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Fiquei muito feliz ao ver as fotos e os vídeos em que os garotos do Super Junior pegam a bandeira do Brasil, já faz um tempo.. mas continuo sentindo a mesma felicidade quando vejo essas fotos. - Sinto orgulho dos kpoppers brasileiros~! E queria ter a sorte que alguns tem de poder ir em um show de seu k-group favorito. Enquanto eu estou aqui, feliz em apenas ver vídeos das apresentações, mas um dia o sonho se realiza, continuo tendo fé. Não só eu, mas acho que todos os kpoppers que sonham em ver seu/s bias e seu grupo favorito. Aos poucos, nós vamos conseguindo, sem desistir.
화이팅~! (Hwaiting~!) ♥

The green of the flag that the Brazilians brought represented the forest that civilization has torn from us; we live like pariahs, crushed. The yellow, represented the wealth of Brazil, today absent; they tore everything, all in the name of civilization. The white, which symbolized the peace so desired, today is absent in man kind. And, finally, the blue, which represented  the sky, in its florescent beauty – stars and planets shining -, was the only thing that civilization left to the indian, and only because she hasn’t managed to conquer it, yet …
—  Marcal Tupã-i | Guarani leader | Killed by European Brazilians in 1983.
Lessons from Usain St. Leo Bolt

Let me seh dis, I hope we will ALL learn the lessons that ‪#‎UsainBolt‬ has taught us.

How to -
1. Be gracious
2. Show appreciation to your hosts - he also carried the flag of Brazil
3. Be Thankful - he was constantly bowing and waving to the full stadium
4. Have fun and when to have fun. Delay gratification
5. Put in the necessary work to achieve excellence
6. Not EVER be satisfied with where you are.
7. Keep working on raising your personal bar of excellence
8. Invest wisely and also in your country
9. Be humble but confident
10. Respect your parents no matter your age or your financial worth
11. Set goals
12. Be Jamaican

If every STUDENT, WORKER, SELF-EMPLOYED PERSON, PARENT…IF EVERY JAMAICAN APPLIED HERSELF AND HIMSELF THE WAY Usain St. Leo Bolt has and does WE would be rid of ALL OUR PROBLEMS!

After running the 200 metre sprint and creating history at the Olympics in Brazil.‪#‎Rio2016‬

Written by:  Fae Ellington (Jamaica’s Veteran Broadcaster)

My parents were illegal immigrants and we didn’t tell anyone

I was born in Boston in 1995, the child of two Brazilian expatriates who’d decided to leave their country after the election of Collor de Mello, a red flag that showed Brazil’s political corruption wasn’t changing anytime soon. My parents arrived legally in the United States, but like many other immigrants, their visa expired — after they’d already built a life in the States. As time passed, glimpses of hope came in the form of American politicians who promised immigration reform. My mother hung on to their words in hopes that this time they’d follow through, that this time there might be a new path toward legalization that didn’t cost thousands of dollars that my parents didn’t have. By 1997, my parents were raising three kids on the wages of illegal immigrants, and the process of legalization was extremely expensive. So I grew up with a secret that sometimes even I questioned if I could handle.

By: KP Gusmao