first person stories

There is something I do not understand

When Freeform released a lot of Malec stuff before the episodes, people complained

Now that Freeform has released a lot less Malec stuff, people complain

I am having hard time understanding what people want

You thought I stopped talking to you because I got bored. However, you’ve got it all wrong. I’m in love with you so much. I love you and it’s killing me because you won’t ever feel the same way. You look at me but you do not see me. Not with stars in your eyes or with a sense of awe. Not with love. So I’m sorry it seemed like I disappeared. For a while I was selfish and wanted to still keep you in my life. It didn’t work out like that. I realized that it didn’t matter if I left or if I stayed, because it would all hurt the same.
—  C.H. // Learning to Say Goodbye

holmes interacts with irene for a grand total of… maybe an hour? he helps her marry her husband, and he rests in her sitting room for a few minutes

that’s it. that’s the entirety of their “relationship”

and yet somehow, here we are, with 126 years’ worth of he loves her he loves her he loves her!

i will literally never forget the watching the season four premiere of the office like we spent a whole summer agonizing over whether or not jim and pam were FINALLY dating and then in the beginning my brother actually threw a pillow at the tv when it looked like they weren’t together and then they kISSED and i swear to god my whole family started screaming and hugging like we woke up my three year old sister lmao and my friend called me during the commercial break so we could yell about it and then we stayed on the line so we could scream every time they did anything like when they held hands we hit decibels that weren’t audible to humans and to this day i have never seen my brother literally flail about something the way he did on that fateful night in 2007

5

Shiro canonically being six and a quarter years old is the best news I’ve heard this entire year.

“….“….?!” Staring upon the unknown room, the demon tried his best to recollected his memories; unfortunately..no luck. He peered around the poorly lit room to see that everything in there was a complete discord, it was covered with boxes in all sizes and shapes, scattered paper that read gibberish, and a mysterious black substance that painted the walls and ceiling. There were small black candles that surrounded each point of a painted star on the floor…. “

[[I wanted to redraw a scene from the fic-_-;; ]]

13 reasons why (Tape 1)

Characters: Dean, sister!reader, Mary, Sam, John

Warnings: mention of death, angst, swearing

Word count: 4139

Summary: Dean listens to the first tape that you left after you died. He learns about the rules he has to follow with them, and who the first cause of your decision was.

A/N: italics are flashbacks to the events before your death

Series: Part 1 Part 2

Dean woke up around 5am on Monday morning. It had been three months since you, his 18 year old sister, had decided to take your own life. Him and Sam never got a note, you were just gone and that was all they knew. They were too late to save you and that bothered him. Every morning since that day he woke up at 5am. He realised there was no going back to sleep so he climbed out of bed and headed to the door. When he opened the door he was surprised to be greeted with a small box in front of his feet. Dean looked left and right and noticed Sam wasn’t around to have just placed the box there. He sighed, picked it up, shut his door and walked back to his bed.

As he opened up the box he was confused as he noticed that all was inside were tapes. Why would someone give him a box of tapes? Dean rummaged through the box on his shelf and found his old tape player that John had given him when he was a kid and wanted to listen to AC/DC. He put the first mysterious tape inside the player and pressed play.

“Hello,” the familiar voice that he hadn’t heard for three months spoke which almost hurt his ears to know that he could hear in tape form. He must have been mistaken… It couldn’t be!

“My name is Y/N Winchester,” your tape continued. “I am making these tapes because I want to tell you why I ended my life. And if you’re listening to this…” The tape paused for a moment and Dean waited in suspense. “You’re one of the reasons why.”

Keep reading

I claim to miss the burn of alcohol as it slips down my throat.
I ache for the immediate high as I popped the pills like candy.
But it’s you I’m searching for in the bottom of the glass and the prescription bottle.
It’s you that I fucking need but that would make me heartbroken.
When I claim to not care.
—  M.C.E. A year today we were no more.
I think that it takes a lot of strength, selflessness, and courage to recognize that you are not the right one for another person. It takes a lot to let go, but at the end of the day, you just want them to be truly happy. So even though it’s hard, you’re the one to break it up.
Make You Scream - a Vikings Imagine

Pairing: Ivar x Reader
Rating: Explicit (really, I mean it. No fade to blacks here. Only follow the link if you’re over 18)
Warnings: dubious consent (social duress - lost a bet), cheating, threats
Words: 1415
Summary: The Reader loses a bet with Ivar and he comes to collect from you. Sexually.

Notes: This piece was inspired by @sansasandorshipper​’s imagine: “You are with Ubbe but Ivar is always trying to get with you.” Thank you so much darling, for letting me publish this homage to your brilliant idea. My story is an alternate ending to that tale, in mine the reader LOSES the fight and the bet.

As always for my smuts, the setting is an AU where the time jump in mid-season 4 lasted long enough to make Ivar older than the age of consent in your country ;)

Excerpt: Before you can fall asleep, the door scrapes open again. “Ubbe, remember how you mother scolded both of us when she caught you in here at night last time,” you call out.

“Not Ubbe,” comes a chuckling voice from near the floor.

Your heart starts racing as you watch Ivar pull himself up to your bedside. “Are you ready to settle up on that bet, y/n?”

“Go to Hel, Ivar,” you spit back, pulling your furs up to your chin. You are wearing nothing but a thin linen shift under there.

“Think of your honor,” he smirks, resting his elbows on the edge of your bed. “Do you really want to be known as someone that goes back on a wager?”

You grit your teeth. Your word and your honor mean everything to you. You narrow your eyes, bringing your face close to Ivar’s. “If you truly think you can make me scream your name, you are welcome to try,” you challenge. You hate Ivar. You hate his smirks, and his ridiculously blue eyes, and the way he always has to have the last word with—

His hand is under your furs, sliding up your thigh.

Finish reading on Ao3 here, this thing is waaaay too smutty to put in the respectable tags on Tumblr

anonymous asked:

Hello! So I was scouring the Internet for advice today but I couldn't find any on this topic. My problem isn't that I don't have any ideas (I probably have too many) but the problem is that I don't LOVE any of my ideas. I like them. I think they're all fine ideas. But liking them isn't going to motivate me long enough to finish a novel. How can I give my ideas that extra uumph to make me love them? How can I figure out what's missing or why I don't feel this way about any of my ideas?

Hello, nonny!  What a challenging question…  This one’s been in my inbox a couple days, just because it’s such a big question.  But I’ve thought it over and I think I have some ideas for you :)


The Thrill Is Gone – How to Find It Again

So generally, there’s no one answer or cure-all to this problem.  I’ve had this issue multiple times, with different causes.  My first novel didn’t have enough meat to the plot; my second novel had been over-planned in my head to the point that it no longer excited me.  My third novel had way too much plot, so that by the time I got ¾ the way through, I’d written over 200K words and felt sick of the idea.  I started my fourth novel way too soon, and am now going back and planning it more!  So there are obviously many different reasons that a story doesn’t take off (or dries up eventually).

The first step is to figure out what’s missing, like you said.  There are a few aspects of your story to assess…


1. Plot

I’m discussing plot first because, to me, it’s the most important part of fiction.  Plot, conflict, and stakes are foremost to my stories.  You could have the most complex and sympathetic characters, but without plot, they’re static and become boring.  But for some reason, this is the part of story ideas that new authors neglect most!

So if your story has great characters and an immersive setting, but you can’t get into it, try asking a few questions about your plot:

  • What is the point of the plot?  What’s the message you’re conveying in the story?  Even if your story isn’t an allegory or a metaphor or the next Chronicles of Narnia, there should always be a conclusion to which all plots arrive – otherwise, the story can feel aimless.  The best way to find your message is to look at the conflicts involved (e.g. Man vs. Man, Man vs. Nature, etc.) and find the “winner”.  What worldview, belief, or concept “defeats” the other concepts?  It can be as simple as Good vs. Evil, or more complex, like Loving the Sincere Drug Addict vs. Settling for the Selfish Dentist (provokes the question “Is love worth danger in relationships?”).
  • Does the plot have ups and downs?  And really consider both ends of the spectrum here.  Stories become dull if they are made up of victory after victory – or if they’re made up of nothing but loss and tragedy.  No matter the genre, you have to strike some sort of balance, lest the story become predictable and emotionally non-engaging.  Find victories and failures, even in unassuming places, to keep readers invested and hopeful.
  • Do you have a satisfactory ending?  Or do you have the ending     planned yet?  I’ve found that I can’t really commit to an idea unless I see a resolution – otherwise I feel too nervous to start.  If you do have an ending planned, make sure it’s the right ending.  It can feel like there’s one possible conclusion, and once you’ve found it, you stick to it – but question it, brainstorm it.  It may not be a happy ending every time, but when you find the right one, you’ll know it.
  • Do you have the right plot at all?  Look at your story as a whole.  Does it start too early or too late, relative to the real meat,     the real action?  Is it told from the most impactful POV?  Does the plot cover too much ground for one book, or is it not enough to fill the pages?  Consider all the characters, backstories, and subplots you have, and ask yourself if any of them are more interesting than the main plot.  If so, shift your focus.  Use them instead.

2. Characters

Maybe it’s not your plot that’s going sideways.  Maybe you have it all worked out – the head, the tail, the whole damn thing – but it still doesn’t feel right.  It doesn’t feel like it’s coming to life, somehow.  It feels flat.

That can be a character problem.  It would be like sitting by the campfire and hearing the most fascinating, horrifying story, except it’s told by a man with The Most Boring Voice Who Talks So Incredibly Slowly and Takes All the Fun Out of Everything.  An example: The Hunger Games.  Those books bored the crap out of me.  Unless someone was being killed or Haymitch and Effie were interacting, I just didn’t care.  And those books had a great plot behind them!

So here’s what you need for a good cast of characters:

  • A solid protagonist.  Solid = three-dimensional, empathetic, and relatable; having a goal, an internal conflict, a self-image, and fears or shame.  They should have different facets of themselves – their head and their heart, their desires and doubts, and that little voice in their head that says, “Give up on that.  Be realistic.”  Give them strengths, weaknesses, and a couple of bad habits, for kicks.
  • A variety of supporting characters.  You don’t have to have thirty characters + six secret characters stuffed under your trench coat; but with however many characters you have, make them as different from each other as possible.  Give them some similarities, of course, so that they can relate to each other – but never make them so close together that you have to decide, “Who should say this line?  Character A or Character B?”  Make them unique enough that the words come out of their mouths, instead of you having to decide where to put the words, yourself.
  • Relationships, relationships, relationships.  And I’m not talking about romantic relationships.  I mean, sure, those too – but there are many different kinds of relationships to explore.  Friendships, enemy-ships (?), parent relationships, sibling-ships, silent alliances, “annoying friend-of-a-friend”-ships, “my-ex’s-little-sister”-ships, “you’re-the-ruler-of-the-galaxy-and-a-Sith-lord-but-also-my-dad-please-stop-being-evil”-ships…  You get the idea.  Make them unique, make them strong, and allow them to evolve over the course of the story.
  • Diverse morals, interests, and personalities.  My first short stories focused on white middle-class people who were culturally and politically identical.  They lived in one house, usually, and watched the same TV shows and made the same references.  They had the same sense of humor.  They rarely disagreed on anything that wasn’t clear-cut (e.g. “You drank the last Pepsi!”  “I was thirsty!”).  So do yourself a favor and don’t make my mistakes.  Give your characters unique ethics, cultures, backgrounds, personalities, goals, appearances, and conflicts.  You’ll be more invested by then, I’m sure.

3. Setting

Lastly, I’d like to add that while your characters and plot could be well-developed, there’s always a chance that they’re placed in the wrong setting.  This is why many story ideas can seem great, but won’t get off the ground – maybe they’re set in a pre-made universe like Middle Earth or Panem when they could be their own story.  Maybe your tragic romance is set in the middle of apocalyptic war, when instead, it should be drained down to a period piece.  Maybe your story is perfect, except you’re writing it too close to home – in the real world, in the present year.  There are a million factors to picking the right setting, including:

  • Applicable history and culture.  If you’re writing a story about someone who’s oppressed, or someone who’s a politician, or someone who’s a witch, you’re going to need to back that up with history.  Develop a history for the oppression or politics or witchcraft – where these things began, how they developed over time – and a culture for them now – how oppressed people survive and how witches in your world interact, etc.
  • Imaginative scenery, influenced by the characters.  Even if your story takes place in New York City in 2017, allow your characters’ living spaces and workplaces to have a unique touch – colors and quirks that your readers can see in their mind.  If even you can’t see what you’re writing, inspiration is going to be difficult to find.
  • A lifelike background.  Just because the plot focuses on your characters does not mean everything going on behind it should be quiet and dead.  Anyone who looks out a window in a city building can see other people living – people on the highway will see other cars taking other people other places.  Everyone who has a friend will hear a little something about their friend’s siblings, their friend’s friends, their friend’s neighbors.  Life and stories exist outside of your plot; make sure you’re not writing about a ship in a bottle.
  • An aesthetic.  That sounds gross and teen-tumblr-y, but let me tell you personally: I don’t feel truly ready to write (and love) my story until I can hear the music for the future movie adaptation – until I can see the kind of clothes the people wear, the games they play, the places they eat and shop.  I think of the colors and themes in my scenes (e.g. my first novel was set primarily at night in a grunge/city setting; my current novel is very green and outdoorsy and gives me that feeling of bonfires just after sunset).  Once you get that “feeling” from your story, you’ll know it.

Anyway, this reply took me like three days to write because I really wanted to get into it.  I hope some of this helps you to fall in love with one of your ideas, so you can get started :)  If you have any more questions, be sure to send them in!

(I have 26 questions in the inbox, though, so be patient with me…)


If you need advice on writing, fanfiction, or NaNoWriMo, you should maybe ask me!

😂

So today this seven year-old girl comes out of the school washroom looking very pleased with herself. She skips up to me and, pointing to her braids, says, “Look! I fixed my hair so that this piece is *here* and this piece is *here*!” She heads back to class when all of a sudden she stops, gets wide-eyed, and says, “I FORGOT TO POOP” and runs back into the washroom.

The Crownless Prince of Tenebrae

Alright, so I finished FFXV and Ravus is my favourite character. Even if he only gets about 40 minutes of screen time. Therefore I wrote this thing. It’s a long-one. This is also my first time writing in the first-person perspective but I think it turned out ok.
This story contains mentions of murder, non-con/dub-con and other not so good things.
As always edited by @corrupted-spirit.
Enjoy the story.

Keep reading

@kakairu-fest has started posting! (Feb. 2017) So I had to draw some KakaIru.  

Here’s the AO3 page so you can see what’s posted so far!

I’m a participant, so I’m going to be trying to comment on as many of the stories as I read. The better the comment culture in a fest, the more likely people are to come back next year. :P

ALSO, I will draw (or write?) you some KakaIru if 

  • you are the first person to guess which story is mine :P or
  • you comment on five fics posted by the end of the fest 

No one ever takes me up on these offers, but that doesn’t stop me from making them. XD

Hide and Seek

Eek okay, first Avatar story, first story told with almost an entirely one person cast, first story that deals with some nasty child treatment that made me feel a bit ick writing it. But the thought came to me and it just exploded out over a few days. So here it is, please let me know what you think and how I can improve!

Warnings: Child torture/abuse, mild blood and gore, Zuko is very, very unhappy



“You will learn to firebend, Prince Zuko,” Ozai said with a smile. “Your life depends on it.”


Zuko knew today was going to be a good day.

It started with Father asking them if they would play a game with him. Father never spent time with them, never showed any desire to see them unless necessary. Azula saw him more than he did since Father was currently supervising her firebending training while they looked for another teacher. She’d run off the last one and the one before that. Zuko thinks she’s doing it on purpose, because she enjoys hurting people, because it makes their father proud, maybe both. Since Zuko wasn’t firebending yet, Father never wants to see him. It seems every time he does, Father spends all his time glaring at him, as if that would make him any less worthless. Seven was a little late for someone to start bending but it wasn’t impossible because he had to be a bender, Father and Grandfather said so.

Keep reading