fleurons

7

Tomb of Anthemia

Naoussa, Greece

3rd century BCE

This is a graceful, two-chamber monument with an Ionic facade of four semi-columns which support the entablature and the pediment. In the pediment’s hollow, a semi-declining couple is depicted in fresco. The three fleuron points which decorate the pediment retain their intense red and blue colours untouched, while the whole vaulted roof of the antechamber is painted with water lilies and fleuron (anthemia) in white and violet tones on a light blue background. The tomb gets its conventional name from these flowers.

The facade’s entrance was blocked by simple stone plinths, while the passageway from the first to the second chamber used to close with a monumental two-leaved marble door, which today we see fallen to the chamber floor. Inside the main death chamber, a four-sided stone base is preserved which contained some kind of metal vessel or reliquary with the bones of the dead.

4

                 The Grand Symbol ( The Great Monstrance of Arfe )

“The most important object kept in the Chapel of the Treasure is the great Monstrance of Arfe, also known as La Gran Ostensoria de Toledo. Made of the finest silver and gold and bejeweled with gems, it measures over ten feet tall. The monstrance is famous for being used in the annual feast of Corpus Christi of Toledo.The creator of the Great Monstrance was the metalworker Enrique de Arfe, born Heinrich von Harff, originally from Julich or Harff near Cologne, Germany.[28] Arfe labored on it from 1517–1524, on commission to Cardinal Cisneros. It is of late Gothic design. This triumph of the silversmith’s craft is in the form of a Gothic temple, with all the architectural details, such as columns, arches, and vaultings, the whole resembling a delicate lacework. Scenes from the life of the Saviour are illustrated in relief. It has two hundred and sixty statuettes of various sizes, all exhibiting the same skill in workmanship.[29] The Great Monstrance has a hexagonal base, and rises on small exquisitely made columns, with adornments of gems and varied figurines of angels and saints, fleurons, small bells and clappers. The work is crowned in the uppermost section by a 17th-century cross. The pedestal on which it sits is in the Baroque style of the 18th century. Originally made of silver, Archbishop Quiroga commissioned its gilding to match the gold plated wood of the monstrance of the altar; it was gilded in 1595 by Valdivieso and Morino. Today it is encased under bulletproof glass and heavily guarded by an automatic security system within the grounds of the cathedral.”

6

heget’s Silmarillion Sigil Set

your daily dose, (38/?)

Disclaimer: Here is a blend of Original Tolkien creations (aka my best efforts at recreating the author’s drawing), modifications on the original, and designs completely from cloth.

Please credit if use.

In order:

Tar-Míriel, Voronwë, Sea Leafing 01, Sea Leafing 02, Kamon Blue, Brandy-lily

Previous Entries:

  • HERE is the master-list.

Notes:

The first two are requests for crocordile.

  • Tar-Míriel who should have been the fourth Queen. For her sigil I had a simple design goal. I took Elros’s sigil, which is a simplification of the Númenórean sigil nightmare, and leeched away all color. Partly because of Tar-Mírel’s connection to the White Tree Nimloth, but also as a call-forward to the flag of Gondor with white on black. Also she grew up and then suffered through Númenor’s decline and darkest days. Not a lot of color nor joy. Some of the shapes are the thin-throat lilies coming down from Idril, but most come from the Númenor sigil itself. Nothing of Sauron or Ar-Pharazôn the Golden - in fact now that I check it has the same palette as the Valar.
  • Voronwë was the other request that I felt comfortable to execute- as I had already made Aranwë, based off of Lalwen. Which comes from a mildly popuar fanon that Aranwë was either Lalwen’s son or husband to expand Voronwë’s comment in one draft that he was a lord of the House of Finwë. Which honestly could just mean Voronwë and his family were sworn to the service of the royal family - which he was as a vassal of Turgon. Still, having Aranwë show a connection to Lalwen via the sigils was a fun idea, of which I explain away as Aranwë being Lalwen’s steward or first ranking noble supporter. Thus Vornowë’s high position among the Noldor. Of course on his Sindarian mother’s side he is possible kin to Círdan. And Voronwë’s most important deeds as as sailor and then friend and guide to Tuor, and sailor again. So the golden antler-like shapes of his father (but only 4), but on the blues of the ocean like Eärendil.

The next four I made with no particular character in mind, though as a group they would work well for Amanyar elves.

  • The greens are pale aspens and sea-foam, which can be a color of the Teleri (Falmari or otherwise). But the rest of the sigil are gold-lined leaves on white, which is Vanyar. Not just the gold on white, but the use of iris-like leaf clusters. So it is the sigil of a  high-ranking Vanyar noble. Perhaps one that fought in the War of Wrath and worked closely with the Teleri navy that transported them (which the two groups had limited connect before the War of Wrath but would have a very close working relationship during the 50 years at the end of the First Age). In fact, it is quite easy to imagine an OC Vanya general falling in love and marrying on of the Teleri captains that worked logistics to supply and transfer the troops of the Army of the Valar that defeat Morgoth and usher in the Second Age. The second sigil has darker blues in a sun-ray pattern and fits the feminine circle as opposed to the masculine diagonal lozenge. Thus one of the most interesting families of the Second to Third Age, the blonde mariners that speak in a soft slow sing-song Quenya as they visit ports in Númenor and bring back the lays of Beleriand- the widely popular Lay of Leithian and Narn i Hurin and stories of the Edain. And then I was stumped at what to call the pair of sigils, which others can attest to. In the end I went with a terrible pun, so they are Sea Leafing 01 and 02.
  • Kamon Blue. It’s blue. The design is a straight copy of a roundel fleuron, and it has eight points and can fit in a circle so it would work for a noble lady, probably Noldor. Simple, clean, monochromatic, also vaguely like a kamon. Which, yeah, the elven heraldric devices Tolkien created seem as much like Japanese mon as they do European coat-of-arms.
  • Brandy-lily. Narrow lilies in brandy and crimson, with light yellow green stalks and leaves, and some matching stars (no, not just something for the Fëanorian eight-point star on the doors of Moria -which doesn’t even match the eight-point star on Fëonar’s sigil. Stars of every style and point from 4 to 16 fit across the board for every single tribe. They are all the Eldar who love the stars: Vanyar, Noldor, Teleri, Sindar, Silvan, even Avari). The floral structure is something that fits with the other non-royal Vanyar sigils - the monks and farmers and soldiers I have made. Though these Minyar monks, I have the feeling, know how to party hard. Someone has to be the monks that (re-)invent champagne.

Ilsée, Princesse de Tripoli.
Auteur : Robert de Flers. (1872-1927).
Les 132 lithographies, la couverture, les dix lettres ornées, les fleurons et les cul-de-lampe ont été composés par Alphonse Mucha.(1860-1939).
Illustrations réunies en un volume.
Date d'édition : 1897.
Source : Bibliothèque Nationale de France.

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2

Tomb of Anthemia, MacedoniaGreece

Naoussa, Greece

3rd century BCE

This is a graceful, two-chamber monument with an Ionic facade of four semi-columns which support the entablature and the pediment. In the pediment’s hollow, a semi-declining couple is depicted in fresco. The three fleuron points which decorate the pediment retain their intense red and blue colours untouched, while the whole vaulted roof of the antechamber is painted with water lilies and fleuron (anthemia) in white and violet tones on a light blue background. The tomb gets its conventional name from these flowers.

The facade’s entrance was blocked by simple stone plinths, while the passageway from the first to the second chamber used to close with a monumental two-leaved marble door, which today we see fallen to the chamber floor. Inside the main death chamber, a four-sided stone base is preserved which contained some kind of metal vessel or reliquary with the bones of the dead.