first congress

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Wondering what a call to Congress actually sounds like? We got you.

If you’re on this website (or a human alive today) there’s a really good chance you’re afraid to call your Senator/Representative because you don’t know how the phone call will go. We’re trying to remove some of the mystery around calling your elected representative to show you a few different examples of first time callers leaving a comment with their Congressional office. It’s so easy!

On this call, you see Victoria learning that sometimes you have to call a few different offices to get through. You should also know that if you’re not calling from a big state like New York or California, you’re much less likely to have this problem. Either way, on average even the long calls take less than five minutes. Just make sure you call during standard work hours. Take a bathroom break to make the call if you have to. Promise it won’t take too long.

Read more about how to call your congressional representative here.

Okay people, history-fail story-time...

So back in the 1780′s when our country was still figuring crap out and ol’ George Washington was just elected president, G.W. decided to send a letter to Congress along the lines of ‘Looking forward to working with you all, this will be exciting!” Congress, not wanting to slight the president and also trying to express their own enthusiasm, sent back a letter along the lines of “Glad you’re excited, we are also looking forward to working with you!”

Then George sends another letter back saying something like “Cool cool bros, glad you’re just as excited as I am,” and Congress, again not wanting to be awkward or just ignore the PRESIDENT, sent back ANOTHER letter saying some dumb crap that was probably along the lines of “Glad you’re excited that we’re excited that you’re excited.”

Democracy at its finest.

And while this in itself is funny, that is not even the best part.

George Washington, while being powerful, was not extremely eloquent, and at this point was also aging, busy, and overall very stressed about his new position (which he did not want in the first place).  So he asked his old friend James Madison, who had a much better way with words, to write the first note to Congress.  Good old James Madison, wanting to oblige his friend, did just that and composed the note to Congress.  Now, J-Mads was himself a member of Congress, so when the note arrived, he was in session to hear “Washington’s” letter read.

Congress got nervous and worried about who could possibly compose a formal and acceptable letter back to Washington.  Who better than his old friend, James Madison?  So Jimmy, being obliging, wrote the response.  When Washington received the reply, he once again asked his friend to write the response.  

And who did Congress choose to write their final letter? That’s right….none other than Jimmy-James-Madison himself.

So James Madison, future 4th president of the United States, wrote himself 4 letters under the guise of George Washington and the first Congress of the U.S.  And he was too embarrassed to admit it.

anonymous asked:

You said the Republican party fought against slavery.. That is true, but the Republican party around that time period have more modern Democrat beliefs. They were northerners who believed in equal rights. And the Democratic party in the 1800s had view more similar to modern Republican beliefs. The party's beliefs flip flopped around late 1800s-early 1900s.. The conservative states were always advocating for slavery and oppression. They were also the last states to give women the right to vote.

Originally posted by onemorechapter11

Let’s discuss some history then.

1791 - The Democratic-Republican Party is formed by James Madison and Thomas Jefferson against Alexander Hamilton’s Federalist Party. The Democratic-Republicans strongly opposed government overreach and expansion, the creation of a national bank, and corruption.

1804 - Andrew Jackson purchases the plantation that will become his primary source of wealth.

1824 - The Democratic-Republican Party split. The new Democrats were supported by Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren, and the National Republicans were supported by John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay.

1828 - Andrew Jackson is elected President of the United States.

1830 - Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, whereby the Cherokee and other native tribes were to be forcibly removed from their lands.

1831 - Cherokee Nation v. Georgia, whereby the Supreme Court ruled that Cherokee Nation was sovereign and the U.S. had no jurisdiction over Cherokee lands. Andrew Jackson had already started to enforce the removal of the Choctaw.

1832-33 - The Whig Party is formed in opposition to Jackson’s government expansion and overreach in the Nullification Crisis and the establishment of a Second National Bank. The Whig Party successfully absorbs the National Republican Party.

1838 -  Many Indian tribes had been forcibly removed. Under Jackson, General Winfield Scott and 7,000 soldiers forced the Cherokee from their land at bayonet point while their homes were pillaged. They marched the Cherokee more than 1,200 miles to the allocated Indian territory. About 5,000 Cherokee died on the journey due to starvation and disease.

1854 - The Whig Party dissolves over the question of the expansion of slavery. Anti-slavery Whigs and anti-slavery democrats form the Republican Party with their sole goal being to end slavery.

1861 -The election of President Lincoln spurs the beginning of the Civil War.

1862 - Lincoln writes a letter where he declares he wishes to preserve the union regardless of the morals on slavery. He issues the Emancipation Proclamation, whereby all slaves in Union territories had to be freed. As states came under Union control, those slaves too had to be freed.

1863 - Frederick Douglass, former slave and famous Republican abolitionist, meets with Lincoln on the suffrage of emancipated slaves.

1864 - Lincoln revised his position on slavery in a letter to Albert G. Hodges stating “If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong.”

1865 - Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrenders at the Appomattox Courthouse to Union victory. After Lincoln’s Assassination, Democrat President Johnson issues amnesty to rebels and pardons the slave owners of their crimes.

1865 - The 13th Amendment which ended slavery passed with 100% Republican support and 63% Democrat support in congress.

1866 - The Klu Klux Klan is formed by Confederate veterans to intimidate black and Republicans through violence, lynching, and public floggings. They gave open support to the Democrat Party.

1866 - The Civil Rights Act of 1866 is vetoed by Democratic President Andrew Johnson. Every single Republican voted and overturned the veto.

1868 - The 14th Amendment which gave citizenship to freed slaves passed with 94% Republican support and 0% Democrat support in congress. The first grand wizard of the KKK, Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest is honored at the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

1868 - Representative James Hinds who taught newly freedmen of their rights is murdered by the KKK.

1870 - The 15th Amendment which gave freed slaves the right to vote passed with 100% Republican support and 0% Democrat support in congress.

1871 - The violence of the KKK grew so savage that congress passed the Enforcement Acts to repress their influence.

1875 - Democrat Senator William Saulsbury speaks out against the Civil RIghts Act of 1875, claiming it will allow “colored men shall sit at the same table beside the white guest; that he shall enter the same parlor and take his seat beside the wife and daughter of the white man, whether the white man is willing or not, because you prohibit discrimination against him.“

1884 - A train conductor orders Ida B. Wells, a black Republican woman, to give up her seat and move to the smoking car. Wells was an investigative journalist who worked for a Republican journal to expose the horror of lynching. She advocated for the 2nd amendment rights for blacks so that they could protect themselves, and she denounced the Democratic Party for treating blacks as property unequal to whites.

1892 - Democrat Benjamin Tillman is re-elected to the Senate. He was a white supremacist who boasted his participation in lynchings. He is quoted saying that “as long as the Negroes continue to ravish white women we will continue to lynch them.”

1915 - Democrat President Woodrow Wilson screens KKK promotion film Birth of a Nation. The film pictured blacks as ignorant and violent savages, and the Klu Klux Klan as rescuers and protectors of the civilized world. The popularity of the movie revived the Klu Klux Klan which had previously gone extinct. Reportedly Wilson said about the film that “[it] is like writing history with lightning, and my only regret is that it is all so terribly true.”

1919 - The 19th Amendment which officially gave women the right to vote passed with 82% Republican support and 54% Democrat support in congress.

1924 - Thousands of Klansmen attend the 1924 Democratic National Convention.

1933 -  The chief Nazi newspaper, Volkischer Beobachter, praised “Roosevelt’s adoption of National Socialist strains of thought in his economic and social policies” and “the development toward an authoritarian state.”

1933 - Democrat President Franklin Delano Roosevelt passes the Agricultural Adjustment Act with the well-meaning goal to help farmers and sharecroppers. Instead, though it aided white farmers, it resulted in increased unemployment and displacement of black farmers.

1933 -  FDR established the National Recovery Administration to stimulate business recovery by forcing employers to pay higher wages for less work. This relief program was enforced on a local level and allowed Jim Crow racism to flourish, resulting in many blacks being fired to be replaced by whites. 

1934 -  The Federal Housing Administration is introduced under FDR. The FHA made homeownership accessible for whites, but explicitly refused to back loans to black people or even other people who lived near black people.

1936 - The Roosevelt Administration finally begins vying for the black vote. Though the relief programs neglected blacks, their communities were bombarded with advertisements. FDR began to garner black support though the vast majority remained economically unchanged and locked into poverty.

1942 - FDR orders American citizens of Japanese ancestry from their homes into interment camps without due process after the bombings at Pearl Harbor.

1953 - Senator Robert Byrd is elected into congress and remains a staunch Democrat until his death in 2010. He was a prominent member in the KKK and praised by Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, and Hillary Clinton.

1955 - Democrat Richard Daley is elected mayor of Chicago. He resisted residential desegregation, defended public school segregation, and used urban renewal funds to build massive public housing projects that kept blacks within existing ghettos.

1957 - The Civil Rights Act of 1957 is passes with 93% Republican support and 59% Democrat support.

1963 - After the assassination of JFK, Lyndon B. Johnson is sworn into office. LBJ was a Democrat remembered by a famous quote: “I’ll have them niggers voting Democrat for the next 200 years.”

1965 - The Voting Rights Act of 1965 passes with 94% Republican support and 73% Democrat support.

1968 - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is assassinated. MLK voted Republican.

1960-70s - A total of 24 Democratic members of congress switched to become Republican over a 20 year period. The majority of democrats in that time period remained democrats.

1995 - Dreams from My Father by Barack Obama is published. Obama discusses how the urban cities would become the new plantation for blacks under Democrat political bosses: “The plantation, the blacks have the worst jobs, the worst housing, police brutality rampant; but when the so-called black committee man come around election time, we’d all line up and vote the straight Democratic ticket. Sell our souls for a Christmas turkey. White folks spit in our faces, and we reward them with the vote.“

2009 - Hillary Clinton lauds Margaret Sanger, KKK advocate, white supremacist, and eugenicist at the 2009 Planned Parenthood Honors Gala: “I admire Margaret Sanger enormously, her courage, her tenacity, her vision. I am really in awe of her, there are a lot of lessons we can learn from her life.”

Me: 1
History revisionism: 0

Originally posted by whiteangelxoxo

anonymous asked:

How do you think history will remember Hillary Clinton?

She is the first woman to be a major party nominee for President; one of just five Americans in history to lose a Presidential election despite winning the popular vote; had the highest margin of victory in the popular vote of any losing Presidential candidate; more voters cast their ballot for her than every other Presidential candidate in American history – winning or losing – besides Barack Obama. She’s also one of the most prominent Secretaries of State in American history and visited more countries than any other Secretary of State. 

Hillary Clinton is also arguably the most influential First Lady in history. She’s the only First Lady to run for office and win elections in her own right. As a U.S. Senator from New York she was popular with her constituents and highly-respected on both sides of the aisle (yes, really) during her time in Congress. As First Lady she was President Clinton’s most valued adviser and political strategist. If not for what she brought to their partnership, it’s doubtful that Bill Clinton could have even won the 1992 election.

And, of course, she has an entire body of work in the first half of her life that was completely unrelated to who she was married to. Hillary was a powerful lawyer, talented political strategist, energetic activist, and a tireless advocate, particularly on behalf of children.

I don’t know for sure what the final judgment of Hillary Clinton’s legacy will be, but she’s undoubtedly one of the most important women in American history and one of the most prominent and influential political figures of the past half-century. Those who suggest that Hillary’s ultimate legacy will be as the person who lost the 2016 election and put Donald Trump in the White House are flat-out wrong. She was the person who stood strong against him in the midst of an unprecedented political storm, no matter what mistakes might have been made by her or her campaign during the 2016 election cycle. Hillary Clinton didn’t elect Donald Trump as the President of the United States; the American people did. Her legacy shouldn’t be tainted by the poor choices of the American electorate and the consequences of those choices. She should be remembered for the path that she blazed for those who followed her in public service.

4

Trump reportedly pulls Iraq from new travel ban, delays its signing

  • Late Tuesday, the Trump administration abruptly pulled Iraq from a list of seven majority-Muslim nations whose citizens were to be subject to a temporary travel ban to the U.S., the Associated Press reported.
  • Trump, despite strong opposition, defiantly vowed to forge on with a new order blocking travelers — including refugees — from the seven nations.
  • However, CNN’s Jeremy Diamond quoted a senior administration official saying the signing of the ban would be delayed until “later this week,” so it could have its own “moment.” Read more (3/1/17 6:57 AM) 

Trump’s VOICE is trying to paint immigrants as criminals. Heres why that’s wrong.

  • During his first speech to Congress Tuesday evening, Trump announced the creation of a Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement (VOICE)— an office dedicated to serving victims of violent crimes at the hands of undocumented immigrants.
  • Audible boos and loud groans followed his announcement.
  • While victims of violent crimes deserve support, Trump’s use of these limited examples to paint violent crime committed by undocumented immigrants as statistically significant risks stoking xenophobia. 
  • The epidemic he was trying to highlight, and the idea that immigrants steal Americans’ dreams, just isn’t the reality. 
  • Immigrants in the U.S., including undocumented immigrants, commit fewer violent crimes than the general population. 
  • Studies show that not only do immigrants commit fewer crimes than those born in the United States, but also they go to jail less, at a rate of about one-fifth of native-born Americans. Read more (3/1/17 7:16 AM)

“I first ran for Congress in 1999, and I got beat. I just got whooped. I had been in the state legislature for a long time, I was in the minority party, I wasn’t getting a lot done, and I was away from my family and putting a lot of strain on Michelle. Then for me to run and lose that bad, I was thinking maybe this isn’t what I was cut out to do. I was forty years old, and I’d invested a lot of time and effort into something that didn’t seem to be working. But the thing that got me through that moment, and any other time that I’ve felt stuck, is to remind myself that it’s about the work. Because if you’re worrying about yourself—if you’re thinking: ‘Am I succeeding? Am I in the right position? Am I being appreciated?’ – then you’re going to end up feeling frustrated and stuck. But if you can keep it about the work, you’ll always have a path. There’s always something to be done.”

What are your rights at a protest?

Animation by KAPWA Studioworks

Citizen activism is as American as apple pie. Whether you call it a protest, a parade, a tea party, a town hall, a march, a sit-in, a patriotic rally, a picket line, a free speech event, or a nonviolent demonstration, your right to stand up peacefully for what you believe in is protected by the US Constitution. Read the  First Amendment:

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

To learn how to turn protest into powerful change, watch this TED-Ed Lesson.

Ready to exercise your constitutionally protected right to protest? Before you go, know your rights. Below, read an excerpt from the American Civil Liberties Union guidelines for protestors. [For a pdf of the full ACLU ‘Know Your Rights’ guidelines for protestors, click here.]

Keep reading

Donald Trump misled Americans about terrorism once again in his first speech to Congress

“The vast majority of individuals convicted of terrorism and terrorism-related offenses since 9/11 came here from outside of our country,” Trump said, citing unspecified “data” from the Justice Department. “It is not compassionate, but reckless, to allow uncontrolled entry from places where proper vetting cannot occur.”

The irony is that the United States has been a sanctuary for extremists for centuries. Homegrown white American terrorism has been key to maintaining our nation’s racial caste system ever since its foundation. Slavery, Redemption and Jim Crow were all fueled by campaigns of racial terror — both judicial and extrajudicial — committed by whites against blacks. Between 1877 and 1950 alone, more than 4,000 lynchings targeting black people took place. White right-wing terrorists have killed 50 Americans since 2001.

Yet Trump’s data is skewed such that it ignores this history and its antecedents, including the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995 and Dylann Roof’s attack in Charleston, South Carolina, in July 2015. Instead, the president relied on a technicality to frame foreign-bred terrorists — specifically, Muslims — as the real threat to Americans’ safety.

Here’s the truth: the primary reason why the “vast majority” of people convicted of terrorism since 9/11 have been foreign-born is because there is no federal statute to prosecute homegrown terrorism. By definition, the crime of terrorism — under federal law — requires there to be a foreign connection, experts have confirmed to Mic.

That’s why Roof could massacre nine innocent churchgoers in an act of racial and political violence and still not be charged with a terrorist offense. Read more (3/1/17 11:34 AM)

In an unprecedented first, the Congress of the American Wizarding Confederation unanimously voted today to support the decision of newly appointed President Marla Bolton not to meet with the newly elected President of the United States, Donald Trump. Since the inception of the AWC and its Muggle counterpart the USA, the President of the Wizarding Congress has met with every Muggle President to discuss the true nature of the magical world and reinforce certain pacts of secrecy and mutual cooperation between the two nations. While some of these meetings went more smoothly than others, the tradition has been a constant for over two hundred years.  

President Bolton released her decision last week in a press-conference that shook the magical world to its core: “After much deliberation and a careful observation of Muggle President Trump, my offices and I have decided that while the long-standing tradition of cooperation between the magical and mundane worlds is valuable one, we cannot in good conscience expose our world and the people and creatures in it to man such as President Trump. There are serious concerns not only about how Mr. Trump would take the news of a magical world existing alongside his own, but about his discretion in such matters. We will, of course, continue to provide protections for the Muggle leader in the form of highly trained Aurors and members of the DSO, but at this time and for the foreseeable future, we will not reveal ourselves to the current administration or any of its offices.”

Congress immediately entered into deliberations, but after numerous and lengthy meetings of the whole counsel, which included briefings from the Department-Heads of the nine governmental agencies and the Headmasters and Mistresses of the Seven Schools of Sorcery, it was clear that Madam President’s decision would stand. The leaders of our esteemed centers of education were especially vocal in their support of the President’s decision, with Headmistress Mariame Odinson of Black Gate delivering a pointed speech punctuated with ringing blows from her hammer, and Headmistress Theodora Dimon of the Laveau Academy showing how all divinations on the matter implied utter disaster if the President was ignored. The fact that the Laveau Headmistress’s dire proclamations seemed based at least in part on the fact that such an act would upset her, personally, as well as all of her staff and alumni, was not lost on members of the Congress.

“We have not always trusted or liked the leaders of the Muggle world,” said Headmaster Lanskey of the Salem Institute, who closed the comments section from the Seven School’s representatives, “And I am certain they would not always have approved of ours, had they been in a similar position to judge, but until today there has always been a sense that the Magical Congress could trust the motives and discretion of the Muggle President. Sadly that is not the case now. Though I do not agree with many of President Bolton’s views on the matters of Wizarding-Muggle relations, I think she has made a well reasoned decision to keep the Trump Administration in the dark concerning our existence. I can only pray that this particular period in our mutual history will be a short one, and no long lasting precedent will be set.”

-Charles Goodwin, The Boston Bibliomancer, March 1, 2017.

svfferign  asked:

ok asshat half the country has the era 3 test within the next week so tell us The Important Things in the shittiest meme-iest fashion ever go

Aight lets do this!!

1754-1763: French-Indian War - a mess, it’s England and France back at it again with the war thing

1754: a Young Wash™ loses Fort Necessity, goodbye General Braddock 😵

1763: Treaty of Paris pt. 1 - France loses A Lot of land (Canada, the Mississippi) but keeps the Money Islands in the Caribbean

1763: Proclamation of 1763 - the colonists can’t move to the land they fought for, they do it anyway because they are strong independent Americans who don’t need no rules

1764: Sugar Act - makes The Bostonians salty, but not much else happens, gets repealed

1765: Stamp Act my dudes, England needs The Monies™ and we gotta pay

1765: The Sons of Liberty gets lit, organized boycotts

1766: Declatory Act - “we rule you shut up” - parliament to the colonies

1767: disbands NY Assembly to make everyone agree not to mutiny, also starts the new taxes for the tea☕️, lead⛓, paint🎨, and paper📑(don’t anger the lawyers)

1770: The Boston Massacre - not really a massacre, but that’s not important once it hits Georgia (🖕🏻🖕🏻England). Like 5 people died. John Adams reps the soldiers

1772: The Sons of Liberty gets lit again, burns down the HMS Gaspee

1773: The Boston Tea Party 🐸☕️- because causing millions of dollars in losses is the American Way (Sam Adams burns down more boats), mostly because of the Tea Act

1774: The Intolerable Acts - stops the govt, closed Boston, lets British soldiers sleep in houses. ITS TIME FOR REVOLUTION!!!! 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

1774: the First Continental Congress, wants reconciliation, sends list of receipts on Britain, starts low-key making an army, really doesn’t do that much after that

1775: shots fired 🔫🔫Lexington and Concord. Paul Revere does the thing (HE SAID THE REGULARS ARE COMING NOT THE BRITISH ARE COMING MY DUDES)

1775: a New, Older Wash™ is appointed Commander in Chief, only bc he promised to fight for free (also, him big™)

1775: Bunker Hill, a loss for America, a mess, Siege of Boston, a win for America, but still a mess

1776: The Instigator Year, everything goes down. Common Sense, Washington loses New York, Battle of Trenton, Cross the Delaware,

1776: The Congress says “suck it England” and signs the Declaration

1777: Saratoga, General Burgoyne surrenders to Gates, France begins to notice (also, Lafayette gets shot in the leg at Brandywine and doesn’t notice)

1777: A gay Prussian saves the Army (von Steuben)

1778: Sugar Daddy France agrees to give us money and huge boats, with guns….gunboats

1781: British surrender at Yorktown, Cornwallis is salty and doesn’t come to negotiations

1783: Treaty of Paris pt. 2 - Adams, Jay, and Franklin end the war

1785: Northwest Ordinance, sets out how to become a state, how to divide land (why a lot of western states are squares)

1786: Shays’s Rebellion, the grand old tradition of hating taxes is back, they close the courts at Boston to stop them taking farms

1787: The shitshow that is the Constitutional Convention begins. Federalists v. Anti-Federalists is big govt. vs. small govt. Hamilton talks for 6 hours, cannot shut up

1787: The Federalist Papers, 85 essays defending the Constitution. HAMILTON WROTE. THE OTHER 51!!!

1787: The 3/5 Compromise for reps in the house, finally gets the constitution passed

1789: a Very Tired Wash™ is elected president

1791: Ham man wants his financial plan passed (National Bank, whisky tax, assume states debts, industry), but the Democratic Republicans don’t want it. Only gets passed because they agree to move the capital south (the room where it happens)

1790s: political parties happen divided over the French Revolution (Republicans love it, the Federalists hate it). Republicans led by The Jeffs and Jemmy Mads

1793: The Neutrality Proclamation gets tested by Citizen Genet. Wants to recruit for fighting for France. A Mess™

1794: Jay’s Treaty sort of fails, but gets us trade with England. He’s burned in effigy, Ham is stoned by a mob defending it

1795: Pinckney’s Treaty gets access to the Mississippi

1796: His Rotundy (Adams) gets elected, The Jeffs is VP. It’s messy.

1797: The XYZ Affair, they want the money, we don’t want to give them the money to negotiate. Messy

1798: The Alien and Sedition Acts - don’t be mean to Adams, it makes him cry. It’s harder to become a citizen

1798-1799: The Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions want to nullify the unconstitutional Acts, which in itself is unconstitutional, so…..

1800: The Election “Revolution” of 1800 is probably the messiest election ever. Adams says Jefferson is dead, Jeffs retaliates, its awful

1800: The Electoral College has a tie with Jeffs and AyyAyyron Burr, Hamilton ends up breaking the tie. This works out great. (It doesn’t, he gets shot 4 years later)

US Missile Strike on Syria

“I understand that the humanitarian crisis in Syria is horrifying. But it is critical to understand that this US military action could trigger international war with China, India, and Russia. We entered WWI 100 years ago today. It seems the world has learned nothing since.

Did you really believe them when they told you the cause? Did you really believe that this war would end wars?”

independent.co.uk
Almost every big claim Donald Trump just made was false
Donald Trump has completed his first ever speech to Congress as President. And almost every major claim made in it appeared to be false.

Andrew Griffin at The Independent:

Donald Trump has completed his first ever speech to Congress as President. And almost every major claim made in it appeared to be false.

He appeared to wrongly claim that he was responsible for a vast reduction in the price of the F-35 jet, as well as falsely characterising a report into the problems of immigration.

The President’s speech made contested claims about the value of immigration, his success in office, his plans for tax reform, and healthcare coverage.

While much of the speech was focused on the same rhetoric that Mr Trump led his campaign with – including a commitment to bring jobs back to the US and boost the military – he also made a number of factual claims about his work as president.

Here are some of those false claims in full, as fact checked by the Associated Press.

TRUMP: “According to the National Academy of Sciences, our current immigration system costs America’s taxpayers many billions of dollars a year.”

THE FACTS: That’s not exactly what that report says. It says immigrants “contribute to government finances by paying taxes and add expenditures by consuming public services.”

The report found that while first-generation immigrants are more expensive to governments than their native-born counterparts, primarily at the state and local level, immigrants’ children “are among the strongest economic and fiscal contributors in the population.”

The report found that the “long-run fiscal impact” of immigrants and their children would probably be seen as more positive “if their role in sustaining labour force growth and contributing to innovation and entrepreneurial activity were taken into account.”

TRUMP: “We’ve saved taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars by bringing down the price” of the F-35 jet fighter.

THE FACTS: The cost savings he persists in bragging about were secured in full or large part before he became president.

The head of the Air Force program announced significant price reductions in the contract for the Lockheed F-35 fighter jet Dec. 19 — after Trump had tweeted about the cost but weeks before he met the company’s CEO about it.

Pentagon managers took action even before the election to save money on the contract. Richard Aboulafia, an analyst with the aerospace consulting firm Teal Group, said there is no evidence of any additional cost savings as a result of Trump’s actions.

TRUMP: “We will provide massive tax relief for the middle class.”

THE FACTS: Trump has provided little detail on how this would happen. Independent analyses of his campaign’s tax proposals found that most of the benefits would flow to the wealthiest families. The richest 1 percent would see an average tax cut of nearly $215,000 a year, while the middle one-fifth of the population would get a cut of just $1,010, according to the Tax Policy Center, a joint project by the Brookings Institution and Urban Institute.

TRUMP: “Ninety-four million Americans are out of the labour force.”

THE FACTS: That’s true, but for the vast majority of them, it’s because they choose to be.

That 94 million figure includes everyone aged 16 and older who doesn’t have a job and isn’t looking for one. So it includes retirees, parents who are staying home to raise children, and high school and college students who are studying rather than working.

They are unlikely to work regardless of the state of the economy. With the huge baby-boomer generation reaching retirement age and many of them retiring, the population of those out of the labor force is increasing and will continue to do so, most economists forecast.

It’s true that some of those out of the workforce are of working age and have given up looking for work. But that number is probably a small fraction of the 94 million Trump cited.

TRUMP: “Obamacare is collapsing … imploding Obamacare disaster.”

THE FACTS: There are problems with the 2010 health care law, but whether it’s collapsing is hotly disputed.

One of the two major components of the Affordable Care Act has seen a spike in premiums and a drop in participation from insurers. But the other component, equally important, seems to be working fairly well, even if its costs are a concern.

Trump and congressional Republicans want to repeal the whole thing, which risks leaving millions of people uninsured if the replacement plan has shortcomings. Some critics say GOP rhetoric itself is making things worse by creating uncertainty about the future.

The health law offers subsidised private health insurance along with a state option to expand Medicaid for low-income people. Together, the two arms of the program cover more than 20 million people.

Republican governors whose states have expanded Medicaid are trying to find a way to persuade Congress and the administration to keep the expansion, and maybe even build on it, while imposing limits on the long-term costs of Medicaid.

While the Medicaid expansion seems to be working, the markets for subsidised private health insurance are stressed in many states. Also affected are millions of people who buy individual policies outside the government markets, and face the same high premiums with no financial help from the health law.

Larry Levitt of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation says “implosion” is too strong a term. An AP count found that 12.2 million people signed up for this year, despite the Trump administration’s threats to repeal the law.

But a health care blogger and industry consultant, Robert Laszewski, agrees with Trump, saying too few young, healthy people have signed up to guarantee the stability of the insurance markets.

TRUMP: His budget plan will offer “one of the largest increases in national defence spending in American history”.

THE FACTS: Three times in recent years, Congress raised defence budgets by larger percentages than the 54 billion dollars, or 10%, increase Mr Trump proposes. The base defence budget grew by 41 billion dollars, or 14.3%, in 2002; by 37 billion dollars, or 11.3%, in 2003, and by 47 billion dollars, or 10.9%, in 2008, according to Defence Department figures.

TRUMP: “According to data provided by the Department of Justice, the vast majority of individuals convicted for terrorism-related offences since 9/11 came here from outside of our country. We have seen the attacks at home - from Boston to San Bernardino to the Pentagon and yes, even the World Trade Centre.”

THE FACTS: It is unclear what Justice Department data he’s citing, but the most recent government information does not back up his claim. Just over half the people Mr Trump talks about were born in the US, according to Homeland Security Department research revealed last week. That report said of 82 people the government determined were inspired by a foreign terrorist group to attempt or carry out an attack in the US, just over half were native-born.

Even the attacks Mr Trump singled out were not entirely the work of foreigners. (name withheld out of respect for the victims), who along with his Pakistani wife killed 14 people in the 2015 attack in San Bernardino, California, was born in Chicago.

It is true that in the immediate aftermath of September 11, the FBI’s primary concern was with terrorists from overseas feared to be plotting attacks in the US, but that is no longer the case.

The FBI and the Justice Department have been preoccupied with violent extremists from inside the US who are inspired by the calls to violence and mayhem of the Islamic State group. The Justice Department has prosecuted scores of IS-related cases since 2014, and many of the defendants are US citizens.

Today in Politics: March 1, 2017
  • Jewish children are being pulled from schools as there have recently been over 100 bomb threats. (CNN)(LATIMES)(HILL)(Map of Threats)
  • The Senate voted to confirm Ryan Zinke as the head the Department of Interior. Zinke has agreed that the climate is changing but said the impact by humans was subject to debate. (WP)(CNN)(FOX)
  • Kellyanne Conway will not be subjected to “discipline” after her endorsement of Ivanka Trump’s products. (HILL)(NPR)(TIME)
  • Supreme Court says Republicans who did Virginia redistricting must be reexamined for racial bias. (HILL)(WP)(Official Statement)
  • Updates on VOICE [Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement]: It is not clear as to whether or not it will be limited to undocumented immigrants or all immigrants. The goal of VOICE, according to Trump, is to “provide a voice to those who have been ignored by the media, silenced by special interests”. (CNN)(IND)(BI)
  • DOW has reached an all time today. (HILL)(CNBC)
  • The President made his first address to Congress yesterday, view Front Burner’s summary (here)
  • Trump Administration delayed a rule aimed at protecting workers saving for retirement (HILL)(CNN)(FORBES)(WP)
  • Trump is reportedly signing an executive order regarding the coal industry and climate rules. (HILL)(WP)(TIME)

Updates:

  • It has now been revealed that Jeff Sessions, now U.S. Attorney General, spoke twice to the Russian ambassador last year. He did not disclose this information in his confirmation hearing. (WP)(HILL)
2

225th Anniversary of the First Congress: We’ll be posting documents and stories highlighting the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through March 2016.

On April 5, 1790, President George Washington forwarded Congress copies of New York’s February 24 ratification of Articles One and Three through Twelve of the Bill of Rights.

New York was the 7th state to ratify amendments to the Constitution. The Bill of Rights officially became part of the Constitution on December 15, 1791 when three-fourths of the states ratified articles three through twelve.

Letter from President George Washington Transmitting Copies of New York’s Ratification of the Bill of Rights, 4/5/1790, SEN1A-E2, Records of the U.S. Senate

things i know about the states
  • Alabama - racist and homophobic. i think u like statues cuz you’ve got a giant fucking one called vulcan thats like what? 100,000 pounds?? ??? wow. very extra. 
  • Alaska - i only know one person from alaska but they’re a trump supporter going to art school so i imagine they aren’t having a great time. also my parents ditched me in illinois for a week to go there on vacation. lots of bears.
  • Arizona - irrational hatred of mexicans in the southern part. my pe coach from elementary school who is now a convicted pedophile loved it there. very hot but not humid. cacti. you serve rattlesnake and rabbit sausage and i was forced to sit and watch as my brother ate it just to spite me. 
  • Arkansas - like alabama but a lil better. you’ve got the whole southern hospitality thing goin’ on. you made it illegal for a rivers water level to rise above a bridge. how are y’all gonna enforce that? tell nature to stop?
  • California - very liberal but the three people i know who live there are hella conservative. suffocate them. do it for me. also pretty chill people but don’t take criticism well. gay
  • Colorado - nice weather. outdoorsy people. wyomings less racist cousin. lots of critters. nice people but no chill about skiing or snowboarding.
  • Connecticut - people go through ur state to get to other states. everyone i know from connecticut is not there now. 
  • Delaware - people go to ur state to shop since y’all don’t have a sales tax. ur really fucking flat. ur gonna be one of the first to go with rising sea levels. also no national parks??? 
  • Florida - my uncle worked on airplanes in miami for 50 years and hated it. you fucked us all. the only person i know from florida doesn’t believe in evolution. racists up north, gays in the south. disney world
  • Georgia - coca cola and the walking dead. people only care about atlanta. art hoes chill in savannah. had first college for women. for some reason ur not allowed to live on a boat for more than 30 days in a year??? ? why
  • Hawaii - you get a lot of tourists and they’re usually inadvertently racist. v liberal. the Most liberal in the country. screw california. lots of culture. good food. 
  • Idaho - potatoes. a made up word. ppl thought it was indian but it wasn’t. its gibberish. nice. a metric fuckton of gem stones.
  • Illinois -north is liberal. south is, according to my mom who grew up there, ‘the armpit of the rest of the state.’ her town was small & when it tried to start a kkk they couldn’t because people recognized their shoes. my grandma is 45 minutes away from the nearest walmart. 
  • Indiana - home to mike pence. crazy corn people. my mom’s bff lives there and she’s crazy but super sweet. inidana means ‘indian land’ but that obvs didn’t work out. also there’s a law against fishing with dynamite and guns?? ? 
  • Iowa - actually make more corn than indiana but don’t tell them. also make a fuckton of alcohol. ur name is mostly vowels which is gr8. also first female lawyer. ppl are typically nice, but also might shoot u
  • Kansas - contains the geographic center of the US. first woman mayor. my dad ditched me in illinois to pick up an RV in kansas. passionate about trucks. 
  • Kentucky - don’t go if u have allergies. to anything. horses and racism. also fried chicken. u aren’t allowed to throw eggs at public speakers or you could go to jail. lots of weird space shit. u built a town in a meteor crater which is cool.
  • Louisiana - people only care about jazz and the new orleans. lots of drunk ass college kids. humid af. sorry u have to live with that. u follow napoleon law instead of english common law like literally every other state. less racist than others but still kinda racist. 
  • Maine - might as well be canada. lotsa lobsters and trees. not allowed to keep christmas decorations up after the 14 of january?? only one syllable. people are chill. my dads friends own some islands up there. like small islands. chunks of rock really. they aren’t rich but they are usually drunk. 
  • Maryland - obsessed with ur flag and crabs. old bay on everything not just crabs. chocolate, popcorn, regular corn, potatoes. u need help. identity issues. north or south? who knows? they dont. also jousting is the state sport?? and ur judges wear red robes? called ‘america in miniature’ ur the only state with an official exercise and its…walking jfc
  • Massachusetts - will tell everyone they are from mass. ur not allowed to be cold because they have been Colder. ur state is too hot 4 them. lots of smart colleges, lots of dumb people. good hospitals and healthcare. v progressive. probably learned too much about them in 8th grade us history. first to legalize gay marriage A+
  • Michigan - the people i know from Michigan are incredibly salty about flint and pretty artistic/creative. lots of lakes. giant fucking lakes. literally named for an indian word that means ‘giant fucking lakes’ ur the only place in the gotdamn world with a floating post office. makes sense cuz ur mostly fucking lake. 
  • Minnesota - no one really knows what u do. you’d be like the quiet emo kid that sits in the back of the class and says nothing. ur really cold. you’ve got a lot of malls. and a lot of fucking lakes. not big lakes but like 11,000 itsy bitsy lakes. u look like swiss cheese. 
  • Mississippi - racist but getting better…at least you were. ur mostly known for your river. people spell the name of ur state for fun. for some reason you have a cactus plantation???? the worlds only cactus plantation??? ?? why 
  • Missouri - misery Missouri. u really fucking love fountains? only rome has more fountains than kansas city, missouri like? wow. you also have the arch which is great but also a lot of murder. also, a lot of caves which is awesome
  • Montana - mountainy af. do you even have cities? v cold. holds record for coldest temp in US (-70F) and largest snowflake. wow. also illegal to pretend to abuse an animal in front of a minor. nice. first woman in congress. very pretty state but no one lives there. 
  • Nebraska - hell state. flat. its so flat. my family was driving through nebraska??? and like?? your houses are like three miles apart. at a minimum? we drove three hours out of the way to look at fossils. but there weren’t any? and we passed like 16 houses maybe?
  • Nevada - desert trash children. literally just does not rain. las vegas is okay. i went and a homeless dude was telling dirty jokes for money. lots of homeless people. highest suicide rating of any state. i shot a machine gun and strange man came up to me and told me i was a good shot?? 
  • New Hampshire - republican cousin of vermont. lots of nature, which is ironic. very outdoorsy. entire state smells like pine trees. u only have 13 miles of ocean coastline which is v sad. sorry. also not legally required to wear a seat belt??? ur state motto is weirdly intense ‘live free or die’ yikes
  • New Jersey - interesting accent. hair gel up the wazoo on the men. lots of fucking diners. also the worlds biggest statue of a tooth??? ? why?  i know one boy from new jersey who came to college with only five white-wife beaters and two gym shorts. his name was Tony. 
  • New Mexico - arizonas nicer cousin. Not As Hot as you would expect. lots of cacti. super pretty architecture. desert aesthetic and aliens. ur lawmakers don’t get paid?? also ur capital is super cool and v old.
  • New York - ur all assholes but its okay because u have to deal with tourists. liberal and educated but not v nice. superiority complex sometimes. nyc has more people than 39 of the 50 us states. y’all are packed like rats. also lots of celebrities 
  • North Carolina - transphobic af. also u have a lot of sweet potatoes?? ur beaches are generally pretty crowded but can be nice. I have a friend that lives there now; she says the weather is v nice. v good at basketball. 
  • North Dakota - boring. for some reason its still legal to shoot an indian if they’re on horseback and ur in a covered wagon??? obsessed with buffalo. also very cold
  • Ohio - people only care about you around election time. ur flag isn’t a rectangle?? hipster trash. also its illegal to get a fish drunk?? ????? do people even fish in ohio? what is this
  • Oklahoma - u get a lot of tornadoes and most people don’t even care because you kind of suck. ironically u were the last state to declare xmas a legal holiday tho but i guess being first to go for lethal injection makes up for it. not even carrie underwood can save this state. 
  • Oregon - v liberal but to the point of being pretentious. great weather. the people are generally nice but also v weird?? I went and a guy was unironically riding down the street on a penny farthing? p sure everyone is high. also drivers have to yield to pedestrians….who are on the sidewalk??? 
  • Pennsylvania - ur a wannabe confederate state like?? get over it ur in the north pal. also u have the oldest continuously operating book shop in the US and maybe the world. u could have saved us but you didn’t. your weather is v inconsistent. not uncommon to see amish people on the side of a high way in their buggies. your sports fans are kinda scary
  • Rhode Island - smol. first state to stick it to britain. u really like tennis which is weird because ur windy af. first state to abolish death penalty. ur state motto is just the word ‘hope’??? also ur flag looks like a fifth graders art project but its nice?
  • South Carolina - crocodiles and beaches. my cousin and i went down and she made me play pokémon go with her except we were barefoot and it led us right to an 8 foot crocodile. also we found pickled pig parts in a sketchy gas station in a jar. not for sale. just there. also the anti-choice gory fetus signs on the side of the road are classy. 
  • South Dakota - better than north dakota. very pretty. giant fucking fossil named sue. lots of fossils in general. you like big rocks with faces carved onto them. u didn’t stop with the presidents; now ur making one for crazy horse (and it looks better). 
  • Tennessee - ur state is most referenced in a crappy pick up line. you’re to blame for mountain dew. most people only think of graceland and elvis which is fine cuz thats all you care about too. my friend went there and asked for chicken at a fast food restaurant but they didn’t have any and her phone broke. 
  • Texas - not as racist as people think, but still pretty racist. austin is v liberal but thats about it. you keep trying to secede (again) and its as funny as it is pathetic. have a huge bat colony - largest in the world, but they’re mexican freetail bats so u probably want to get rid of them. unironically wear cowboy hats. 
  • Utah - mormons like literally there are so many mormons that its the least diverse state in terms of religion. very pretty tho. ur state motto is just the word ‘industy’ ??? ?? ???? also u really like skiing and snowboarding. 
  • Vermont - v liberal. pure. also should probably be canadian since u make a lot of syrup. also home to ben and jerrys. very green and lots of critters. very pretty mountains. the people are really chill and probably annoyed ppl confuse vermont with new hampshire.
  • Virginia - u can’t drive. ur really competitive with marylanders but its kind of onesided?? u also donated land to build DC. weirdly specific hunting laws? no animals can be hunted on sundays except raccoons which can be hunted until 2 am??? why do u hunt raccoons? very political. lots of history. everyone is named james.
  • Washington - seattle is the only thing people think of unless they’ve seen twilight in which case: forks. very green and grey color scheme. named after the primero prez. home to starbucks like literally there is one on every corner. also u have an active volcano which is cool but it has killed people which isn’t
  • West Virginia - ur very racist but you don’t even try to hide it? u didn’t have a starbucks until 2003. You know coal isn’t coming back and you don’t know why trump thinks he can make it come back. But you voted for him anyway. 
  • Wisconsin - Cheese. v religious and not the loving god kind; very hellfire and brimstone. you have a hamburger hall of fame and u also tried to do the noahs ark theme park but im p sure that didn’t work out well. 
  • Wyoming - racist which is ironic since ur the equality state and also you’re obsessed with guns. yellowstone national park is p much the only reason people go there. you carry shotguns around with you for no good reason. 

anonymous asked:

I'm a bit upset that Hillary supports the assault on Syria..

She does favor taking action in Syria, she’s been vocal about that for a long time and likely would have done things Obama was reluctant to do (& I do agree with some criticisms on Obama’s foreign policy decisions on Syria), but I don’t think she wants to go to war in Syria or will take military action that would lead to war with Syria.

First off, if Hillary was president, I don’t think this would have happened, at least not this early in her presidency and not provoked by US. Trump coddles with Putin, wants to go to war with Iran, and a few days ago his Secretary of State and UN Ambassador publicly said that US don’t care anymore about taking out Assad or assisting Syrians to do so, and before that trump includes Syrian refugees in his ban. It’s not a huge leap to say that those actions and statements emboldened Assad to launch not just any attack, but a chemical attack, to his people. And NOW trump bombs Syria and he lets Russia know before hand but not people in our state department and our allies.

Hillary put in the same situation wouldn’t have taken the same actions in the same way Trump did. I’ve no doubt she would have taken action in and maybe even take out air fields like she said today, but the process and timing wouldn’t be the same. She def wouldn’t have done it in her first 100 days. She would at least go to UN and Congress first. She would talk to our allies. She would think about not just a single military action but what are the consequences of that both in short and long term. She would study intelligence carefully and not just go with her emotions. She wouldnt make dumb statements on our foreign policy that has led us to this, and she wouldn’t have ban Syrian refugees then use Syrian children as props as an excuse to go to war.

United States Declares War on Germany

April 6 1917, Washington–After Wilson’s speech on April 2, both houses of Congress voted on the declaration of war against Germany.  In the Senate, where the Armed Ships Bill had died in the previous Congress, La Follette was only able to put off a vote by one day.  Ultimately, only 6 senators (fewer than had filibustered the Armed Ships Bill) would vote against war on April 4, though the few opponents made themselves known.  Senator Norris of Nebraska, although a Republican, would take a very Bryan-esque tone: “We are going into war upon the command of gold….We are about to put the dollar sign upon the American flag.”  Senator Williams of Mississippi retorted by saying “Wall Street and the money power of the capitalists did not sink the Lusitania.”

The House debated the war the next day; here, the vote would be closer, if still lopsided.  This was due in part to the fact that the Majority Leader, Democrat Claude Kitchin, came out at the last minute against the war:

This nation is the last hope of peace on earth, good will toward men.  I am unwilling for my country to…extinguish during the long night of a world-wide war the only remaining star of hope for Christendom….All the demons of humanity will be let loose for a rampage throughout the world….I shall always believe that we could and ought to have kept out of this war.

Also voting no was Jeannette Rankin, the first woman in Congress, who used her first speech in the House to stand against the war.  Ultimately, the declaration of war would pass by a margin of 373-50 in the wee hours of April 6.  The opponents came from both parties, representing all sorts of constituencies, though two-thirds were from the Midwest.

Despite the lop-sided nature of the vote, it was unclear how much popular support the war had among the American people; in fact, many House members stated that they were voting for the war despite the wishes of their constituents.

At 1:18 PM on April 6, President Wilson signed the resolution declaring that “the state of war…which has thus been thrust upon the United States, is hereby formally declared.”

Today in 1916: Portuguese Forces Cross into German East Africa
Today in 1915:  New German Force Counterattacks in Carpathians
 

Sources include: Michael Kazin, War Against War.

3

225th Anniversary of the First Congress: We’ll be posting documents and stories highlighting the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through March 2016.

On February 2, 1790 the Senate received a petition from printer Francis Bailey asking Congress to patent his innovative printing techniques for preventing counterfeiting. Bailey’s petition was referred to the Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton who reported back to Congress on February 23 that Bailey should be issued “exclusive right” to use his invention.

On March 2 the Senate was sent H.R. 44, an act to give Francis Bailey the exclusive right to use his invention. This was the only patent petition received by the First Congress to result in a private bill. However, the Senate never voted on the bill because of the passage of the Patents Act on April 10, which provided the Patents Commission the ability to issue patents. Bailey’s patent application was placed through the Patents Commission. He was issued a patent for his invention on January 29, 1791.

H.R. 44, an Act to Vest in Francis Bailey, 3/2/1790, SEN1A-C1, Records of the U.S. Senate

MAY 18: Jeannette Rankin (1880-1973)

Jeanette Rankin went from a small town Montana girl to a staunch women’s rights activist and the very first woman to ever be elected to U.S. Congress! It was on this day in 1973 when she passed away at the age of 93.

One of Jeannette’s most quotable quotes was “I may be the first woman member of Congress, but I won’t be the last.” (x).

Jeannette was born in Missoula, Montana on June 11, 1980. Her mother was a schoolteacher and her father was a Scottish-Canadian immigrant who worked as a carpenter. As the eldest of six children, Jeannette spent her childhood helping to raise her younger siblings and laboring on the Rankin family’s ranch. It was her experience of doing equal work as her brothers but receiving unequal recognition and respect that would become the foundation of her feminist identity. Originally graduating from the University of Montana with a degree in Biology, she then enrolled in the New York School of Philanthropy to study social work. It was in New York when Jeannette first became involved in the American suffrage movement and when she became politically awakened.

In February of 1911, Jeannette became the first woman to speak before the Montana legislature when she gave a speech advocating for women’s suffrage. She and her fellow suffragists would work hard for two more years before Montana finally granted women full voting rights in November of 1914. In 1916, Jeannette changed history by running and winning a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives; she was the first woman to serve in Congress in U.S. history! After running a grassroots campaign from Montana train stations and street corners, she was officially elected on November 7, 1916. Throughout her political career, Jeannette was a notable pacifist and champion of women’s rights. She famously voted against America’s entry into both World War I and World War II (she was the ONLY member of Congress to vote against entering World War II).

Waving in front of a campaign car draped in a banner that reads, “NO MORE WAR,” Jeannette not only talked the pacifist talk but she also walked the walk (x).

Jeannette never married and is generally understood to have been a lesbian. After her first college stint at the University of Montana, she took a teaching job in the town of Whitehall, only to be booted from the position after she was discovered to be in a romantic relationship with another woman. The details of the incident are unknown; in the Rankin family’s letters, it is only ever referred to as “Jeannette’s embarrassment.” She went on to have a brief relationship with the journalist Katherine Anthony, but the two eventually separated and simply remained lifelong friends. Despite the few short-lived affairs, Jeannette dedicated her life to social justice work. One of her last public appearances was a 1968 march in Washington D.C. where she led over 5,000 women in protest of the Vietnam War. When she passed away on May 18, 1973, she left her entire estate to the Jeannette Rankin Women’s Scholarship Fund in hopes it would support “mature, unemployed women workers.”

-LC