five borough

10

Yemeni bodega workers in New York rally around being American, Muslim and proud

  • An estimated 1,000 Yemeni-American-run businesses, restaurants and bodegas in New York’s five boroughs shut their doors at noon Thursday for eight hours in an act of protest against Trump’s recently imposed travel restrictions.
  • And as night fell on the rally at Brooklyn’s Borough Hall scheduled to take place in tandem with Thursday’s bodega closings, show up they did — by the thousands, waving American flags and bearing signs that declared “We need justice.” Read more
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BOOK OF THE DAY:

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer

“No spoilers here, but we will say that the book–which includes a number of photographs and some eccentric typography–ends with what is undoubtedly the most beautiful and heartbreaking flip book in all of literature.” –Booklist

Oskar Schell is unlike any nine-year-old you will ever meet. Bright and quirky, it is safe to say he is a little weird. He makes jewelry, he speaks French, he plays the tambourine, he is a Shakespearean actor, jeweler, pacifist, vegan, historian and correspondent with Stephen Hawking and Ringo Starr. When his father passes away in the September 11th attacks, Oskar is left depressed until he finds a mysterious envelope with a key, titled, “Black” in his father’s closet. Filled with inspiration and hope, Oskar embarks on an adventure to find the lock of the key. During his journey, he travels through the five boroughs of New York, where he meets interesting characters with their own survival stories. What begins as an innocent, heartfelt testimonial of loyalty to his father, ends up as a heartbreakingly beautiful climax, which leads to his father’s grave.

Although the plot seems rather thin, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is far quirkier than you believe. Reflecting Oskar’s intellectualism, Foer’s writing is experimental. With several back stories, including the Hiroshima and Dresden bombing, as well as others’ stories of trauma, Foer’s writing is intuitive: it lacks punctuation and shifts narrative. It contains eccentric, illegible typography (where the words are mounted on top of each other) blank pages, pages with one liners, sweet monologs, illustrations and scribbles. Although it may be perceived as gimmicky, it is highly stylistic and unique.

Without a doubt, Foer’s delicate style adds to the sentimentality of the novel. Make no reservations here, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close will make the coldest heart shed a tear. Foer has created a prose on the exploration of grief and healing. As a result of the highly sensitive topic and young narrator, there are no mild feelings procured here, you will feel a gut-wrenching beautiful ache or a bitter taste in your mouth. Note, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Closenavigates two extremes of the spectrum, between beautiful sadness and manipulation.

Read excerpts from the book here!

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Yemeni-Americans to shut down New York City bodegas in protest of Trump’s Muslim ban

  • New York City’s Yemeni-American bodega owners will shutter their shops at noon Thursday in an act of protest against Trump’s travel ban.
  • According to a Facebook page associated with the protest, an estimated 1,000 stores are expected to close across all five New York boroughs from noon to 8 p.m. Thursday.
  • “Originally, we considered starting the shutdown at 8 a.m., but the grocers they made it clear they wouldn’t be willing to close if that meant their regulars wouldn’t get their morning coffee,” Debbie Almontaser, board member of the Muslim Community Network and one of the rally organizers, said in a press release. Read more

Hundreds of public school teachers in New York City have landed tickets to the hottest show on Broadway.


Some 400 teachers from schools in all five boroughs will attend Wednesday night’s performance of the sold-out, Tony Award-winning musical “Hamilton.”


The teachers were selected by the city’s Department of Education and via a lottery held by Teach For America-New York, a nonprofit educational organization. Barclays is also involved in the performance for educators through a partnership with the organization and the Education Department.


The Broadway show’s organizers hope the musical’s message of diversity and inclusiveness will resonate with educators and their students. […]

businessinsider.com
Queens has more languages than anywhere in the world — here's where they're found

There are as many as 800 languages spoken in New York City, and nowhere in the world has more than Queens, according to the Endangered Language Alliance (ELA).

“The capital of linguistic diversity, not just for the five boroughs, but for the human species, is Queens,” Solnit and Jelly-Schapiro write.

Investing in the Future: Life in the Kept Lane

I noticed that as I’ve spent more time reading the experiences of other sugar babies, escorts, and sex workers on here that being spoiled really looks different for so many people. With those differences obviously come different trajectories. Thorin and I sat down on January 1 and we had our fiscal check in, something we do fairly regularly. Here’s the shakedown of what being kept looks like in my corner of the world, in a way this is kind of quantifying what many people have disputed as being unreliable or more emotional labor, or what have you. 

Thorin and I moved into a spacious, renovated two bedroom apartment (which I picked out) in one of the five boroughs last summer. Although both of our names are on that lease, the agreement is that if we break up, he will leave and I will find a roommate since this apartment is walking distance from my job. In terms of our expenses…

He covers ~ 

  • rent 
  • utilities
  • household expenses (furniture, fixing things, etc.)
  • date nights (movies, restaurants, clubs)
  • some* shopping trips
  • liquor (we drink a lot, this is definitely its own expense)
  • pretty much everything else

I cover ~

  • groceries and Seamless (try to limit to twice a week)
  • small household expenses
  • shopping online about things I’m picky about
  • my cellphone

Now our financial / life plan is as follows…

Summer 2017 - 

  • Get engaged (I set his limit on a ring at 8k because I’d prefer to put that money towards a home, plus I don’t like diamonds so it’ll be much cheaper.)
  • Send out Save the Dates for destination wedding in the Caribbean

Summer 2018 -

  • Destination wedding in the Caribbean (we are members of a luxury all-inclusive vacation club so it will be cheaper to do it there, plus it’s a self-limiting guest list). Budget is 30k, with both of our parents most likely contributing around 10k each, so a final budget of 50k.

Winter 2018/2019 -

  • Close on our first property together, either an apartment or a luxury condo in Brooklyn or Queens. Budget is 500k. 

2019-2022 -

  • Build capital to purchase a second property, preferably in a more suburban location. Start preparing our apartment or condo for becoming a rental property we will retain. Goal is to build a down payment of at least 100k for second property. 

Winter 2022/2023 -

  • Close on second property and move - budget will probably be somewhere between 600-800k is my guess.

Fall 2023 -

  • Start trying to get pregnant to have first baby by Summer 2024. <3 

Alright, so based on the texts I got, messages received, and forty-two anons (I GOT THE ARISTOTLE ONE YEESH :)) I made a list of all the books mentioned. 

• Song of Achilles
• Captive Prince Series
• The Rifter series by Ginn Hale
• magpie lord by K J Charles
• Him by sarina Bowell
• Shattered Glass by Dani Alexander
• Stockholm Syndrome by Richard Rider
• Roads series by garrett leigh
• Five Boroughs series by Santino Hassell
• Simon vs the homo sapiens agenda  by becky albertalli
• how to repair a mechanical heart by j c lillis
• The Five Stages of Andrew Brawley
• nightrunner series by Lynn Flewelling
• Temptation series Try, Take, Trust
• Alexander the Nice guy series
• Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

• don’t let me go by J.H Trumble

• cut and run series- Madeline Urban
• Hope Cove Series- Cate Ashwood
• SSU Boys-Maris Black
• Ivy Years Series-Sarina Bowen
• Southern Scrimmage Series-Mercy Celeste
• Aidan and Ethan-Delvin and Garrick-Cameron Dane
• Black Reek Series-Riley Hart
• Better Than Series-Layne Hayes
• Straight Guy Series-Alessandra Hazard
• First and Forever Series-Alexa Land
• Firehouse Six Series-Draven St. James
• Nothing Special Series-A.E. Via
• Chase the Storm-V.M. Waitt
• Fated Heart Series-Aimee Nicole Walker
• The Misadventures of the Family Fletcher by Dana Alison Levy
• Dancer of the Dance-Andrew Holleran
• Carry On (and series)- Rainbow Rowell
• Ask the Passengers
• All for the game series. first one is the foxhole court and its free on iBooks
• Freakboy is a novel written in verse about a genderqueer teen and a trans woman of color
• The Tameness of The Wolf
• Brothers of the Wild North Sea
• The Cranberry Hush
• Beauty Queens-Libba Bray
• Afterworlds-Scott Westerfeld
authors:
• Sarina Bowen
• Ella Frank
• Mary Calmes
• A.M. Arthur
• Eli Easton
• M.J. O’Shea
• Felice Stevens
• L.A. Witt
• Lisa Worrall
• cordelia kingsbridge

Blogs for more lists: 

weneeddiversebooks 
yainterrobang.com


….lets go read!

5

Today Yemeni bodega and restaurant owners across the five boroughs closed up shop in protest. My little corner of Brooklyn has many Arab and Muslim-owned businesses—especially Syrian, Lebanese, and Yemeni (shout-out to my beloved Damascus Bakery!)—so I wasn’t surprised to see several of them shut today, including the one I go to most frequently.

But the streets in my neighborhood were bustling this afternoon: I passed big groups of people holding flags and signs and heading towards Borough Hall, where a solidarity rally would be held this evening. I showed up before the official start time and hundreds of people were already there, packing the steps of Borough Hall and waving American flags. I saw someone say later that they’d never seen so many American flags at a protest, and I’d say the same. It was an endless sea of red, white, and blue.

I’ve always had the privilege to scoff at flag-waving patriotism. Two generations removed from immigration to this country, it’s something I could always take for granted. But I’m hard-pressed to remember a moment where I’ve watched people chant “USA! USA!” and wave American flags and felt so moved. It doesn’t take much for me to cry these days, but still. To embrace a country whose government is actively trying to reject you—to cheer for it wholeheartedly—takes an extraordinary amount of courage.

A man held a sign that said: “Brooklyn my home. Brooklynites my family. United we stand.” Fellow New Yorkers: let’s make sure we fight like hell to let him know that we feel the same way about him.

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Manhattan looking north -  Manhattan looking south

Manhattan Island is approximately 13.11 miles long, though other estimates put it at 13.4 miles long. The 13.11-mile distance runs from The Henry Hudson Bridge in the north down to Battery Park in the south.  Manhattan is only 2.3 miles wide, notes NYC The Official Guide. The borough is not very big, considering that the population was approximately 1.8 million people in 2015, according to the Department of City Planning for the City of New York. That is equal to about 67,000 people per square mile. The borough is divided into avenues, mostly running north and south, and streets that mainly run east and west.

It is the most populated of the five boroughs, and is one of the top tourist attractions in the United States. Times Square is one of the country’s most famous tourist attractions, with approximately 50 million visitors each year. 

Can’t-Miss NYC Eats for the Newly-Made New Yorker (Part 1, Manhattan)

“As the college application season comes to a close, thousands of students around the world have decided that New York City is where they want to live and learn. For the unfamiliar, New York City has a tendency to overwhelm. And with more than 20,000 restaurants and eateries spanning the five boroughs, it can be difficult to determine exactly where and what you want to eat. So, I’ve compiled a list of what I believe to be some of New York City’s best spots to grab a bite. Bear in mind, this list is catered to college students who can’t afford to dine at four-star restaurants. 

  • Eataly: 200 5th Avenue, near Madison Square Park and the Flatiron Building. This gourmet market stocks a myriad ofItalian specialty goods, as well as conventional and exotic produce, homemadebreads and pastas, fresh meat and seafood, several sit-down restaurants, arooftop brewery and bar, and a café that serves homemade gelato and bakedgoods. One can easily spend an entire afternoon in Eataly, but be warned: thisbastion of gastronomy is not always the most frugal option.
  • Dominique Ansel Bakery: 189 Spring Street, SOHO:Home of the famous “cronut,” this bakery specializes in complicated Frenchdesserts, but also offers sandwiches, salads, soups and ice cream. You cannot go wrong with anything on the menu here.
  • Momofuku Milk Bar: 251 East 13th Street: one of David Chang’s many NYC institutions, goodies from this eccentric sweets shop have probably appeared on your Instagram feed a few times. Most flock to the Milk Bar to try their “Compost Cookies,” “Cereal Milk,” “Crack Pie,” and cake truffles. This bakery also offers cake-making classes, where you yourself may learn how to recreate some of their famous desserts.
  • Levain Bakery: 167 West 74th Street, a healthy walk from Barnard and Columbia! Levain lives up to all the hype. Anyone who knows anything about NYC knows that Levain is THE place for cookies. And these aren’t your average, rinky-dink little Chips Ahoy—cookies from Levain are big, chunky, and full of flavor. Levain also sells freshly-baked breads and pastries, but the cookies are what put this bakery on the map.
  • Doughnut Plant: 220 West 23rd Street, Chelsea. Head here for creative takes on the standard breakfast treat that are guaranteed to satisfy. Flavors rotate and differ based on location (they have many outposts throughout the city,) but frequent favorites include tres leches, carrot cake, and chocolate blackout.
  • Rice to Riches: 37 Spring Street, Nolita. If you’ve ever lamented the underrepresentation of rice pudding in the New York food scene, I have good news for you. Rice to Riches is a one-of-a-kind rice pudding bar offering seasonal and year-round flavors, as well as unconventional toppings, such as chunks of toasted pound cake. Buy yourself an 8 oz. “solo” bowl, or bring 10 friends and tackle the 80 oz. “Moby” bowl.
  • Veselka: 144 2nd Ave, East Village: You might not have expected to find a Ukrainian diner and coffee shop on this list, but hear me out. Veselka is a staple of the East Village frequented by celebrities and commoners alike. The restaurant is open 24-hours, so you can get handmade pierogis and Eastern European specialties such as stuffed cabbage and potato pancakes at 3AM after a long night of uh, studying. Lovingly prepared soups, breads, and pastries are also menu mainstays.
  • Magnolia Bakery: 401 Bleecker Street, West Village. Chris Parnell and Andy Samberg love Magnolia’s cupcakes, which are quite good, but this bakery’s true claim to fame is the banana pudding. Let me tell you, if I could fill an Olympic-sized swimming pool with any single item, I would fill it with Magnolia Bakery’s banana pudding.
  • Big Gay Ice Cream Shop: 125 East 7th Street, East Village. As if you didn’t immediately fall in love with this place based on its name alone, BGIC has some of the best ice cream in the city. Their best-selling cone, the “Salty Pimp,” consists of creamy soft serve vanilla ice cream with dulce de leche, sea salt, and chocolate dip. It’s absolutely divine, but every single item on their menu is a revelation. Lines are long in the summer, but if you’re lucky, some friendly drag queens will keep you company as you wait outside the store. No, I’m not kidding.
  • Russ & Daughters: 179 East Houston Street, Lower East Side. R&D is a traditional appetizing store that opened in 1914 to cater to Jewish immigrants. This does not mean, however, that you have to be Jewish to enjoy their legendary smoked fish and bagels. Though you may wish to convert once you try one of their signature sandwiches. Don’t miss the homemade babka and rugelach, either.
  • Katz’s Delicatessen: 205 East Houston Street at the corner of Ludlow, Lower East Side. I don’t have to tell you about Katz’s, because chances are, you’ve heard of it before. Yes, Katz’s is a little bit expensive, a little bit cliché, and a little bit tourist-y, but their food makes up for all of this. The pastrami, corned beef, and brisket sandwiches are a religious experience.  Just make sure you order your cold cuts on rye with a schmear of mustard, because any other preparation would be an adulteration of the highest magnitude.
  • Shopsin’s General Store: 120 Essex Street, located inside the Essex Street Market. I’ve got four words for you: “macaroni and cheese pancakes.” I’ve got three more words for you: “glazed doughnut sandwiches.” I’ve got six million more words for you, because the menu at Shopsin’s is more than 900 items long. But be forewarned, it’s very difficult to get a seat, your party cannot be more than four people, and it’s not unlikely for customers to be verbally assaulted while they eat. Don’t you just love New York?!
  • Vegan Divas: 1437 1st Avenue. Okay, you probably haven’t heard of this place and you’re probably wondering why I’ve included a vegan boutique cafe on this list when we all know that butter and eggs make the world go ‘round. But Vegan Divas holds a special place in my heart. I first discovered this cafe and bakery in 2012 after I was displaced from my Long Island home by Hurricane Sandy. Okay, I wasn’t displaced, my house was fine, but we had no power and I was hella bored. So there I was, wandering aimlessly around the Upper East Side desperately searching for a wifi signal when their dainty blue awning somehow caught my eye. I’m not a vegan, I’m not even a vegetarian, but for some reason, I felt compelled to go inside. And I am so glad that I did! Vegan Divas offers a wide variety of low-calorie baked goods as well as salads, sandwiches, breakfast items (their granola is stellar) and beverages. The tofu chocolate mousse, chocolate chip cookies, double chocolate brownies, lemon raspberry muffins, olive oil corn muffins, and cinnamon sugar doughnuts are so insanely delicious that you won’t even remember that they’re devoid of animal products. I don’t have a bad thing to say about this place. The way to my heart is with anything from Vegan Divas.
  • Ellary’s Greens: ellarysgreens 33 Carmine Street, West Village. “Health food” restaurants aren’t typically what you’d recommend to a friend who’s seeking out New York City’s essential eateries, but Ellary’s Greens is a sentimental favorite of mine. It’s where I fueled up before participating in my first LGBT rally (which took place around the corner at the Stonewall Inn). It’s also one of the few restaurants in a city that prides itself on pushing the boundaries of gluttony and gastronomy where you can get a delicious, hearty meal that won’t leave you belly-up in a pool of drool on the bathroom floor. Kidding, of course, but the truth is that anyone can make something yummy using butter, bacon, cream, and eggs; only an adept chef can produce food that is both tasty and nutritious without relying on those aforementioned culinary crutches. Ellary’s Greens is fit for meat-eaters, vegetarians, pescetarians, and vegans alike, with many dishes that cater to the lactose and/or gluten intolerant, as well as an array of housemade baked goods and freshly-squeezed juices. I recommend the tofu curry, any of the salads and vegetable sides, the “zinger” shot, and the avocado chocolate mousse. If eating healthy ain’t your speed, try the bacon mac & cheese… I hear it’s pretty good.

anonymous asked:

Heya! I'm super anticipating the next addition to the Cyberlove series (FOUR DAYS) and since I love that series so much I was wondering if you had any recommendations kinda along the same vein? No worries if you don't as that's kinda vague, I'm just wanting some awesome read to tide me over until Monday! (I might just reread the first two to prepare, let's be real though). Hope your day is great! :)

Honestly, the best thing i can rec is to keep on going with Santino Hassell if you haven’t already! I read Strong Signal because of Megan Erickson - I’m a fan of her m/f and m/m NA - and after I read it, I had to dive into his books too, specifically the Five Boroughs series. If you’ve already done that, though, check out Off Campus by Amy Jo Cousins while you’re waiting! No cyber-plot, but I feel like the dynamic of those characters fits in well.  

2

Portraits of an Ex-Lover

It wasn’t until your absence that I realized all five boroughs vanished when your body was nearby. The sweeping lines of the Brooklyn Bridge became the widespread veins on the backs of your habituated hands. The scent of the waves in your hair replaced the palpable saline perfume sprayed by the Atlantic on Coney Island.

It wasn’t until your absence that the romance of the spineless wind against my back when the C train arrived gave me chills. I had a longing to kiss the mouths of the buildings that licked the sky.

It wasn’t until your absence that I fell in love again.

Daredevil fic writers!

Want to write fic, but not totally clear on the New York details?  Fear not, my friends; here’s the relevant 411.

New York City consists of five boroughs: Manhattan, Brooklyn (hi Steve!), the Bronx, Queens (hi Peter!), and Staten Island.

Manhattan is the long skinny island between New Jersey and Brooklyn.  It’s the heart of NYC and in fact was all of NYC until 1898 - the others were separate cities until then.  People in the outer boroughs still sometimes refer to Manhattan as “the city.”  But you don’t really have to worry about the other boroughs at all for fic purposes, because everything on the show takes place in Manhattan.

Hell’s Kitchen is a neighborhood in Manhattan.  It is not a separate borough, or city, or suburb.  It’s not even a very big neighborhood.  It’s located on the west side of the island, in Midtown, and stretches north-south from either 59th or 55th Street (depending on who you ask) to 34th Street and east-west from 8th Avenue to the Hudson River.  (See the red rectangle on the map below.). That’s about one square mile.  It’s small.

Columbia University is also in Manhattan, in a neighborhood called Morningside Heights.  It’s also on the west side, about three miles from Hell’s Kitchen (the avocado on the map), just south of Harlem.  It’s about a 30 minute trip by subway.

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