first and second world wars

There are seven levels of the Being.

The first level is the instinctive human being.

The second level is the emotional human being.

The third level is the intellectual human being.

The fourth level is the equilibrated human being.

The fifth level belongs to those who have built the Astral Body.

The sixth level of human being belongs to those who have built the Mental Body.

The seventh level of human being belongs to those who have built the Causal Body.

The human beings of the first, second, and third level constitute the circle of the confusion of tongues, the Tower of Babel.

These three types of humans are the ones who have disgraced the world, the ones who provoked the first and second world wars, and the ones who will provoke the third.

These three levels of humans do not understand each other.

The instinctive level does not understand the intellectual.

The emotional level does not understand the intellectual.

The intellectual level does not understand the emotional.

The three superior levels constitute the Kingdom.

The inhabitants of the Kingdom have not provoked the two world wars.

The humans of the fourth level are not in the circle of the confusion of tongues; however, neither are they in the Kingdom.

The humans of the fourth level never identify themselves with any particular center of the human machine.

The humans of the fourth level correctly drive the five centers of the human machine.

The five centers of the human machine are: Intellect, emotion, movement, instinct, and sex.

The two superior centers are the superior emotional and the superior mental. These centers can only be used by the inhabitants of the Kingdom.

Mary or Marah, the Woman-Serpent, reminds us of the Kingdom that the Intimate Christ promised to us.

Those who know how to suffer with patience in their trials and work on themselves will inherit the Kingdom.

Obviously, the true human beings are the ones who are the inhabitants of the Kingdom.

The inhabitants of the infernal circle of the confusion of tongues are not human beings. They are merely intellectual animals.

— 

Samael Aun Weor, from his commentary on The Gnostic Bible: The Pistis Sophia Unveiled

Chapter 50

“It came to pass, when Jesus had risen from the dead, that he passed eleven years discoursing with his disciples, and instructing them…”

—The Pistis Sophia

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I’m inspired by women every day who are doing different things. One of my inspirations is Lee Miller, the New York model turned photographer turned war correspondent. I didn’t base my character on her in any way, but she’s an inspiration to me. She was the first female embedded war correspondent who shot and wrote during the second World War and was there for the liberation of Paris. I’ve always loved Lee Miller’s photography. I love women like that who are ahead of the curve and fighting for something they believe in.

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Today marks the 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor which officially catapulted the United States into the Second World War.

This illustration from 1943 depicts Doris “Dorie” Miller (1919-1943), an African-American sailor from Waco, Texas during that fateful morning in 1941 as he defends the fleet at Pearl Harbor from the USS West Virginia. Despite not being trained on the .50 caliber Browning, Miller impressively managed to shoot down an estimated 3 to 4 Japanese planes until he ran out of ammunition. At that point, Miller began to help moving injured sailors out of harm’s way before abandoning the ship.

For his efforts on that day, Miller was awarded the US Navy Cross and was lauded as one of the first American heroes in Second World War (as the pin shows).

Miller would unfortunately be killed in action onboard the USS Liscome Bay during the battle of Makin Island 1943.

(US National Archives, USAmericana)

I’m inspired by women every day who are doing different things. One of my inspirations is Lee Miller, the New York model turned photographer turned war correspondent. I didn’t base my character on her in any way, but she’s an inspiration to me. She was the first female embedded war correspondent who shot and wrote during the second World War and was there for the liberation of Paris. I’ve always loved Lee Miller’s photography. I love women like that who are ahead of the curve and fighting for something they believe in.

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“I’m inspired by women every day who are doing different things. One of my inspirations is Lee Miller, the New York model turned photographer turned war correspondent. I didn’t base my character on her in any way, but she’s an inspiration to me. She was the first female embedded war correspondent who shot and wrote during the second World War and was there for the liberation of Paris. I’ve always loved Lee Miller’s photography. I love women like that who are ahead of the curve and fighting for something they believe in.” 

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Took a trip to The Imperial War Museum the other day. Been trying to post these pictures for a week! It was so inspiring and strange to look at the past like that. All laid out like something from another world. And it was in a way.

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Prince Harry attended The Armistice Day Service at The National Memorial Arboretum in Stafford, England. Armistice Day commemorates the signing of the armistice in WW1 between the Allies and Germany at 11am on November 11, 1918. At the exact time and date each year after Britain has held a two minute silence to remember the dead from the First and Second World Wars. | November 11th, 2016  

November 9, 1916 - Germans Drive back Russians at Lutsk

Pictured - A Russian postcard depicts an engaging scene.

Unlike the Second World War, the First was won in the West. This, plus a good amount of Anglocentrism, has had a detriment to scholarship of the Eastern Front, which lacks even today a recent study in its entirety. But just like in the West, hundreds of important battles raged in the East, and thousands of skirmishes probably every week. One such battle was on November 9, when an unexpected German attack broke the calm that had existed since the end of the Brusilov Offensive, storming through the Russian lines. The Russian took heavy losses and lost several miles of front - just one of many battles that has no note outside of a daily military journal entry.

Artist Impression, Harlow New Town

Harlow was among the first new towns to be founded after the end of the Second World War in the New Towns Act of 1946. Along with others like Stevenage, Hatfield, Crawley and Basildon, the new town of Harlow was designed to accommodate people displaced by the Luftwaffe bombing of London and the South-East. The master plan for the town was designed by Frederick Gibberd, and a number of post war architects worked n the town including Maxwell Fry & Jane Drew, Leonard Mannaseh, Powell & Moya and HT Cadbury -Brown.

Image from The JR James Archive

On April 22, 1915, we saw our first major combat action, Canada’s baptism by fire.
We were undertrained.
We were outnumbered.
We were outgunned.
We fought, killed, and bled for days.
But we held the line.

On that fateful morning in Flanders, a massive gap in our lines developed when an entire french division was annihilated by a cloud of poisonous chlorine gas.
In a few short minutes, the risk of a German breakthrough had escalated into a veritable crisis for Entente forces on the western front.
For the next few days the weight of this impending disaster fell on the shoulders of the volunteers of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

When the well-trained veteran German troops crossed no-man’s land, they expected to occupy a trench full of corpses unopposed.

The last thing they expected was a hail of bullets from a bunch of colonials.

Our rifles were garbage. Our training was brief. Our supplies were low.

But we kept fighting.

Canadian troops were miserable. Many succumbed to the gas. We kept fighting.

We were outnumbered and spread out, the Germans hammered us day and night. We kept fighting.

We died by the thousands. We kept fighting.

And that is what Canadian soldiers have done since - they keep on fighting. Our freedom was secured in the blood, sweat and tears of Canadians who, over the past hundred years, refused to give up and kept on fighting.

They lie under the soil somewhere on Vimy Ridge, never to be found. Their blood has since washed off the beaches of Normandy. Their tombstones stand row by row in Korea. Their flag-draped caskets were carried down the Highway of Heroes. They walk among us, ordinary citizens who did their civic duty and answered the call to arms, and those who will in the future.

We owe them all our thanks.

In memory of six thousand Canadian lives lost during the Second Battle of Ypres and of every Canadian who sacrificed for our country since that horrific battle, our baptism by fire that occurred in the infernal meat grinder of the First World War.

Lest we forget.

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Why Switzerland, Austria, Sweden, and Finland were once Third World Countries

A common way in which economists, politicians, and political scientists tend to divide the world is by “First World” and “Third World”.  The meanings of such terms are pretty clear today, First World nations are heavily developed industrial or information based economies which are very wealthy or prosperous. Third world nations are countries that are impoverished, underdeveloped, and have very simple economies.  However, many people would founder when asked what countries belong to the “Second World”.  The reason is, the division of the world into First World, Second World, and Third World countries originally had nothing to do with economics, wealth, and prosperity, but instead was a division between ideologies and Cold War politics.

When World War II ended in 1945 two major superpowers would take the lead in world affairs; the United States and Soviet Union.  Of course, the two countries didn’t see eye to eye, the US being a democratic capitalist system and the USSR being a communist system.  It wasn’t long before a deep rivalry between the powers occurred, which would become known as the Cold War.  During the Cold War, both sides struggled to maintain technological, military, political, and economic superiority.  Space races and arms races were run, wars and proxy wars were fought, and both sides divided the world up into spheres of influence in an attempt to stay ahead of the others.  By the 1950’s two major collective defense organizations dominated Cold War politics.  NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) consisted of most North American and Western European countries which were opposed to the USSR.  In response, the Soviet Union created the Warsaw Pact, which consisted of the USSR and its satellite states in Eastern Europe.

Thus the world was essentially divided between democracy and communism.  Those nations that belonged to NATO, supported NATO, or were under NATO’s sphere of influence were termed “The First World”.  They tended to be democratic capitalist nations and included countries in North America and Western Europe, some countries in Africa and the Middle East, and then finally Japan, South Korea, and the Philippines.  The “Second World” consisted of communist countries such as the USSR, the Soviet satellites in Eastern Europe, China, Vietnam, North Korea, Cuba, and any other associated nations.  Finally, there was the rest of the world, everyone else who neutral or wasn’t aligned with either NATO or the Communist Bloc.  The Third World tended to consist of less developed and impoverished countries (at least at the time) in Africa and Latin America, but also included modern industrialized European nations such as Switzerland, Austria, Sweden, and Finland.

In 1989 communism fell in Eastern Europe and the Berlin Wall came down.  In 1991 the Soviet Union fell apart.  Thus the Cold War came to an end, but classifying nations into “First World” and “Third World”.  However, since the end of the Cold War the system started to change meaning to describe nations in terms of wealth and development.  This made sense since “First World” nations tended to be wealthy and developed while “Third World” nations tend to be poor and underdeveloped.  Of course today the “Second World” no longer has any substantive meaning, thus people tend to think the Second World is somewhere in between the First and the Third.  Since the 1970’s, the term “Fourth World” has also come about, describing either indigenous populations within a country (Native Americans or Aborigines for example) or minority ethnicities within a First World country that have Third World living standards. 

Milunka Savič

The most decorated female soldier in world military history. 

Milunka Savič is utterly amazing and literally no one knows about her, so here’s a little crash course in why she’s amazing like woah. 

She was born in a little town in Serbia and when the first Balkan war came around, she cut off her hair, disguised herself as a dude, and signed up. (Some sources claim that she pulled a Mulan and went in a family member’s place which is even cooler like woah). 

So yeah, she battled it up in the first Balkan war, and eventually the second, and World War 1. After her being injured, her commanding officer discovered her gender and offered Milunka a position as a nurse. She declined, saying that she would only accept a position with a gun. The guy tells her to come back tomorrow and he’ll have made a decision, and she says “I will wait” and stands at attention for an hour. Eventually, he not only agrees to let her stay but freaking promotes her because she’s crazy brave okay. 

She earns medal after medal, from Serbia, France, Russia, and England. She singlehandedly took two enemy trenches, hurling hand grenade after hand grenade and taking POWs. (Whoever said women can’t fight is crazy because look at MIlunka like woah). 

She’s the only Serb invited to the French president’s inauguration, and is offered a pension and apartment in Paris. She declines, so that she can go home to her country (yEAH SERBIAN NATIONALISM REPRESENT). 

After WWI, she gets married, has a kid, and adopts 3 kids orphaned by the war. (Pretty great lady, amirite). When she refused to attend a banquet honoring Belgrade’s (Serbian capitol) new German overlords, she’s sent to a concentration camp for 10 months. And guess what: she survives, and is offered a state pension because holy shit they couldn’t not take care of her after all she did for Serbia. 

She died in Belgrade at age 84, and is buried in a prestigious graveyard with full military honors. 

She’s an amazing woman in history, and she deserves to be remembered. Please share this, and remember Milunka Savič. 

Albert Ball, VC, DSO & Two Bars, MC (14 August 1896 – 7 May 1917) was an English fighter pilot during the First World War. At the time of his death he was the United Kingdom’s leading flying ace, with 44 victories, and remained its fourth-highest scorer behind Edward Mannock, James McCudden, and George McElroy. Ball joined the Sherwood Foresters at the outbreak of the First World War and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in October 1914. He transferred to the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) the following year, and gained his pilot’s wings on 26 January 1916. Joining No. 13 Squadron RFC in France, he flew reconnaissance missions before being posted in May to No. 11 Squadron, a fighter unit. From then until his return to England on leave in October, he accrued many aerial victories, earning two Distinguished Service Orders and the Military Cross. He was the first ace to become a British national hero. After a period on home establishment, Ball was posted to No. 56 Squadron, which deployed to the Western Front in April 1917. He crashed to his death in a field in France on 7 May, sparking a wave of national mourning and posthumous recognition, which included the award of the Victoria Cross for his actions during his final tour of duty. The famous German flying ace Manfred von Richthofen, remarked upon hearing of Ball’s death that he was “by far the best English flying man”. Also, he was gorgeous.