flathead-national-forest

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I started off on a drive today that started as a trip to a local drive-in for a nice burger. 
Well, the air-conditioning felt pretty nice so I decided to go for a little bit of a drive and ended up taking about a 3 hour drive though the mountains and through a little bit of Flathead National Forest. 
There were so many amazing things to see along the way, but perhaps the most startling and overwhelming was the section of Flathead National Forest that was just miles and miles of burnt up trees.
At the end of the day, I’m really happy I decided to go on this very random and very rough drive. 
I’m also really happy my little Chevy Cavalier survived the rocky terrain.

theatlantic.com
The Benefits of Living Alone on a Mountain

“You really have to love solitary time by yourself.”

Filmmaker Brian Bolster profiles a fire lookout named Lief Haugen, who has worked at a remote outpost of Montana’s Flathead National Forest since the summer of 1994.

theatlantic.com
The Benefits of Living Alone on a Mountain

Could I do this job, I’d like to think so but I don’t know. It is definitely a beautiful place to live.

Click the link, watch the video.

Via The Atlantic:

Filmmaker Brian Bolster profiles a fire lookout named Lief Haugen, who has worked at a remote outpost of Montana’s Flathead National Forest since the summer of 1994. It’s a lonely job, Haugen explains, but the perks are unlike anything you’ll find in a city. “To be a lookout, you really have to love solitary time by yourself,” he says. “This is a reminder of keeping it simple. It’s just me and this place and the work.”

If you’d like to learn more about the life of a fire lookout, I recommend you read Fire Season: Field Notes From a Wilderness Lookout by Phillip Connors. It’s a lovely book. You may also enjoy this short documentary about the science of fighting wildfires.