flospiration

Periwinkles/Moroccan Garden, Henri Matisse, 1912, MoMA

This is another work that Florence instagrammed whilst at MoMA. 

Matisse was a 20th Century French artist. He worked during the time of Picasso and Duchamp and his art signaled a groundbreaking moment in modern art. He is known for his mastery of colour. 

Room 7: Bathroom

This glorious tin sculpture of Frida Kahlo (sold here) is in Florence’s bathroom. What could be cooler than Frida as a mermaid? Maybe only Florence as a mermaid, which she obviously secretly is. 

As I have said in previous entries, Florence has been inspired a lot by Frida’s art. She even named What the Water Gave Me after a Kahlo painting! Read about that here.

(Florence Welch House Series)

Room 1:

Keith Haring at Robert Fraser Gallery, Keith Haring, 1983.

I actually FOUND IT! It took some sleuthing, but this intriguing work that is hung prominently on Florence’s lounge wall is by Keith Haring, an artist who lived and worked in New York in the 1980s. He was a social activist and his art responded to 80s New York street culture.  

The work was sold at an auction house in London in 2011…one guess as to who bought it!

Even though I’m not a fan of this particular artwork, it’s really cool to see how vast and unpredictable Florence’s interests are - it’s obviously what makes her such an exciting and inventive artist!

(Florence Welch House Series)

Room 3: The Fireplace Room 

Frida Kahlo: Face to Face, by Judy Chicago and Frances Borzello.

This book is on the middle shelf of Florence’s bookshelves. Judy Chicago is an American Feminist artist whose artworks examine the role of women in history and culture. Her most famous work is The Dinner Party, which you can read about here. The work aimed to celebrate female accomplishments, and to stop women from being sidelined in history. Chicago’s book Frida Kahlo: Face to Face, aims to do the same, cementing Kahlo’s works within an art historical context. 

Frida Kahlo was an incredible Mexican artist who used her works to depict her cultural heritage and her experiences as a woman. I have already mentioned here that Florence was partly inspired by Frida Kahlo in her song What the Water Gave Me, here.

(Florence Welch House Series)

Room 3: The Fireplace Room

Well I’m back!!! I’m so sorry for my absence (essays and being sick got in the way).

You won’t believe how much luck I’ve been having with this room - I’ve been able to identify SO many of those books (my lucky bookshop eyes serve me well), so you will be getting loads of posts soon. I just love the fireplace and all of those lovely art books.

(Florence Welch House Series)

Room 7: Bathroom

Onto the next! The turquoise in the bathroom is absolutely gorgeous. I love the beautiful textiles Florence has hung everywhere. Also, I for one would LOVE a candelabra attached to my bathroom wall. Wow. Again, there won’t be much to blog about in this room but I will give it a go! 

(Florence Welch House Series)

Room 5: Bedroom detail

This Side of Paradise, by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Fitzgerald, we meet again! This is the final book in the room 5 detail of Flo’s US Vogue shoot. I have absolutely no idea what actual version of this book is on her shelf (usually I can hunt it down, but no luck with this one). 

I love this hardback edition. It was done to celebrate the 70th anniversary of Fitzgerald’s death. This Side of Paradise is described by Penguin books as a heartbreaking and beautiful portrait of the lost generation that followed the First World War. 

(Florence Welch House Series)

Room 3: The Fireplace Room

Starman: David Bowie the Definitive Biography, by Paul Trynka

This bio on David Bowie is also on Flo’s bookshelf. David Bowie is a hugely famous English musician (among many other things) who has been working in the industry for over 40 years. He’s most famous for the music he brought out in the 1970s, and for the altar ego he created called Ziggy Stardust. He is very much considered music royalty and a national treasure.

It is no surprise that Florence would love David Bowie’s alternative music style and the fantastical world he created to go alongside it. In this awesome interview with Baz Luhrmann, Florence talks about how she performed David Bowie’s “Rebel, Rebel” song at the Met’s Costume Institute Gala in 2011. She was even dressed as Bowie - bleached eyebrows and all! Much to my sadness, the Met don’t seem to film their performances, but I did find a small snippet of Florence rehearsing for the gig which you can watch here.

(Florence Welch House Series)

Room 3: The Fireplace Room

Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen.

This book is perched on Florence’s fireplace! I recognised it almost instantly because we sell the whole range of Barnes and Noble Leatherbound Classics at the bookshop. They are so beautiful.

For those who don’t know, Jane Austen was a fabulous English novelist who wrote romantic novels with a good dose of irony and wit during the 18th and 19th centuries (and she’s probably my all-time favourite author). Sense and Sensiblity is about the lives and loves of the Dashwood sisters - Elinor and Marianne and the problems of being ruled in love by your heart or your head.

Florence has tweeted a photo of herself reading Fashion in the Time of Jane Austen by Sarah Jane Downing, so she obviously enjoys Austen’s books and the Regency period!

(Florence Welch House Series)

Anonymous, Coiffure à l’Indépendance ou le Triomphe de la Liberté, c. 1778, Musée franco-américain du château de Blérancourt

Florence instagrammed a picture of this amazing print here. It is an 18th Century fashion plate of a fanciful woman wearing a miniature ship in her ‘powdered and pomaded hair’! This blog explains that, far from being just a novelty, these hairpieces 'celebrated specific naval victories and advertised their wearers’ patriotism and political acumen.’ How awesome! I'd love to see Florence wearing one of these.

Room 8: The (Narnia) Wardrobe

Another item in Flo’s wardrobe is this Meadham Kirchhoff ‘Calandra’ faux fur coat. The credit for this one also goes to theghostofalexander (thank you so much)! The colours are absolutely luscious and it looks incredibly soft. 

(Florence Welch House Series)

Room 5: Bedroom Detail

W B Yeats: Romantic Visionary, by William Butler Yeats.

Yeats was a 20th Century Irish poet. Yeats grew up in both Dublin and London, and was interested in Irish legends and the occult. His influences included Percy Bysshe Shelley and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. This book, which is another that sits on Florence’s bookshelf, is a collection of Yeats’s poetry from 1889-1939. 

This is a poem by Yeats I particularly liked:

A Coat

I made my song a coat
Covered with embroideries
Out of old mythologies
From heel to throat;
But the fools caught it,
Wore it in the world’s eyes
As though they’d wrought it.
Song, let them take it,
For there’s more enterprise
In walking naked. 


(Florence Welch House Series)

Room 4: The Kitchen

The Kitchen is the next room I will be looking at! It’s such a bright, open and sunny space. I love the sky light. I also love Florence’s big wooden table and all of her flower arrangements - very welcoming! There isn’t really very much for me to identify in this space, but I am looking at a couple of things. I’m pretty sure I know one of the paintings that she has pictures of on her fridge (it’s a favourite of mine)!

(Florence Welch House Series)

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Room 3: The Fireplace Room

Polaroids, by Helmut Newton

This book is on the middle shelf of Florence’s bookshelves. Helmut Newton was a German-Australian fashion photographer, particularly famous for his Vogue fashion shoots. Newton had an absolutely incredible life (at a young age he was sent to Australia and later became a British subject). Polaroids features hundreds of Newton’s test shots taken during photoshoots, giving readers an insight into some of his most incredible shoots for publications such as Vogue and Taschen.

(Florence Welch House Series)

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