folding-screen

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Folding Screen with the Four Continents
Mexico (late 1600s)
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Folding Screen with the Conquest of Mexico (front and back)
Mexico (late 1600s)
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Folding Screen with Indian Wedding and Flying Pole
Mexico (c. 1690)
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Here’s another way in which Asian and Latino cultures are connected: the adoption of Japanese folding screens (byōbu / 屏風) in Mexico (where they were called biombos).

LACMA says:

Japanese folding screens were first introduced to New Spain as exports by way of the Manila Galleon trade and by Japanese embassies that brought them to Mexico as gifts in the early decades of the seventeenth century. Known in Spanish as biombo–a Portuguese and Spanish transliteration of the Japanese word for folding screen, byōbu–the Mexican artform was inspired by its Japanese prototype.

The versatility of the folding screen contributed to its quick adaptation to daily life; because the biombowas freestanding, portable, multi-paneled, and could be painted on both sides, it provided an ideal surface on which to paint. Biombos transformed spaces into definable spaces, and were indispensable elements in domestic interiors. Today, folding screens are such an ubiquitous part of everyday life frequently used to divide rooms and spaces, as they were originally intended.

Night Festival of Tsushima Shrine
Japan (1624-1644)
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Stylishly Screened. Decorative screens are not just for dividing rooms and adding privacy. They are a great statement piece that can act as an alternative to hanging art in a room. Incredibly versatile, they come in a variety of sizes and finishes and act as a headboard, display family photos or be an instant update for any room. Bonus: DIY this statement piece using bi-fold doors and moulding.