floral-motifs

So I’m reading this fic (translated) on ao3 and I’m literally dying because
1. Daneel possess green shorts with floral motifs and shirts with geometric patterns
2. Cleon is a fashion police and there are palace fashion consultants
3. Daneel is embarrassed about his fashion faux pas
4. Daneel is apparently particular about furniture
5. Also this is all canon

4

Battle Axe (Tabar-i-Zin)

  • Signed Blade: Al Hāj Hāji Mohammad Esmāil Arbāb
  • Dated: 19th century
  • Culture: Persia (Iran)
  • Medium: steel, gold, silver
  • Measurements: overall length: 75 cm; blade diameter: 18 cm

Steel axe with a crescent shaped head and single-edged blade. Both sides of the blade reveal a chiselled and gold encrusted decoration, with a large central cartouche filled by an inscription in nasta’liq or Persian calligraphy. On the outside of the cartouche there are two other with Arabic and Persian inscriptions.

Another motif of pearl friezes accompanies and defines some areas in the blade’s profile. This motif is repeated in the reverse of the blade. In the hilt the decoration is engraved and encrusted with silver in interlaced floral motifs, in a continuous pattern filling the whole surface.

The reading of the inscriptions allows identification of the axe’s age of manufacture, manufacturer and the royal commissioner who made the order. In these can be read:

On the right side of the axe, at the top (in Arabic): Yā Qādthi al Hājāt - ﻴﺎﻘﺎﻀﻰﺍﻠﺤﺎﺠﺎﺖ, meaning “Oh fulfiller of Wishes.”

In the middle (in Persian): Tabarzin be xun-e yalān gašte qarq -  ﺗﺑﺮﺯﻴﻦﺑﻪﺨﻭﻥﻴﻼﻦﮔﺷﺘﻪﻏﺮﻖ, meaning “The axe was bathed in the blood of the brave.”

On the right side (in Persian): Be farmāyeš jenāb-e Soltān Ašraf - ﺴﻠﻁﺎﻦﺍﺷﺮﻑ ﺟﻧﺎﺏ ﻔﺮﻤﺎﻴﺶ ﺑﻪ, meaning “By order of his Excellency, the King.”

On the left side (in Persian; the name of the weapon smith): Al Hāj Hāji Mohammad Esmāil Arbāb - ﺤﺎﺠﻰﻤﺤﻤﺪﺍﺴﻤﺎﻋﻴﻝﺍﺮﺑﺎﺏ ﺍﻠﺤﺎﺝ

On the left side of the axe, at the top (in Arabic): Yā Kāfi al Mohemmāt - ﻴﺎﻜﺎﻔﻰﺍﻟﻤﻬﻤﺎﺕ, meaning “O maker of great feats.”

In the middle (in Persian): Tabarzin be xun-e yalān gašte qarq -  ﺗﺑﺮﺯﻴﻦﺑﻪﺨﻭﻥﻴﻼﻦﮔﺷﺘﻪﻏﺮﻖ, meaning “The axe was bathed in the blood of the brave”.Čo tāj-e xorusān jangi be farq - ﭼﻭﺘﺎﺝﺧﺭﻭﺴﺎﻦﺟﻧﮕﻰﺑﻪﻔﺮﻖ, meaning “As in the crests on the heads of fighting cockerels.”

On the right side (in Persian): Be farmāyeš jenāb-e Soltān Ašraf - ﺴﻠﻁﺎﻦﺍﺷﺮﻑ ﺟﻧﺎﺏ ﻔﺮﻤﺎﻴﺶ ﺑﻪ, meaning “By order of his Excellency, the King.”

On the left side (in Persian; the name of the weapon smith): Al Hāj Hāji Mohammad Esmāil Arbāb - ﺤﺎﺠﻰﻤﺤﻤﺪﺍﺴﻤﺎﻋﻴﻝﺍﺮﺑﺎﺏ ﺍﻠﺤﺎﺝ

Source: Copyright © 2016 Caravana Collection

Quatrefoil Box

Indian, Mughal, circa 1650

Red, green, and white enamel with gold.

Whether indoors or out, the Mughal elite surrounded themselves with flowers. This lobed spice box of pure gold decorated with gleaming enamel was made to hold cardamom pods or stuffed betel-leaves (pan). Such delicacies were often, though not exclusively, eaten as preludes to amorous encounters. On the container’s lid, sinuous lilies and furling leaves sway gently beneath the bud of a ruby finial. Similarly delicate flower inlays adorn the Taj Mahal, the marble tomb of Shah Jahan’s wife, Mumtaz Mahal. The Taj Mahal’s four-part garden (chahar-bagh) plan is further evoked by the box’s quadripartite form.

Men’s Court Sash (patka)

India (Deccan), Mughal, 18th century

Cotton and silk

Man’s court sash (patka) of undyed plain-weave cotton with edges and ends embroidered with pink and red flowers within undulating stems; crosswise border (pallaka) at each end consists of a repeated pattern of individual flowers with curving leaves; fringe of gilt yarn at each end.

An important element of male courtly attire in sixteenth-, seventeenth-, and eighteenth-century India, the patka or girdle played a symbolic and decorative role comparable to the necktie today. Often the most lavishly decorated component of a man’s formal dress, the patka tied at the waist with the ends hanging toward the knees. The length of the ends and the position of the knot changed according to the fashions of the times. The ends of the patka, known as the pallakas, tend to be more elaborately and sumptuously ornamented than the central area, with lavish embroidery and metal thread. Because rulers often granted patkas as token of esteem, the sashes became symbols of political status as well as emblems of wealth and good taste.