, just add random bumps to the line wherever you put one

and there you go!

(please dont judge me for my anatomy i drew this in five minutes)

6

this was gonna be a tutorial and i guess it still is but if anything it’s just a really long and drawn out “essay” on drawing people with epicanthic folds. one of my biggest pet peeves is people drawing asian people exclusively with the same type of eye they’d give white people or anyone else who typically doesn’t have the fold! however i know that most people are taught with the standard white person eye (google image search for “eye” and it’ll all be pictures of white people’s eyes) so learning to draw epicanthic folds is a consciously learned thing. 

therefore i bring you this, which attempts to break the mechanics of epicanthic folds down into something that’s a bit easier to digest and implement in your own art! 

style can be argued i guess but it’s not that hard to stylize eyes with folds if you do proper observation and research. eyes with epicanthic folds are as diverse as eyes without so it’s not like you have to adhere to a strict model for them (although many people think that you have to) and all it takes to distinguish the two in stylized art (and even in semi/realism once you think about it) is a few lines! like i said this is a learned process but it’ll make your asian characters (and characters of other races even) a bit more interesting and believable.

7

I thought after drawing my Faithtale fanart I could do a tutorial on how to draw ribbons! I hope this is helpful :D

If you used that tutorial as a reference for your own picture/drawing, I would be glad if you would tag me so I can look at it! Feel free to share it (by reblogging or sharing the link!).

DON’T REUPLOAD IT ANYWHERE ELSE.

(Wenn du Deutsch sprichst: hier gibt’s das Ganze auch als Video)

anonymous asked:

hello! i've seen you give some art tips and I was wondering if you could give some for drawing folds on clothes (shirts and trousers mostly)? because I try but I can't get it right... thank you very much. I love your art!

I tried to make it as simple as I could ; v ; Hope it helps!

Right, here we go with my brand new series of tutorials, entitled How to THINK When you DRAW. I’m going to hit a massive range of subjects, techniques and approaches in this series, so there should be something for everyone, no matter what your interests or ability level.

Oh, and if you have any area of drawing that you’d particularly like to see a tutorial for, TWEET US HERE with your REQUESTS, and I’ll do my best to tackle them for you :)

The first two tutorials are looking at how to draw draping or hanging fabric and creases, enjoy!

Lorenzo!

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Per request by auroralei, a quick “tutorial” on clothing folds! I put “tutorial” in quotes because this won’t be a full tutorial on how to draw clothing folds (because I don’t fully understand them myself) but I’ll post some tips and processes I use to draw clothing. :)

For the first picture, I drew a ruffled skirt. In step 1, I drew the boundaries: where on the body does the skirt lie, how much will it flare out, and how long will it be? In step 2, I drew the bottom of the skirt as a wiggly line. 

In step 3, I drew the fold lines radiating upwards from the folds of the skirt. The fold lines should usually connect with the sharpest curves of the bottom wiggly line. And in step 4, I added more fold lines and shaded the skirt in. The shaded in areas are the areas that lie underneath other folds, where the unshaded lighter areas pop out. 

Notice the curvy U-shapes I included between some of the larger folds - this helps give softness and depth to what would otherwise be flat pieces.

You can extend this process to draw a variety of cute ruffles and pleats. I started here with a shape that was much more irregular and wiggly, meaning the end result will be more ruffled and have more folds. 

I followed the same process of adding fold lines and curves. Notice again, that the fold lines point towards the parts of the bottom line that have the sharpest points, or the places where the line changes from horizontal to vertical. These are the edges of the ruffle, so this is where the folds will be most pronounced. 

Also, don’t forget to erase any parts of the bottom wiggly line that get overlapped by the fold lines. Since I drew the entire bottom ruffle in the first step, it’s inevitable that some parts of the ruffle were going to be covered by others. Note the few places I erased between the second and third step.

Finally, I added a different kind of ruffle, and an important case to keep in mind. The skirt in the first picture and the ruffle drawn above are both drawn with the idea that the fabric flares outward - that is, it’s wider at the bottom than it is at the top. And with that, I have drawn the fold lines radiating from the bottom of the fabric. However, If the fabric is NOT wider at the bottom, but simply pulled in or cinched at the top, the fold lines are going to radiate from the cinched part of the fabric! Notice in the last sketch how all the fold lines are originating from what looks like an elastic band underneath the fabric.

Here’s an example of what close-fitting clothes might look like on the body. The amount of fold lines you use will vary based on how form-fitting or loose the clothing is, so this is somewhere in the middle. Notice how the majority of the fold lines originate from points where the shape underneath “changes direction”. Flatter areas like the chest and stationary areas like the upper arm and leg aren’t drawn with fold lines because the fabric is relatively undisturbed in those areas. However, the elbow, shoulder, and knee joints have plenty of folds, as well as the waist and breast areas, where the fabric abruptly changes direction.

I circled the shoulder and elbow area because it’s important to note that the fabric folds are originating from the armpit and inside of the elbow. There are the areas where the fabric is scrunched.

I circled the groin because when drawing jeans, there are usually a few fold lines originating from the center and radiating out like a star. however, in this pose, the hips are tilted and the model is not facing directly forward. Therefore, I drew these lines to be a bit asymmetric to help show the tilt of the hips and the direction of the legs. 

I also circled the knees because the fabric folds at the knees are slightly different. One leg is straightened, so the fabric bunches somewhat evenly at both sides. The other leg is bent, so the fabric folds originate from the point where the fabric is scrunched, and there are no fabric lines on the outside of the knee. 

On the right side of the figure, I drew and shaded some closeup examples of how bunched fabric may look. This is really hard to explain, and it’s something that I really just got the feel for through practice, but I’ll try. Remember the curvy U-shapes I mentioned earlier? (Well, I guess they’re V-shaped in places too.) I use these shapes extensively in bunched fabric to make the cloth look softer and more natural. 

The top example is a single fold, where the lighter areas pop out and the darker areas are the bunched up fabric between the fold. Below that is a layered pile of folds - it is the same shape but repeated. You might use this for a pushed-up sleeve or something. The bottom example shows the profile view of the fabric as it drapes around a curve - notice how I drew the little bumps and indents on the profile view. 

Well, that’s about all I’ve got to say right now (it’s been a really long day). If this helps anyone or peaks any interest, I’m happy to draw more examples and ideas! Feel free to message me if you have any questions or want to see anything drawn.

anonymous asked:

Can someone who works in a clothing store submit a clothes folding tutorial? Because i always feel terrible when i just cannot for the life of me fold things correctly and employees have to refold it! I'm pretty sure other people would appreciate it as well!

This is one I’ve posted in the past, but there are different methods. -Abby