first time using textures in a gif

I’m not finished with this one yet but I thought I’d share my progress so far. This is my first time animating textures, as seen on Finchlett’s eyes to make him blink. Games often use this technique as it’s much easier (and less graphically taxing) than the alternative of modelling and rigging actual eyes. Plus it looks cuter most of the time, at least I think so.

It looks like we’re actually going to be able to make our game work on the 3DS!****(probably!*****)

Having signed up for Nintendo development I’m not allowed to share information about systems and specs, so I won’t go into detail, but there are some aspects of 3DS development I want to share with you all:

Textures VS polygons

When I started working on graphics for this, I used Spyro as reference, and by extension the limits of the PS1. The Playstation’s main problem was its inability to render many polygons at the same time, so everything had to be extremely lowpoly and a lot of fancy trickery had to be used to make it look like there was more geometry on the screen than there actually was. On the other hand, the Playstation used big discs and had quite a bit of video memory, which allowed it to have many fairly big texture maps (for the time). The Nintendo 64 could hardly fit any textures at all, but used mipmapping instead, to “smudge out” the images, so that two pixels would be enough to make a perfectly smooth gradient. The N64 approach meant that geometry had to be used very cleverly to imply detail, since detail couldn’t really be stored in texturemaps. A lot of very tiny pixel-constellations were also used to create repeating patterns.

Keep reading

The cognitive collection is here.

First it was the cognitive dress, now Australian designer Jason Grech leveraged insights from Watson to create the world’s first cognitive couture collection for Melbourne Spring Fashion Week. Jason ran ten years of fashion data and real-time social posts through the Watson Visual Recognition API to analyze and predict trends that helped him find new ways to work with fabrics, color and textures. Jason also used Watson to infuse the couture with his love of architecture by matching architectural images with fashion images and taking inspiration from the lines, curves and corners. Now that’s some fashion forward thinking.

Explore the cognitive collection →

3

The Thousand Chance Umbrella