fishing on the river

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Shengsi, an archipelago of almost 400 islands at the mouth of China’s Yangtze river, holds a secret shrouded in time – an abandoned fishing village being reclaimed by nature. These photos by Tang Yuhong, a creative photographer based in Nanning, take us into this lost village on the beautiful archipelago.

Waterfall-draped mountains encircle Hanalei National Wildlife Refuge on the Hawaiian island of Kaua’i. The winding Hanalei River feeds wetlands that are home to five endangered water birds: the koloa maoli (Hawaiian duck), the ‘alae ke‘oke‘o (Hawaiian coot), the ‘alae‘ula (Hawaiian moorhen), the ae‘o (Hawaiian stilt), and the nēnē (Hawaiian goose). Photo by J. Waipa, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

One of nature’s most social and playful creatures, river otters have big personalities and even bigger appetites. Often seen in groups, they can be observed hunting and frolicking year round at Loess Bluffs National Wildlife Refuge in Missouri. In winter, you might even catch them sliding across the ice on their bellies. Photo courtesy of Kenny Bahr.

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Giant otter feasting, Brazil

Giant otters are a great indicator species- one that shows the health of the ecosystem. Why? Because each adult otter needs to eat about 4kg/8lbs of fish every day. These otters live in family groups of up to 20 individuals so collectively require a huge amount of fish to support them. As a result, the presence of giant otters on a lake or river indicates a very productive area. I filmed this family fishing in the Northern Pantanal, Brazil, on assignment for @stevewinterphoto, @natgeo and @natgeowild