florida-everglades

We often think of haunted places as spooky old houses or abandoned asylums, but what about an aircraft? One such case is that of Flight 401, an Eastern Airlines flight that crashed into the Florida Everglades on December 29th 1972 at approximately 11:42 P.M. The captain, along with one of two flight crew members, two of 10 flight attendants, and 97 of 163 passengers, died; 75 passengers and crew survived. The crash was a result of the crew becoming distracted by a minor problem (a burnt-out landing gear indicator light), and failing to notice that the plane was not on autopilot. They were unknowingly free-falling for more than 10 minutes. The last dialogue heard on the plane is surprisingly casual, and at least somewhat relieving to know that the causalities never knew what hit them:

 “Stockstill: Um, [pause] we’re still at 2,000 feet, right?”

  “Loft: Hey—what’s happening here?” 

-plane crashes-

Although the crash was disastrous, a lot of the non-essential equipment (i.e dinner trays, seats and hinges) were salvageable and were “recycled” onto other aircrafts in order to save money. After this, odd things began happening. On several flights, flight attendants and passengers witnessed the ghost of Captain Bob Loft walking in and out of the cock-pit before vanishing into thin air. On one occasion, the flight crew were so shaken by the experience that they had to cancel the flight. On another flight, a lady made a concerned enquiry to a flight attendant regarding the quiet, unresponsive man in Eastern Airlines uniform sitting in the seat next to her, who subsequently disappeared in full view of both of them and several other passengers, leaving the woman hysterical. More than 10 flights had reports of paranormal occurrences, and all these flights contained at least one part of the crashed plane. In 1981, all of these “haunted planes” were taken out of service in fears that a paranormal experience may cause another crash. It remains the only incident of a supposed haunted aircraft, and is as creepy as it is unusual.

#SaveTheEPA and #FirePruitt

Scott Pruitt spent most of his career obstructing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Now this guy leads the EPA and is destroying decades of environmental standards. Makes no sense. He is denying what scientists have proved to be real time and time again—Climate Change. I collected a few articles if you have the time to read through them. Talk about it amongst friends and expose him.

University of North Dakota apologizes for ejecting a journalist at the behest of EPA chief Scott Pruitt during an official visit:
http://www.westfargopioneer.com/news/4314077-und-apologizes-reporters-ejection-during-epa-administrator-visit

Pruitt’s EPA rolls back regulations on a pesticide that causes brain damage in children:
http://www.motherjones.com/food/2017/07/bill-ban-chemical-epa-pruitt-trump/

Pruitt’s EPA repeals Obama administration emissions restrictions:
http://www.overdriveonline.com/trump-epa-sets-sites-on-tractor-trailer-emissions-regulations/

EPA rewrites guidelines for evaluation of toxic chemicals:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/trump-rsquo-s-epa-may-be-weakening-chemical-safety-law/

Pruitt hires an anti-EPA lawyer who has sued the agency numerous times to lead its Water division:
https://www.eenews.net/stories/1060058019

New York sues Pruitt’s EPA for allowing dumping in the Long Island Sound:
https://www.courthousenews.com/new-york-sues-epa-allowing-dumping-long-island-sound/

Pruitt insists that Carbon Dioxide does not contribute to global warming:
https://www.cnbc.com/2017/03/09/epa-chief-scott-pruitt.html

Rundown of Pruitt’s 1st 100 days as EPA chief:
http://www.businessinsider.com/scott-pruitt-epa100-days-2017-4

Trump administration endangers our health with its EPA agenda:
http://www.theenergycollective.com/edfclimate411/2409875/trump-administration-outlines-plans-epa-bad-news-health

Pruitt’s EPA “out of control”:
https://www.dallasnews.com/opinion/editorials/2017/07/05/scott-pruitts-epa-spun-control

Chicago Sun Times editorial on Pruitt’s EPA:
http://chicago.suntimes.com/opinion/scott-pruitts-short-tenure-as-epa-chief-already-a-scandal/

EPA considers changing a rule regarding toxic mercury emissions from power plants:
https://thinkprogress.org/mats-delay-pruitt-trump-5c9ad958b44f/

EPA budget cuts threaten uranium cleanup in Indian lands:
https://www.revealnews.org/article/epa-budget-cuts-threaten-to-slow-uranium-cleanup-at-navajo-nation/

Scott Pruitt operates his EPA with lock-down secrecy:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/11/us/politics/scott-pruitt-epa.html

Editorial from the Chicago Tribune about how Pruitt has failed to go after egregious air polluters in Chicago:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/editorials/ct-edit-epa-0725-jm-20170724-story.html

Pruitt shirks on his mandate to enforce the law and collect fines from polluters (and how it will end up costing the taxpayer even more in legal fees):
http://www.businessinsider.com/scott-pruitt-epa-lawsuits-courts-2017-7

Pruitt’s EPA rolls back regulations at the fastest rate in the 47 years since the EPA was started:
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/01/us/politics/trump-epa-chief-pruitt-regulations-climate-change.html?mcubz=3&_r=0

A broad overview of Pruitt’s warped vision and his destructive administration of the EPA:
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/features/scott-pruitt-is-gutting-the-epa-serving-fossil-fuel-industry-w494156

Opinion piece from the LA Times on why Pruitt is a particularly dangerous operator:
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/topoftheticket/la-na-tt-hatchet-pruitt-20170702-story.html

Pruitt’s EPA cuts funds to clean up pollution in Houston neighborhoods:
http://www.houstonpress.com/news/houston-activists-join-task-force-to-fight-epa-head-scott-pruitt-plan-to-cut-superfund-budget-9637595

Pruitt caves to industrial interests and rewrite rules so that utilities companies can increase levels of water pollution:
https://thinkprogress.org/epa-rewriting-toxic-wastewater-rule-08a146b7f578/

The current EPA’s abominable record in enforcing environmental rules:
https://www.reuters.com/article/usa-epa-enforcement-idUSL1N1KW1SQ

Pruitt’s EPA website has no section about climate change:
http://mashable.com/2017/08/08/donald-trump-epa-website-no-climate-change-section/#BzNUIrc65iqy

Editorial from the Miami New Times on how Pruitt’s EPA will have a devastating effect on south florida’s coast and waters:
http://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/trump-epa-cuts-will-destroy-south-florida-beaches-soil-and-everglades-environmental-defense-fund-warns-9608031

Illinois paper column on how Pruitt’s deregulation of the coal industry pollution standards will damage Illinois waterways:
http://www.news-gazette.com/opinion/guest-commentary/2017-08-20/guest-commentary-rewrite-coal-ash-rules-threat-water.html

instagram

natgeotravel Photos by @CarltonWard // Here’s a time lapse of yesterday’s sunset in Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge, where the Everglades meets the Gulf of Mexico. South Florida boasts the largest contiguous protected mangrove ecosystem in the Western Hemisphere. On World Mangrove Day, let’s commit to protecting and restoring more of this endangered ecosystem. Throughout the world, mangroves are critical for fisheries, wildlife, and local communities. Mangroves also help combat climate change.

youtube

Omg this is my next fishing trip for sure…the end of this video shows why shark fishing is so intense.

Mother Nature’s poisonous plants to humans...

Monkshood (Aconitum napellus)

The most poisonous part is the roots, though the leaves can pack a punch too. Both contain a neurotoxin that can be absorbed through the skin. Early symptoms of poisoning are tingling and numbness at the point of contact or severe vomiting and diarrhea if it has been eaten. In 2010, a woman poisoned her lover using this plant. Apart from causing severe gastrointestinal upset, the poison slows the heart rate which can result in death.

Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum)

These weeds are massive and pretty hard to miss when they are towering over you.  The sap of the giant hogweed plant is phototoxic; when the contacted skin is exposed to sunlight or to ultraviolet rays it can cause severe skin inflammations. Initially, the skin colours red and starts itching. 

Blisters form as it burns within 48 hours. They form black or purplish scars that can last several years. Hospitalization may be necessary.  The presence of minute amounts of sap in the eyes can lead to temporary or even permanent blindness.

The manchineel tree (Hippomane mancinella) 

Found in northern South America up to the Florida Everglades and throughout the Caribbean. In some parts of its range it’s painted with a cautionary red cross. They grow little green fruits that were once called the ‘little apple of death’ by Columbus. 

The milky sap produced by this tree contains the powerful irritant phorbol. Just brushing past it can leave you with horribly scalded skin. Sheltering beneath it in a tropical shower can be disastrous too because even the diluted sap can cause an extreme rash.  Burning down these trees is also a bad idea. The smoke from a burning manchineel can temporarily blind a person and cause significant breathing problems.  While the effects are unpleasant, skin contact with this tropical tree can’t kill you. The real death threat comes from eating its small round fruit.  Ingesting the fruit can prove fatal when severe vomiting and diarrhea dehydrate the body to the point of no return.

Ricinus communis

Now well known thanks to Walter White in Breaking Bad. This plant is used to make caster oil.  After the laxative oil has been extracted the remaining residues of its mottled brown seeds contain a potent cocktail of toxins. 

Ricin kills by interfering in cell metabolism, the basic chemical processes needed to sustain life. The creation of essential proteins is blocked, leading to cell death. Casualties can suffer vomiting, diarrhea and seizures for up to a week before dying of organ failure.

source

Did you know: Alligators move three different ways on land. They high walk, belly walk and belly run. Alligators, like this one at Everglades National Park in Florida, high walk when they aren’t in a hurry. National Park Service photo. 🐊🐊