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Septima Poinsette Clark (May 3, 1898—December 15, 1987)

Originally posted by roricomics

Septima Poinsette Clark was a civil rights and education activist. Originally barred from teaching in Charleston, SC schools because she was Black, Clark petitioned for that right in 1920. She won. And she did it while teaching children during the day and adults at night in a nearby town. MLK Jr. refers to her as “The Mother of the Movement”. 


Mae C. Jemison (October 17, 1956)

Originally posted by francavillarts

Mae C. Jemison was not only the first Black woman in space, she was the first Black female astronaut for NASA ever. She launched in the Endeavor in 1992, just 25 years ago. 


Maria Weems (1840—?)

Originally posted by smithsonianlibraries

Above is Anna Maria Weems, a woman who escaped slavery by posing as a male. With a $500 reward for her capture, Weems spent over two months on the road until she found freedom in Canada. This art comes courtesy of the Smithsonian Libraries’ (@smithsonianlibraries) yearly celebration of BHM, which includes stories, art, personal histories, and lots more from their massive collection.

Follow these too:

  • Black Women Art (@fyblackwomenart​) has been around since 2012 (!), giving anyone who follows them a regular dose of art featuring Black women.
  • Badass Black Women History Month (@bbwhm​) is a brand new Tumblr celebrating badass Black women every day for Black History Month. Hell yeah.

There are more in the search results, of course. More Black women in STEM, in music, in sports, standing up for their rights, and have you read up on the Motorcycle Queen of Miami? One thing to note: some of these posts aren’t just highlighting women from 10, 20, 30, 100 years ago. They’re also highlighting Black women today, because Black women are still making history. 

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Sheila Abdus-Salaam, the first black female judge in the New York State Court of Appeals and the first female Muslim judge in the United States, was found dead on April 12, 2017. Sheila Abdus-Salaam was born Sheila Turner to working-class parents in Washington DC on March 14, 1952. Her inspiration to become a lawyer came from the TV shows she loved as a girl and from Frankie Muse Freeman, a civil rights activist and lawyer, who visited her school. Among her many accomplishments, Sheila Abdus-Salaam made the groundbreaking decision in a case that allowed LGBT parents to pursue equal parenting rights. 

Lacking a final statement from a medical examiner or a suicide note, the police and the media have still been quick to label her death a suicide, citing that she was ‘stressed at work.’
We can only wait for further investigation and hope that she receives as much justice in death as she offered to the world in life. For the time being, until we know the results of the investigation, SAY HER NAME.

Sheila Abdus-Salaam.

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Google doodle honors Bessie Coleman, the first black woman in the United States to earn a pilot’s license

  • When Bessie Coleman took flight in 1921 she didn’t just break the glass ceiling — she soared tens of thousands of feet above it.
  • At the time, Coleman was the first black woman in the United States to earn a pilot’s license. 
  • And as she ascended into the sky that day, all of the people who doubted her, who discriminated against her for her race and gender, would become smaller and smaller until they disappeared out of sight.
  • “The air is the only place free from prejudices,” Coleman once said.
  • On Thursday, Google commemorated Coleman’s 125th birthday with a doodle showing her plane doing loops and turns to spell the search engine’s name. Read more 

follow @the-movemnt

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For Refinery29’s celebration of Black History Month we put together a list of Black men and women you ought to know. Their legacy in civil rights, feminism, and LGBTQ equality lives on today.

  1. Bayard Rustin — A leading Black figure in the civil rights movement and advisor to Martin Luther King, he was the architect of the 1963 March on Washington and was heavily involved in the first Freedom Rides. He was also gay and a registered communist who went to jail for his sexual orientation. Although widely heralded, he was attacked even by fellow activists for his faith in nonviolence, unapologetic queerness, and attention to income equality. President Obama honored Rustin posthumously with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013.
  2. Combaheee River Collective — A seminal Black lesbian feminist group active from 1974-1980. Although officially short lived, its influence has been major. The group is best known for writing the Combaheee River Collective Statement, an important document in promoting the idea that social change must be intersectional — and that Black women’s needs were not being met by mainstream white feminism and therefore must strike out on their own. Members of the collective included Audre Lorde and…Chirlane McCray, now First Lady of New York City and author of the landmark essay “I Am a Lesbian,” published in Essence in 1979.
  3. John Carlos, Tommie Smith, and Peter Norman — The winners of the 1968 Mexico City Olympics 200 Meter Sprint. In one of the proudest and most political moments of sports history, John Carlos and Tommie Smith raised their leather-gloved fists in the Black Power salute. They wore black socks without shoes to represent black poverty and a scarf and necklace to symbolize “those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the middle passage.”

    We also include in our list Peter Norman, the white Australian silver medalist from that ceremony, to commemorate his solidarity with the two Black athletes. White people are more than indebted to black history, and Norman is an excellent example of a white ally. Although he didn’t perform the black power salute, he publicly supported the duo without regard to personal safety or retribution. Norman was penalized for his alliance with Carlos and Smith and was never again allowed to compete in any Olympics despite repeatedly qualifying. Largely forgotten and barred from major sporting events, he became a gym teacher and worked at a butcher shop. At his funeral in 2006, John Carlos and Tommie Smith were his pallbearers.
  4. The Friendship Nine — This group of nine Black students from Friendship Junior College willingly went to jail without bail in 1961 after staging a sit-in at McCrory’s lunch counter in Rock Hill, South Carolina. They pioneered the civil rights strategy “Jail, No Bail,” which placed the financial burden for racist incarceration back on the state. They’re appreciated today for their bravery and strategic ingenuity. In 2015 their conviction was finally overturned and prosecutor Kevin Brackett personally apologized to the eight living members of the group.
  5. Barbara Jordan — A lawyer and politician, Barbara Jordan was the first Black woman elected to the Texas Senate after Reconstruction, the first southern Black woman to be elected as a US Senator, and the first Black woman to deliver a keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention. Her keynote address is widely considered the greatest of all time, aided by her charismatic and eloquent public speaking skills. She is also remembered as one of the leaders of the impeachment of Richard Nixon. We chose the above quote to illustrate her unique punchy sense of humor.
  6. Pauli Murray — This civil rights activist, feminist, and poet was a hugely successful lawyer who is also recognized as the first Black female Episcopal priest. Like many figures on this list, Murray was acutely aware of the complex relationship between race and gender, and referred to sexism as “Jane Crow,” comparing midcentury treatment of women to that of African Americans in the South. Although she graduated from Howard University first in her class, she was barred from enrolling as a postgraduate at Harvard because she was a woman. Instead, in 1965 she became the first African American to receive a JSD from Yale Law. Once armed with a law degree she became a formidable force in advancing feminist and civil rights. She is a cofounder of the National Organization for Women (NOW). She also identified as having an “inverted sex instinct,” which she used instead of “homosexual” to describe her complicated gender identity and lifelong attraction to women.
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Sasheer Zamata quit ‘SNL,’ proving TV’s race and gender problems are more systemic than ever

  • It was big news in 2014 when Sasheer Zamata joined Saturday Night Live and became the show’s first black female cast member since Maya Rudolph’s departure seven years earlier. 
  • But it’s even bigger news that Zamata, 31, is now leaving the show after just four seasons.
  • Before she joined, black male cast members like Jay Pharoah or Kenan Thompson did impersonations of black women on the show, roles that they both eventually shunned openly. 
  • Once she joined the cast, Zamata churned out crowd-pleasing impersonations of Taraji P. Henson, Nicki Minaj, Rihanna, Lupita Nyong'o and Michelle Obama. 
  • As a black woman, Zamata’s casting was supposed to fill a gaping hole in the show’s cast. 
  • But her short stint on SNL is a clear example, perhaps more than any other, that there are no so-called “quick fixes” to the problem of racial and gender inequity on television. Read more (Opinion)

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Mary Jackson (1921-2005) became the first black female engineer to work for NASA in 1958. She started out as a human computer in the segregated West Area Computing division, but rose through the ranks to eventually achieve the most senior engineering title available.

She began work at NASA in 1951, and became interested in a career in engineering after starting work at the Supersonic Pressure Tunnel. She managed to obtain the title after attending graduate-level night classes alongside her work, and in the process helped advance the rights of both women and people of colour in the workplace. She was played by Janelle Monáe in the 2016 film Hidden Figures.

comedians of color everyone should know about

- Aziz Ansari: pretty famous actor, appears on Parks and Rec and other comedies, and has a few specials on Netflix
- Ali Wong: amazing lady, has her own special in Netflix (a lot of physical humor she did while SEVEN MONTHS PREGNANT she is badass and so funny)
- Eric Andre: hilarious dude, has his own mock talk show on adult swim with Hannibal Buress. Also was on Don’t Trust the B in Apt 23, one of the only people to make that show bearable.
- Donald Glover: also known as Childish Gambino (yeah, THAT Childish Gambino), has a special on Netflix
- Hannibal Buress: former writer for both 30 Rock and SNL, was on Broad City, and of course, the Eric Andre Show.
- Retta: this lady KILLS with her humor. you probably know her as Donna Meagle from Parks and Rec.
- Kumail Nanjiani: This guy has been everywhere, most notably to me, Portlandia. He’s insanely funny.
- Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele: Y'all know about Key and Peele don’t even lie
- Sasheer Zamata: SNL’s first black female cast member since Maya Rudolph, also OH MY GOD she is one of the only people who can make me laugh out loud.
- Richard Ayoade: You probably know him from The IT Crowd (all of which is on Netflix), but this guy is so talented you must check out his other stuff.
- Leslie Jones: She recently starred as Patty in Ghostbusters, but y'all know she’s a writer on SNL? Yeah, and killing it every day. (also apparently she had a basketball scholarship lord help me)

these are mostly mainstream comedians that I adore, please add on some other ones if you know any!

Groundbreaking Female Comic Book Store Owner Now Appears on a Marvel Cover

Ariell Johnson has been collecting comic books for more than a decade, but she’ll soon add a very personal one to her collection.

The 33-year-old founder and president of Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse, Inc. in Philadelphia will appear on a variant cover of “Invincible Iron Man #1.”

The first image of the book, which goes on sale next month and features Johnson having a meal with new Marvel superhero RiRi Williams, is below.

Johnson said she owes the collaboration to her colleague Randy Green, whom she said spearheaded the project and conceptualized the cover.

“When the email went out about potential variants for stores, he was really excited and took it upon himself to work out the [details]. It was really his hard work,” she told ABC News. “I knew what it was supposed to look like, but having the actual art in front of you is so much different. It’s really exciting.”

Not that she hasn’t earned it. Johnson opened Amalgym last December, becoming the first black, female comic book store owner on the East Coast. However, her obsession of all things geek really began around age 10 or 11, when she discovered “X-Men” character Storm. Johnson credits the character, one of the first black, female superheroes, with being “the bridge that got me into this world.”

“To think I made it a decade-plus and I had never seen a black, woman superhero is crazy because little white boys have so many [with whom they identify]: ‘I want to be Iron Man!’ 'I want to be Batman!’ 'I want to be Superman.’ 'I want to be Han Solo!’ When you are a person of color, you’re scraping the bottom of the barrel to find someone you can identify with. I always felt like I was watching other people’s adventures,” she explained. “Being introduced to Storm was a pivotal moment for me because had I not come across her, I might have grown out of my love for [comics].”

After graduating from cartoons to comics in high school, Johnson began buying her own books in college. Her Friday routine was comforting: She’d go to the comic book store to get her weekly stash, and then take the books across the street to her favorite coffee shop, where she’d read them over a hot chocolate and piece of cake. When the coffee shop was forced to close some 10 years ago, Johnson decided it was up to her to create a space that gave her the same feeling of warmth.

“The goal is to be an inclusive geek space,” she said. “So it’s not just comics; it’s gaming, it’s sci-fi, it’s horror, whatever you geek about, we want to make room for you!”

She’s also proven to be a role model for girls and women. Johnson, who points to Marvel’s diverse cast of characters and story lines as proof that the industry is evolving in a positive way, said that she’s worked hard to make sure that everybody feels welcome at Amalgam.

“I had a girl tell me I had an excellent book selection and she was 7 or 8. I don’t know how welcome she might feel in some other spaces,” she said. “Women exist in this space! We’ve always been reading comic books, we just may not have been as open about it. I definitely get very positive feedback from not just little girls, but grown women too.”

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The Humanist Report: Bernie Sanders’ ‘Our Revolution’ is Drafting Nina Turner to Run for Governor in Ohio


Nina Turner replacing John Kasich in Ohio and becoming the first Black female governor in history would truly give me hope in 2018. We all support you Nina! PLEASE RUN!!!

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American University called police to protect its first black female student body president

  • American University spokesperson Teresa Flannery said law enforcement has been dispatched to protect Taylor Dumpson — the school’s first black female student government president — and her family after a racist incident on campus that targeted her and her sorority. Read more. (5/5/17, 6:15 PM)

Dr, Sarah Loguen Fraser by Susan Keeter

Sarah Marinda Loguen Fraser (29 January 1850-9 April 1933) was born to a former slave turned conductor of the Underground Railroad in 1855.  Sarah decided to become a physician after seeing a young boy pinned beneath a wagon, vowing “I will never never see a human being in need of aid again and not be able to help”  

She became the first American black women to earn a medical degree, the first American black female physician specializing in obstetrics and pediatrics in the United States, and the first female physician in the Dominican Republic. 

Sylvana Simons, the first ever black female party leader of a European political party.

“Racism, sexism and Islamophobia are widespread, not just in the Netherlands but in most parts of Western Europe. I was tolerated when I was an entertainer. But you can’t be black, female, politically involved and try to shape the society you live in without angering some people.

When I started speaking out one of the first comments was that I didn’t “know my place”. I’ve known my place my whole life! If you are not white, heterosexual and male, this country suggests you have to be treated differently.

When you’ve gained wealth through slavery and colonialism, you will build courts, police and judiciary based on that system. The problem is when you say such things out loud it sounds as if everyone is being racist on purpose all the time. That’s not true, but the way the society is shaped is racist and divisive.

We want to represent all of Dutch society and our list of candidates alone shows we are truly reflecting the Netherlands. We have equal numbers of men and women. We have gay, lesbian, and transgender candidates. We are normalising what is already normal in society.

We are a new and unconventional voice in society. We are emancipating people and politics.”

anonymous asked:

What do you think are the most important women architect in the history of architecture, and your fav?

OK, here is MY list. Everyone is free to agree or disagree or to comment on who was left out but I limited the list to 10 spots and focused on the last century.

You are invited to post about any of those that were not included and tag me, if I agree with your suggestion I will add a list of runner ups and link it to your post.

Lina Bo Bardi

Lina Bo Bardi, was an Italian-born Brazilian modernist architect. A prolific architect and designer, Lina Bo Bardi devoted her working life, most of it spent in Brazil, to promoting the social and cultural potential of architecture and design. Source Image

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Euzhan Palcy: Trailblazing black female filmmaker

After French West Indian filmmaker Euzhan Palcy’s debut film, Sugar Cane Alley, earned her France’s distinguished César Award for best first work in 1984, an impressed Robert Redford personally invited her to attend the 1985 Sundance Institute Filmmakers Lab (depicted in the above photos). There she workshopped her adaptation of the novel A Dry White Season, about South Africa’s then still-prevalent apartheid. A few years later MGM would produce the movie, making Palcy the first black female director to helm a major Hollywood studio title. Her dedication to an unrelentingly accurate portrayal of apartheid in the film drew Marlon Brando out of his self-imposed, years-long retirement to accept a role that earned him an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor, and made Palcy the first black director—male or female—to direct an Oscar-nominated performance.

Photos: © 1985 Roger Christiansen | Courtesy of the Sundance Institute Archives

So I got curious what this film ‘Hidden Figures’ was about, and on IMDB found references to the many outright lies contained within it, one of which pointed me to the Wikipedia entry, which goes into just how unfounded the historical inaccuracies being flogged in the movie actually are:

“The film, set at NASA in 1961, depicts segregated facilities such as the West Area Computing unit, an all-black group of female mathematicians, who were originally required to use separate dining and bathroom facilities. However, in reality, Dorothy Vaughan was promoted to supervisor of West Computing in 1949, becoming the first black supervisor at the NACA and one of the few female supervisors.

In 1958, when the NACA made the transition to NASA, segregated facilities, including the West Computing office, were abolished. Dorothy Vaughan and many of the former West Computers transferred to the new Analysis and Computation Division (ACD), a racially and gender-integrated group.

“Mary Jackson completed her engineering courses and earned a promotion to engineer in 1958, becoming NASA’s first black female engineer. Katherine Johnson was assigned to the Flight Research Division in 1953, a move that soon became permanent. When the Space Task Group was formed in 1958, engineers from the Flight Research Division formed the core of the Group and Katherine moved along with them. She coauthored a research report in 1960, the first time a woman in the Flight Research Division had received credit as an author of a research report.

“In an interview with WHRO-TV, Katherine Johnson played down the feeling of segregation. ‘I didn’t feel the segregation at NASA, because everybody there was doing research. You had a mission and you worked on it, and it was important to you to do your job…and play bridge at lunch. I didn’t feel any segregation.’“

These are all real people, living real lives, full of real, documented events: Why would you want to tell the story of women you presumably admire and then lie about them to this degree? Who benefits from doing so? How does telling a false narrative about the past honor the achievements of those women, or, for that matter, help anyone today?

Future filmmakers, I’ll help you out: it doesn’t at all. Not one little bit.

So far in discovery we have:

A black female first officer/protagonist
Asian female captain
Gay male scientist
Alien
Klingon black guy
Klingon white lady
Klingon british/pakistani guy

So let me elaborate the news: we’ve had 7 confirmed characters so far, most of them leads or supporting the lead, and none of them is a straight white human male