first person account

hello i was really inspired by elsewhere university so i wrote what could be considered a first person account of a freshman? i hope you like it!!!

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You apply to college because you know you’re supposed to. You’re not sure if you’re ready for it, though. In the past, your grades have fluctuated because you have executive dysfunction and also you never learned how to study. Smart kid problems, your dad always said.

You only apply to one college. If you don’t get in, you’re going to take a year off from school. You don’t really know what you’ll do, but you’ll figure it out. You apply to one of the most prestigious schools in the world: Elsewhere University.

Elsewhere University is a lot like any other university, from what you understand. You did your research. There’s weird rules, and there’s a whole blog dedicated to the culture surrounding that particular school. There’s something in each post that makes you think that there’s something the authors aren’t saying, but you never get a response when you ask in the comments or by emailing. One woman replied, but all she said was, “Be careful, but it’s a good school. I highly recommend it.”

You tried to find pass/fail rates of the school, but you can’t find anything. Apparently nobody fails out of Elsewhere university, only drops out or disappears. In fact, there’s a strangely high amount of disappearances from Elsewhere University that nobody seems to be making a fuss about. You almost regret applying when you learn about that.

Your best friend’s sister’s girlfriend graduated from Elsewhere U, so you ask your best friend to put you in contact with her. She does. Her sister’s girlfriend gives you a load of advice, and also highly recommends the school. She tells you that it’s an actual fact that nobody fails out of Elsewhere University, but that lots drop out or vanish. She says “vanish” a little wistfully, and you remember that time about five years ago when she’d vanished for a week, but then showed back up weirdly wiser and cleverer. You don’t ask about it.

Her advice consists of weird superstitions that she swears by: keep a bit of iron tucked away, carry some salt with you, and to carry candy and sweets with you. She doesn’t explain why, but you pack an old horseshoe, a container of salt, and your entire stash of candy.

She also gives you a list of rules.  

  1. Don’t eat anything they give you.
  2. Be polite to them.
  3. Don’t break any promises to them.
  4. Be careful making deals with them.
  5. Don’t say “I’m sorry,” say “Pardon me.” Also, don’t say “Thank you,” say “I appreciate it”
  6. Be nice to plants and animals.
  7. Feed the crows.

You have no idea what any of that means, but you know that you will soon. You thank her for her advice. It’s an easy job to type up the list of rules she gave you and turn it into your new background. You have trouble with social stuff, so having a list of rules is a godsend.

Your grandpa takes you down to your school. You don’t really know where it is, but his GPS knows where to go apparently. You have no idea how long the ride is. It feels like forever, and you start to worry about your fish. The GPS says you’ll be there in an hour. The GPS said you’d be there in an hour, an hour ago. You hope your betta fish will be okay. He’s been in his travel container for what feels like too long.

When you arrive, there’s a group of volunteers helping people like you move in. A team of three grabs up all of your stuff. You carry your fish and your newly acquired keys. The volunteer who signs you in warns you to keep track of your keys, that They can beep into the dorms and will raid your room for shiny stuff. You ask what she means. She shakes her head and calls you a freshie. You don’t ask again.

The three who help you take your stuff to your room give you advice. The girl tells you to stay away from the library and the dining hall at 3am. The boy tells you not to make deals at the point where two crosswalks create a crossroads in front of the Briggs building.

The person of indeterminate gender asks you what your major is, and when you tell them you’re thinking about creative writing, they tell you to be extremely careful and to never accept food from strangers under any circumstances and to be careful in even the dining hall and that if you can’t be absolutely sure that whoever is giving you food is human and to politely reject it otherwise and also don’t let the Fair Folk critique your stories because they’ll consider that a favor and you don’t want to owe them a favor and-

The girl hisses at them to shut up, that they’re scaring you. She’s not wrong. You want to hear more, though, so the person of indeterminate gender who tells you to call them Jules. You have a feeling that Jules isn’t their birth name. You tell them to call you by the nickname your friend gave you. They grin at you and say you’re already learning.

The trio leaves you in your room, alone. Your roommate isn’t here yet. You take the side of the room with the comfy chair, but leave them the good wardrobe. You feel like that’s a fair trade. It doesn’t take you long to unpack, and by the time your roommate shows up, all you’re doing is putting up your last poster (a Captain America “propaganda” poster).

She gives your poster a disgusted look. You say hello. She says hello back. She doesn’t thank the volunteers when they leave. She sets up her side of the room quickly, and complains about her wardrobe being slightly tilted. You point out that yours doesn’t close all the way. She scoffs, but quits complaining.

You never really get to like your roommate. She’s out all the time, she joins a sorority, and when she is in the room, her boyfriend is with her. Having him in the room makes you itch. He’s a nice guy, but something about him makes you dislike him instantly.

You stay polite, but when she vanishes, you aren’t really concerned. She’s often gone for a night or two. It’s only on the third night that you think you should probably report that she’s gone.

You knock on the RA’s door before your first class. She’s half asleep and tells you she’ll look into it, but that if your roommate shows up on her own to tell her. Oh and, she adds, if she comes back weird, be careful, Freshie.

Your roommate never comes back. Your RA shows up at your door after two weeks with a teary-eyed middle aged couple to pack her stuff up. You leave for the library with a thin excuse. You try to avoid the library, but it’s a good place to go when it’s nine at night and nothing is open except the student union. You already ate tonight, and going to the student union always makes you hungry, even when you’ve just eaten. The library is safer on your wallet.

You linger for an hour and a half. Half of your homework is done, including that essay you were sure would take you days to finish. You think you might come to the library more often after this.

When you return to your dorm, you pass by your RA’s open door. She said to leave the half of the room that isn’t yours empty, that you’d be getting a new roommate soon. You agree easily. You hope this next roommate is nicer than the last one. One of your classmates, who only goes by Elly, says that her roommate was replaced by something that looked just like them, but acted wrong. A junior hushed her, but it was enough to leave you thankful that your roommate had just vanished.

The next morning, you give one of the campus crows a slice of ham from your sandwich. It bows its head in thanks. It flies away after that. You decide to keep feeding the crows. You’ve always been superstitious, and it’s always good to have crows on your side, right? Your best friend’s sister’s girlfriend even said to feed the crows. Even if it’s just mumbo-jumbo, it can’t hurt, right?

You feed the crows. You go to class. You eat dinner in the dining hall, and only take food that’s being served by the workers who are clearly human. You don’t look at the shadowy figures when you go to your night class. You don’t speak to the cloaked figures you see at all times of the day, but you nod politely in passing. You never say thank you, or I’m sorry. You follow the rules, and when time comes that someone who doesn’t look quite right stops you at the crossed sidewalk in front of the O’Brien building, you carefully only offer a handful of candy in exchange for the study guide the stranger offers you. They happily accept the candy, and you happily go over your new guide.

You like Elsewhere University. Your classes are going great, you have a few friends, and you’re starting to understand what’s going on around campus.

You feel like you’re going to do just fine here.

endless list of favourite books | 4 /♕: Victoria Rebels by Caroline Meyer

Queen Victoria’s personal journals inform this “intimate and authentic portrait” (Booklist) of one of history’s most prominent female leaders.

Queen Victoria most certainly left a legacy—under her rule as the longest reigning female monarch in history. But what was she really like? To be a young woman in a time when few other females held positions of power was to lead in a remarkable age—and because Queen Victoria kept personal journals, this historical novel from award-winning author Carolyn Meyer is an “absorbing, fictionalized first-person account” (Kirkus Reviews) that shares authentic emotional insight along with accurate information, weaving a fascinating story of intrigue and romance.

Ist Impact In Japan Interview- Mark talks about Jackson :3

Writing Research - World War Two

World War II (WWII or WW2), also known as the Second World War, was a global war. It is generally considered to have lasted from 1939 to 1945, although some conflicts in Asia that are commonly viewed as becoming part of the world war had begun earlier than 1939. It involved the vast majority of the world’s nations —including all of the great powers —eventually forming two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis.

It was the most widespread war in history, with more than 100 million people, from more than 30 different countries. In a state of “total war”, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, erasing the distinction between civilian and military resources. Marked by mass deaths of civilians, including the Holocaust and the first use of nuclear weapons in combat, it resulted in an estimated 50 million to 85 million fatalities. These made World War II the deadliest conflict in human history. [1]

Names

  • Social Security - Top Names of the 1940s
  • British Baby Names - Top 100 Names in England and Wales in 1944
  • Essential Baby - Top 100 Australian Baby Names in 1940
  • Baby Med - Top German Baby Names in 1940s
  • About.com - Japanese Baby Names for 1915 - 2000
  • Popular Japanese Names in 1945 - 1949 (In Japanese - Use Google Translator)

Society & Life

  • Wikipedia - Conscription in the United States: World War II
  • History.com - United States Imposes the Draft
  • The National WWII Museum - The Draft and WWII
  • Swarthmore College - Military Classifications For Draftees
  • The Art of Manliness - World War II Fitness Test
  • World War Two Gyrene - Recruit Training in World War II
  • The New York Times - The Old Army, It Turns Out, Was the Fitter One
  • National Park Service - The War Relocation Camp of World War II
  • History.com - The U.S. Home Front During World War II
  • History Learning Site - Britain’s Home Front in World War Two
  • Wikipedia - Japan’s Home Front During World War II 
  • Wikipedia - Germany’s Home Front During World War II
  • Canadian War Museum - Life on the Homefront
  • Canadian War Museum - Women and the War on the Home Front
  • Reddit: Ask Historians - How was it that Sweden managed to stay neutral during WW2?
  • Reddit: Ask Historians - What was going on in Ireland during World War II?
  • Canadian War Museum - Canada and the Second World War
  • Mount Allison University - Canada’s Role in WWII
  • Wessels Living history Farm - The Home Front in Rural America During World War II
  • Living Family History - Living in the 1940s (Australia)
  • BBC - WW2 People’s War: My Memories of My Childhood in South London
  • BBC - WW2 People’s War: Growing Up in London 1939-45
  • Time Witness - Memories Project: Stories from the 1940’s
  • BBC - The Blitz
  • History.com - Worst air raid on London
  • EyeWitness to History - The London Blitz, 1940
  • LIFE Magazine - World War II: London in Color (Photos)
  • Local Histories - Life in Britain in The Second World War
  • Telegraph - WW2: Former Evacuees Look Back
  • British Council - A 1940s Childhood in Wartime
  • The Wartime Memories Project - Evacuees
  • My Learning - Children’s Experience during WWII
  • Imperial Wartime Museum - Children During the Second World War
  • Reddit: Ask Historians - It’s 1940, a lovely day in England and I want to write to my German cousin. Was that possible? What was international communication between the civilian populace of warring WWII powers like?
  • The New Yorker - The New Yorker in the Forties
  • The Atlantic - World War II: The Battle of Britain
  • The Guardian - Children of the Wartime Evacuation
  • NY Daily News - 1940 New York census records are now searchable by name
  • New York Historical Society - WWII & NYC
  • About.com - World War II In Brooklyn: Places to Visit
  • New York Historical Society - New York during WWII (Photos)
  • Wikipedia - History of New York City, 1946-77
  • Business Insider - Take A Tour Of Manhattan In The 1940s (Photos)
  • Madison Magazine - Ida’s Wyman’s Photography Documents Life in the 1940s and ‘50s
  • Growing up in Inwood, New York City in the 1940’s and 1950’s
  • Reminisce Magazine - Brooklyn Stoop Served as Sisters’ Stage
  • NY Times - Working-Class New York Life and Labor Since World War II
  • Wessels Living History Farm - Rural Life in the 1940s
  • Historic Color Photos of U.S. Life in the 1940s (Photos)
  • Wessels Living History Farm - WWII Causes a Revolution in Farming
  • Partners in Winning the War: American Women in World War II
  • World War II: Women and the War
  • Building Bombs & Planes
  • Women in World War Two
  • Wikipedia - Canadian Women in the Second World War
  • Canadian War Museum - The Canadian Women’s Army Corps, 1941 - 1946
  • About.com - Canadian Women in World War II
  • Veterans Affairs Canada - The Second World War: Canadian War Brides
  • Global News - Looking back at the role women from western Canada played in World War II
  • Canadian Red Cross - History of Women in the Red Cross
  • Women Under Fire in World War Two
  • How did women fulfill their romantic/sexual needs during WWI/II?
  • Women at War
  • Life During World War II
  • Everyday Life During World War II
  • World War 2 - Growing Up in Wartime
  • Wartime Homes
  • World War 2 - Blackout Time
  • What was it like for children?
  • The Huffington Post - Memories Of 1940s Childhood
  • The Life of a Teenage Before and After World War II (PDF)
  • School and War Work
  • I’m a 13-15 year old in 1939 USA. What is youth culture like during this time?
  • A Black Nurse, a German Soldier and an Unlikely WWII Romance
  • What was it like to be in the Forces?
  • World War II - A Soldier’s Daily Life
  • My Army Service in World War II
  • WWII: A Soldier’s View
  • Loose Lips Sink Ships
  • Eye Witness To World War Two
  • World War II First Person Accounts, Letters Home, Diaries, & Journals
  • Pictures of African Americans During World War II (Photos)
  • Daily Life of the Average African American in the 1940’s
  • Veterans Affairs Canada - Second World War: Black Canadians In Uniform
  • The Memory Project - Black Canadian Veterans of the Second World War
  • University of Washington - Japanese Canadians During World War II
  • Vancouver Public Library - Chinese-Canadians in World War II (1939-1945)
  • Canada at War - Video & Footage: World War II
  • Canadian War Museum - Canadian Newspapers and the Second World War
  • Veterans Affairs Canada - Second World War: Diaries, Letters, And Stories
  • Library and Archives Canada - Canada and the First World War: War Diaries
  • Veterans Affairs Canada - Second World War: My Grandmother’s Wartime Diary
  • The Canadian Letters and Images Project - WWII
  • McGill University Library Digital Collections - Canadian War Posters Collection
  • World War II Military (Photos)
  • World War II Records
  • World War 2: A Day in the Life of a German Soldier
  • The Life During World War II
  • Nazi Germany
  • The Role of Women in Nazi Germany
  • Diary of Second World War German Teenager
  • Germany During World War II: A Child’s Experience (PDF)
  • Reminiscences of a German World War II Veteran
  • What kind of physical training would a German soldier in WWII have to do?
  • Jewish Life in Europe Before the Holocaust
  • The National WWII Museum - WWII and Holocaust Bibliography
  • Blacks During the Holocaust
  • Conditions for Polish Jews During WWII
  • Understanding the Treatment of Jews during World War II
  • There’s a lot of close-to-combat photographs from WWII, but I don’t often hear much about the photographers. Were WWII war photographers armed? Were they subject to neutrality/immunity/respect? Were they deployed with soldiers as part of the army?
  • World War II Weapons
  • List of World War II Weapons
  • Canada at War - WWII: Weapons & Arms
  • Small Arms Pt. II - The World War Two Era
  • Technology During World War II
  • WWII Military Ranks
  • WWII Japanese Soldier Diary
  • World War II Japanese Military Training
  • Canadian War Museum - The Second World War: Information, Propaganda, Censorship and the Newspapers
  • When was the last shot of World War 2 fired?
  • Post-War American Life: Culture of the late 1940s & 1950s
  • Library of Congress - Postwar United States, 1945 - 1968
  • American History: Life in the US After World War Two
  • Student Pulse - America in the Post War Period
  • PBS - Women and Work After World War II
  • PBS - New York After WWII
  • BBC - Life in Britain after WW2 (Video)
  • The Atlantic - World War II: After the War
  • Digital History - Overview of the Post-War Era
  • Mount Holyoke College - Background of Post-WWII German History
  • Youtube - Germany After WW2 | A Defeated People | Documentary on Germany in the Immediate Aftermath of WW2 (Video)
  • Der Spiegel Magazine - Out of the Ashes: A New Look at German’s Postwar Reconstruction

Commerce

  • The Cost of Living in 1940
  • Prices and Wages in 1930 - 1939
  • The People History - Food, Groceries and Toiletries in the 1930s: Prices
  • The People History - Clothes in the 1930s: Prices
  • Library at University of Missouri - 1940-1949 Prices and Wages
  • The People History - Food, Groceries and Toiletries in the 1940s Prices
  • The People History - Clothes in the 1940s Prices
  • Datafiles of Historical Prices and Wages
  • Curbed NY - What Would $50 In 1940 Rent A New Yorker Today?

Entertainment & Food

  • What did people eat in the Second World War?
  • Why was food rationed?
  • Rationing
  • World Ward II - Food and Shopping
  • Food on the Front Home
  • Wartime Recipes
  • What Did Children Eat During World War 2? (PDF)
  • World War Two Recipes
  • History Cookbook - World War 2 Recipes
  • The 1940’s Experiment: 100+ Wartime Recipes
  • Retro-Housewife: In the 1940s Kitchen: 1940s Recipes
  • A 1940s Menu: Food in the 1940s
  • Food Timeline: 1936 to 1940
  • Vintage Food Advertisement of the 1940s
  • World War II: Rest and Relaxation (Photos)
  • Chocolate! The Wars Secret Weapon - America in WWII Magazine
  • Chocolate - Energizing Soldiers 
  • U.S. Coffee Rationing
  • The American Scholar: Rum and Coca-Cola
  • Wartime Canada - Food on the Home Front during the Second World War
  • Alberta Online Encyclopedia - World War II: Homefront in Alberta: Rationing
  • Wartime Canada - Recipe Ideas from BC Electric
  • Pop Culture Goes to War in the 1940s
  • WWII Guide: Wartime Hollywood
  • Rationing and Scrap Drives in Rural America
  • Baseball and World War II
  • Baseball Goes To War: The National Pastime in World War II
  • Entertainment in Britain During WWII 
  • Entertainment Industry During World War II
  • World War II on the Radio
  • Wartime Entertainment WWII
  • Wartime Entertainment
  • Canadian War Museum - Art and War: Australia, Britain and Canada in the Second World War
  • The Forties and the Music of World War II
  • World War II Songs
  • Music 1940 - 1949
  • List of Billboard Number-One Singles of the 1940s
  • American Music During World War II
  • Role of Music in World War II
  • Entertainment in 1940 - 1949
  • Food Rations in the Japanese Forces
  • Makeshift Cooking, German Army, WW2
  • Radio in Nazi Germany
  • Newspapers in Nazi Germany
  • Films in Nazi Germany
  • Art in Nazi Germany

Hygiene, Health & Medicine

  • Medicine and World War II
  • Social Security - Life Expectancy from 1930s+
  • WWII Disease Table
  • History of WWII Medicine
  • The Use of Atabrine to Fight Malaria During World War II
  • The Use of Plasma During World War II
  • The Use of Morphine as a Pain Killer During World War II
  • Nursing and Medicine During World War II
  • The Army Nurse Corps in World War II
  • Equipment of a WWII Combat Medic
  • Personal Accounts of WWII Medics
  • WWII African American Combat Medics
  • Penicillin: Medicine’s Wartime Wonder Drug
  • Medicine in Germany, 1918 - 1945
  • World War II Exposures 
  • Controlling Disease during World War II, 1939 - 1944
  • Health on the Home Front - Health Care and World War II
  • WAR & Military Mental Health
  • Mentally Ill and Jewish in World War II
  • U.S. Veterans Affairs Lobotomized Soldiers After World War II
  • Lobotomy For World War II Veterans: Psychiatric Care by U.S. Government

Fashion

  • 1930-45 in Fashion
  • Clothing, 1930-45
  • Rationing Fashion in the United States
  • Fashion in the 1940s
  • 1940s Make-Up Guide
  • 1940’s Beauty Secrets
  • 1940s Fashion: The Decade Captured in 40 Incredible Pictures (Photos)
  • 1940s Rationing - Utility Clothing Fashion and Costume History
  • Women’s Clothing in 1940s
  • Fashion in 1940 - 1949
  • Fashion in the 1940s: Clothing Styles, Trends, Pictures & History
  • Fashion in the 1940s - Prices & Examples
  • What did they wear? Gas masks for all
  • What is Utility Wear?
  • The Front Line of British WWII Fashion
  • World War II and Fashion: The Birth of the New Look (PDF)
  • The impact of World War II on women’s fashion in the United States and Britain (PDF)
  • The History of Fashion WWI to WWII
  • Women’s Shoes in 1940s
  • Authentic WWII Era Hairstyle & How To
  • United States Army Uniforms in World War II
  • World War II German Uniform
  • List of World War II Uniforms and Clothing
  • Nazi Style
  • LIFE.com - Fashion in Post-War Paris

Dialogue

  • WWII US Naval Dictionary
  • Glossary of German Military Terms
  • Military Slang: Terms Used By Soldiers in WWII
  • FUBAR F***ed Up Beyond All Recognition: Soldier Slang of World War II (General Military)
  • Military Slang For WWII
  • List of Ethnic Slurs by Ethnicity
  • The Racial Slur Database - Germans
  • Morse Code
  • Military Time Chart for 24 Hour Time Clock
  • Converting Standard Time to Military Time
  • WW2 Civilian Slang
  • Teen Slang of the 1940s
  • 1940s Slang
  • Forties Slang
  • Words That Were: 1940–1949 (Canada)

Law Enforcement & Crimes

  • New Jersey State Police - History: 1940’s
  • New York State Police - History: 1940’s
  • Anaheim Police Department - History: 1940
  • Academia.edu - British Police Training in the 1940s and 1950s
  • Art Theft and Looting During World War II
  • Rape During the Occupation of Germany
  • War Rape in World War II
  • Allied War Crimes During World War II
  • Nazi Medical Experiments
  • World War II Crimes
  • Nazi War Crimes
  • German War Crimes Against Soviet Civilians
  • Nazi Crimes Against Soviet POWs
  • Execution of Women by the Nazi during World War II
  • World War II and the Holocaust
  • World War Two - German Prisoner of War Camps
  • List of WWII POW (Prisoner of War) Camps in Germany
  • German Prisoners of War in the United States
  • Japanese Prisoners of War in WWII
  • Sexual Slavery - Germany During WWII
  • German Military Brothels in World War II
  • Rape, Murder and Genocide: Nazi War Crimes as Described by German Soldiers
  • 1940s Crimes
  • History of Drug Abuse: The 40’s
  • 25 Vintage Police Record Photographs (Photos)
  • Grisly Crime Scene Photography of 1940s New York

anonymous asked:

Hi! One of your recent answered questions came up when I searched the term 'PayPal'. I'm looking into making a PayPal for sugaring, but I'm not sure if it requires any credit info or your address-- how risky is it to use a fake name? I don't want anything mailed to me w/ the fake name on it, because I live with other people

There’s actually a very specific way to safely use paypal for sugaring. You can first make a personal account with your real name attached to your bank account. Then, make a second account with your sugar name, not linked to an account. Your SD sends money to the sugar account, and you transfer it from there to your real one and on to your bank. That keeps your information safe, and allows you to get money.

anonymous asked:

Hello there! How would an autistic person with high sensitivity to sounds react when exposed to an fantistical amount of a disturbing sound (ex. a scream from a being in the sky that can be heard across an entire continent that caused glass to shatter and deafen people near it) provided he was safe enough from the physical effects of hearing it?

To be honest, a neurotypical person is also going to have an extreme reaction to this kind of sensory overload. What makes autistic people's​ sensory needs unusual is that our our thresholds for “acceptable” sensory input tend to be significantly different from neurotypical people’s. The ability to be over- or under-stimulated is not unique to autistic people, it is just that a neurotypical person is much less likely to experience it in their day-to-day life.

This is nicely explained in this post from autisticality.com, which has got some graphs which make the point very clearly.

Everyone – autistic and otherwise – has a comfortable range of input for each sense. For example, you have a comfortable range of temperature – if you’re much hotter or colder than your comfortable range, then you’ll be unhappy. Similarly, you have a comfortable range of volume – if it’s too loud you might get a headache or feel stressed, if it’s too quiet you might be unsettled or anxious.

External image

[image description: an informal graph comparing the comfortable levels of input for 3 neurotypical people - they are all almost the same]

Most NT [neurotypical] people have a pretty similar range of comfortable input. The point at which a sensation is “too much” or “too little” is mostly the same from one NT person to another. And there’s generally a pretty good correlation from one sense to another, too.

External image

[image description: an informal graph comparing the comfortable levels of input for 3 autistic people - they are all completely different from each other]

In comparison, autistic people tend to have much more varying levels of comfortable input. That means their comfortable range might be a) much narrower or wider than the NT average, and/or b) offset higher or lower than the NT average. Not only that, but the comfortable range in one sense may be offset  or expanded in one way, and the range in a different sense might be offset completely differently. All in all, autistic sensory experiences are a classic example of how we tend to occupy the extremes of any bell curve you care to mention.

The kind of noise level that you’re describing - shattering glass and loud enough to be heard across an entire continent - is very solidly in the “too much” range for neurotypical people as well as for autistic people.

Now, what would the reaction look like? The immediate reaction is likely to be the same, regardless of whether the character is neurotypical or autistic:
Clasping their hands over their ears, screwing their eyes shut, hunching their shoulders defensively, moaning in pain.

Longer term, your character is likely to experience sensory overload. I do not know how long the noise goes on for. It might be that the autistic character reacts to the sound as if it had been going on for much longer - a neurotypical character might react in pain to the noise, but not experience other ongoing symptoms of sensory overload if the duration is only short. Alternatively, a neurotypical character might experience sensory overload to a lesser degree - they might have trouble thinking and feel distressed and irritable, but without actually reaching the point of shutdown or meltdown. An autistic person will not necessarily have a shutdown or meltdown, but it is probably useful to read our masterposts about them so that you can have a better understanding of what’s involved.

You might also find it worth looking at our ‘personal accounts’ tag to read some first-person accounts of what shutdowns, meltdowns, and sensory overload feel like.

An autistic character is likely to take longer to recover following exposure to the noise anyway, and this is likely to be compounded by other characters’ reactions after the noise has stopped. Even once the noise itself has stopped, I imagine that other characters may react by crying or panicking, but these just mean that the character is exposed to even more noise, as well as an unusual social situation (Jude has to remind themself that it is not socially acceptable to yell “SHUT UP!!” at a guy who is distressed, even though his crying is piercing into their brain, which is still ringing from the scream).

Depending on what suits your narrative, you can help your character to recover more quickly by giving them a low sensory input environment to retreat to (low input from other senses as well, not just auditory) and possibly giving them the opportunity to use something like a weighted vest - many autistic people find that deep pressure helps calm emotional and sensory overload. Alternatively, if you want to be mean to your character, you can put them in a busy environment, surrounded by lots of people and with loads of information to process.

There is also the possibility of your character having a delayed reaction to the sensory overload, where your character is still affected by the sensory input but is able to function reasonably well for a while before it becomes too much.

-Mod Snail

ALARIC SALTZMAN SENTENCE STARTERS
  • Look ____, I know… er… things between you and I have been a little start and stop and I’m sorry for that, but maybe once I can… 
  • I don’t think she’s pretending.
  • I am every parent’s worst nightmare. I’m the chaperone teacher from hell.
  • She loved you too much and it was killing her.
  • You know that your old teacher had a jackass file? No joke. It’s, uh, typed on a label. It has all the troublemakers in it. But really, it’s just an opus to you.
  • Well… I’m naked. So I’m gonna go.
  • Who knows? Maybe his alter-ego is a pot-smoking hippie pacifist.
  • Ok give me your glass. Neither one of us is drunk enough for this conversation.
  • It’s, uh, more fun with a buzz. 
  • I mean, did you learn nothing from the moonstone in the soap dish?
  • Why not? I have nothing left to fight for. 
  • You look like a full-grown, alpha male douchebag. 
  • First person account of the Civil War? That`s like porn for a history teacher.
  • Well, mine was not making sure you were permanently dead.
  • Can I get you a drink? I hear the punch is real boss.
  • I don`t wanna spend my life searching for answers I really don`t want
  • It`s not like I`m a freak. I`m just being nice to someone new in town.
  • Yeah, ____’s one scary dude. But with nice hair. 
  • I’m your friend, dammit. And you don’t have any friends. So, no more lying.
  • I want to be honest with her, but until then ___ and I are over. 
  • You can be upset and hate me. I get it. Just know that I love you. At least I can tell you that much. 
  • First night you and I spent together, ___ walked in right when I was about …
  • I’m sorry, you’ve reached somebody who’s currently not operating.
  • Sleeping in you dead parents` room or my dead girlfriend`s room. No
  • I`m not a role model you know. I drink too much, I say the wrong things, I encourage bad behavior. 
  • I think you found a way to get out of bed this morning. And that makes you the strongest person I know.
  • This may come as a shock, but I am not here to hang out with you.
  • You don’t even approach the threshold of the crazy I’ve seen.
  • You changed my life, you know that? You completely turned it around. And for that, i will always love you even though I know you don’t love me the same way.
  • I love you, and I want to marry you and be your loving, honest, committed partner. And I want our little family to work. But I don’t want it if you’d rather be with someone else.
  • It’s a diaper, not a bomb. Though I could dismantle a bomb blindfolded if I needed to.
  • You actually think I’d watch this sober?
  • You know, I don’t know how I went so long without saying this, but you’re a real dick!
  • Cryptic question, accusatory tone, this doesn’t bode well for me.
  • Ehh, she did sleep with you.
  • Friendly advice, when you finally get the girl… don’t blow her up.
  • This is my bar, pal. No one’s gonna blow it up
  • You’re on speaker phone, dick. 
The Highgate Vampire Returns

Who is the Highgate Vampire?

One night in 1963, a couple were walking home down Swain’s Lane, which passed along cemetery’s north gate. What they encountered was so terrible they were frozen to the spot, transfixed with fear. They had come face to face with the vampire - a tall, dark figure, floating behind the railings. More sightings would follow: a man walking his dog saw the same tall dark figure sliding over the wall along Swain’s Lane like ‘black treacle’.

David Farrant, who runs the British Psychic and Occult Society, said he saw the vampire in 1969. The Highgate Vampire then became a media sensation that ran through the 70s. 

He said: “My first reaction was like it was so real that I actually thought it was someone dressed up or messing about because all these stories about vampires were in the news. It was by some branches but as soon as I turned up I was aware of something standing there and it was exuding a feeling not of evil, but menace. It all happened so quickly. The whole thing lasted for four to five seconds and felt like whatever it was filled me with energy, it is difficult to explain, and suddenly it just vanished.”

The Hampstead and Highgate Express reported on 27 February 1970 as saying that Seán Manchester believed that ’a King Vampire of the Undead’, a medieval nobleman who had practised black magic in medieval Wallachia (Romania), had been brought to England in a coffin in the early eighteenth century, by followers who bought a house for him in the West End. He was buried on the site that later became Highgate Cemetery, and Manchester claimed that modern Satanists had roused him. 

On 6 March, the same paper reported David Farrant as saying he had seen dead foxes in the cemetery, “and the odd thing was there was no outward sign of how they died.” When told of this, Manchester said it seemed to complement his theory. In later writings, both men reported seeing other dead foxes with throat wounds and drained of blood

In 1971 however, a more sinister story was circulated involved a young girl who was attacked in the cemetery by a tall, pale-faced creature. She was thrown down onto the ground but the vampire was luckily spooked by a car passing-by. 

A charred and headless body of a woman was found nearby, which the police suspected to have been the product of a black magic ritual. 

Was it staked?

There had been claims that the vampire was staked by Manchester:

“With a mighty blow I drove the stake through the creature’s heart, then shielded by ears as a terrible roar emitted from the bowels of hell. This died away as suddenly as it erupted and all became still. We witnessed the bodyshell cave in and quietly turn filthy brown which soon became a sluggish flow of inhuman slime and viscera in the bottom of the casket.” (Occult London)

Although beforehand Manchester at his first attempt could not stake the vampire due to pity and instead placed a wreath of garlic upon its coffin and sprinkled holy water.

However there is no complete evidence other than first person accounts that this event has truly taken place.

Has it returned?

This year, Declan Walsh recalled seeing the vampire walk through a locked gate in 1991 on his walk to work. The vampire was described to appear like a “Victorian nobleman” in appearance, dressed with a top hat

“He was extremely tall, well over six feet in height and he was very thin. He wore a long black cape-like coat and a top hat. His dress looked Victorian in style and he appeared all black. He also appeared to glide and there was no sound. The ground was littered with leaves yet I heard no sound from him nor did he take any notice of me.”

He said although many people expect ghosts to be transparent, the spirit was in fact black and solid, as well as having two piercing bright white eyes

Another witness watched the figure float from Swain’s Lane, from the east side to the west side of the cemetery, in August 2005.

And in 2012 it appeared the vampire was captured on camera. James Dobbin took a photo as he toured the historic Grade I-listed cemetery, which dates back to 1839.

A witness, who wished to remain anonymous, claims the male spirit was dressed in a three-quarter length coat and a top hat. The figure even whispered “Good evening to you sir” to the terrified onlooker, despite him standing more than eight feet away.

There are sightings and reports of the vampire that still continue to this day.

3.5/5 Stars.

Deputy Sheriff Lou Ford is a well-liked sheriff’s deputy in a small Texas town—but Lou has just one tiny secret: he has a sickness inside him…he likes to kill people.

But Lou’s time may soon be up, as his past deeds begin to catch up with him and his good-old-boy facade slips away.

The Killer Inside Me is a first-person account of a depraved sociopath. This is another one of those books that has lost some of its shock factor over the years (it was written in the 50s), yet it remains pretty disturbing and entertaining.

I have to admit I felt confused at times by some of the plot developments and had a hard time keeping track of characters due to lack of depth and development, but really the plot wasn’t the point, and I wasn’t there for the other characters, so it didn’t bother me too much.

Lou’s internal monologue is genuinely interesting and amusing in a disturbed and darkly comic way. It’s a trip to be in his mind for 220 pages.

5,000 followers! Unglaublich!

Thank you all for helping grow this blog well beyond my expectations. To celebrate this milestone, here are some books that I’ve read recently that I’ve enjoyed about the Eastern front and the closing days of World War Two. 

IVAN’S WAR

by Catherine Merridale

First up is one of the best books I’ve read about the Red Army. It’s a fantastic display of the absolute disarray of the Soviet Unions forces after the initial shock of Unternehmen Barbarossa, and their gradual regrouping and push back to Germany itself.

The book also lives up its name and provides many first-person accounts of war and pre-war life in the Red Army from regular grunts to high ranking officers. Overall, a very good read. 

Blood Red Snow

by Gunter K. Koschorrek

A powerful memoir of the Eastern front from the view of a common Landser. Koschorrek captured the utter horror of mass-scale warfare incredibly well.

“The sky is glowing over Stalingrad. Greyish-white smoke billows from the ground; flames shoot high into the sky in between. The long probing fingers of the searchlights tear at the half-darkness of the breaking day. There must be a lot of aircraft up. Bombs are ceaselessly raining down on a city that has been condemned to death. The explosions merge into one another, creating a devastating inferno.” 

The Last Year of the German Army May 1944-May 1945

by James Lucas

Breaking away from personal accounts of the war, this book was aimed to capture key engagements, orders of battle, war industry production (under heavy bombardment, mind you), and even the Wunderwaffe all in the last year of the war. 

Swansong 1945

By Walter Kempowski

One of the more interesting books I have read. Instead of the standard narrative most of these books have followed, this one instead chooses to jump between a few dozen view points and stories for a given day up until the end of the war. As a result you get interesting, humorous snippets such as

Mary Wigman in Leipzig: “The bombed out [German] women in the basement were boozing with Frenchmen and US soldiers….I have never encountered lechery so naked, so shameless….” (p. 37).

and in the next have something as horrifying as

American Francis Sampson at Neubrandenburg: When visiting a Russian unit, “A few metres from or camp, in the forest, we saw a sight that I will never forget…. Several German girls had been raped and killed here. And some had been hung by their feet and their bodies slit open….” (p. 248). 

Overall a good read, if a little hard to follow at times. 

The End: The Defiance and Destruction of Hitler’s Germany, 1944-1945

by Ian Kershaw 

With the Wehrmacht shattered in the West and routed in the East, many Germans still held on to the hope of victory even after disastrous losses. 

The author theorizes and discusses at length as to why the German population continued to support the regime even as it was crumbling down around them

This books tends to get into more of the “Why” as opposed to the “How” that “The Last year of the German Army” presented.


Again, thank you all! Despite my fairly busy schedule, I look forwarding to sharing more highlights of the Eastern front with you all. 

The whole Woody Collective thing reminds me of that one nosleep story where there’s a vigilante in the neighbourhood who starts by killing unpunished rapists/pedophiles etc, but by the end they’re killing teenagers who smoked weed one time

So ya idk if i ever told you guys this story, but

My love of languages started out as a love of learning. Other people have so much to teach me, but language is a huge barrier. I wanted to smash that barrier so that nothing would stand in the way of me learning from as many people as possible. And I can’t very well expect somebody else to learn MY language in order to do ME a service. If I want the payout, I gotta put the work in. So that’s why I started learning new languages.

Then in college I had a professor who spoke 7 languages. He wasn’t even a language professor, he was a history professor. But the reason he knew so much about history is from first person accounts from people around the world. Like me, he had realized that he couldn’t listen to these peoples’ stories unless he could understand them first. So he traveled the world, first learning the languages then learning the stories.

When I told him that my goal was to learn from people around the world, he issued a challenge to me: he told me to come back and visit him later on in life and have a conversation with him in every one of his known languages, to prove that I was serious. I’m going to do him one better. I plan to go back, have that multilingual conversation with him, and then end it by speaking a language that even he does not know.

And so I must learn 8 languages.

I adapted a long forgotten travelogue from 1861 “Artemus Ward Among The Mormons” for Blammo #10. I considered that a historic first person account of Salt Lake City during the 19th century would probably only be interesting to myself, but as I read the book it just felt so right for me. Artemus Ward, was considered America’s first stand up comedian, traveling all over doing humorous lectures and writing popular essays. He was the editor of Vanity Fair for a bit and published Mark Twain’s first short story. He died at 33 (the age I’m about to turn) He’s now sadly lost in obscurity.

My stepdad called me to check up on our dogs, we got to the conversation of me wanting a job again so he offered some ideas on how to go about looking (googling MRI places near me then calling them and asking) after the second attempt I got some one to give me their fax number so I can fax my resume. Now he’s helping me touch it up and fax it, I know it’s wishful thinking but I really want a job so hopefully these guys will take me

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Lgbtqia+ books edit 01 - How to Be a Normal Person by T.J Klune

“I’ll go first. I don’t normally wear Hawaiian shirts, flip-flops, and jeans with holes in them. The only reason I did that was because I heard you call me abnormal and weird and strange and I didn’t like that because even though I pretended not to, I thought you were the most interesting person I’d ever met. So I went home, remembered I didn’t have the internet, went to the library, got accused of gang-bang babies, spoke to Mitzi with i’s and y’s, got the internet, found porn in the first three minutes, and then looked up how to be a normal person…”