fine tipped

back to school tips from the houses

be brave like a gryffindor. sit in the front row. ask that “stupid” question. choose that bold essay prompt. befriend the new student. join that club you wanted to last year. talk to your instructor. take credit for your work. treat yourself with honor.

be hardworking like a hufflepuff. do the extra reading. rewrite those sloppy notes. go to that morning class. work on understanding that difficult concept. help others understand it, too. make your own study guides. organize your looseleaf papers. keep your planner up to date.

be curious like a ravenclaw. write down anything and everything you’ll want to google later. question why that theorem works. overlearn. ask for help. challenge the textbook sometimes. check sources. use any extra learning resources your teachers have to offer. all of your subjects are interesting if you know where to look.

be ambitious like a slytherin. go after your goals with confidence. cut out the people who question your capability. get what you deserve. don’t settle for mediocre friends. don’t settle for a mediocre education. don’t settle. believe that this will be your year.

2

Sparkly tea-lights!
All you need is a wax warmer, some plain tea-lights and glitter.

1) Slid wax out of metal base, cut wax - saving the wick and base!
2) Melt color of choice (I use leftovers from other candles)
3) Pour a thin layer - add glitter.
4) Add wick!
5) Repeat pouring and glittering process until close to top. For final layer add a bunch of glitter because glitter ✨

Additionally, charge with intent if desired.

anonymous asked:

Okay here me out Tiny Rick but the Janitor Ricks

This seems like a terrible idea… so naturally, I love it.

You were probably expecting a Tiny Ricardo weren’t you?

concept: crop top yuri but also…..shirless sleeves,

@zephyrine-gale I CAN’T STOP!!!

(uhh idk if u saw but i use a zebra super fine disposable brush pen although this one’s pretty close to dying so this is probably not an accurate judgement for what it’s supposed to look like aaa)

ART TIP: Keep a balance between digital and traditional art

because there are things traditional art will teach you that digital art won’t, and the same goes the other way

2

I’m a creature of comfort and habit. I’ve found it easy to contain my work within the confines of neat 0.8mm fine liner pen tips and 12pt serif fonts, but at this moment in time, all I want to do is create colourful mess. 

I want bright red, fast splashes and thick, messy brush strokes. I want it to be on the edge of interpretation. I want to test how far I can push it before it’s meaningless. 

Study organization- notebooks

I love stationery of all kinds, especially notebooks. And when you’re planning on studying, of course you need notebooks for taking notes and practicing! In this post, I’ll talk a little about my notebooks.


What kind(s) of notebook(s) do you use?

My personal preference is for spiral notebooks. I used to use notebooks that just opened like normal books, but they never liked to stay flat and they took up too much space on my desk. It’s funny because I used to hate spirals back when I was younger and way into drawing because the pages were more free to move against each other which led to more smudging, but I love spirals so much for note taking. They lay flat with no problem, which is the biggest thing for me. The spiral does get in the way of my hand sometimes, but it’s a minor annoyance.

I also consider the quality of the paper when buying my notebooks. It doesn’t have to be super high quality, but I just can’t deal with paper the quality of standard US looseleaf. It’s too thin and, more importantly, the surface is too rough. Paper with too rough a surface has led to the early death of too many of my pens—if you use fine-tip pens, size 0.5 or lower, and find they stop writing before the ink runs out—little bits from poor-quality paper probably got into the tip and ruined it. The paper I like the most feels a little bit weighty and nice and smooth!

Hardcover or softcover is also a choice to make! I use both, types:

Left to right- hardcover lined notebook, softcover lined notebook, softcover 원고지 squared paper notebook


How many notebooks do you use?

I have three main types of notebooks! I’ll go over each type:

Grammar notebooks

My grammar notebooks are all hardcover. I use them to collect grammar explanations and other important notes. I write them as cleanly as possible and even use my many colorful highlighters to make them look a little nicer. If I need to know about a grammar point that I have already learned, I open my grammar notebook for the right language and find it. This way, I don’t have to remember which textbook or source I saw a certain grammar point or explanation in—if it’s important, I write it down in my grammar notebook! So, my grammar notebooks are mashups of multiple texts and sources. These are for reference only; I don’t do any practice or extra writing in them. Nothing but the facts!


Practice notebooks

My practice notebook is where I write down definitions of new words I learned, practice sentences for my vocab flashcard words, breakdowns of articles I’ve studied on my Chinese reader apps… I guess calling it a “practice notebook” makes its purpose pretty self-explanatory. It’s nothing special; I write quickly and messily in it, and when it gets full, I can just throw it in the recycling bin and start a fresh one. My practice notebook is a softcover spiral.


Chinese article notebook

Korean squared paper—or I guess any squared paper—is wonderful for writing Chinese characters. Once I’ve encountered an article in a Chinese reader app and broken it down in my practice notebook, I rewrite it cleanly in my article notebook so I can easily find and read it again later.


I don’t always have all of my notebook types with me. If I plan on studying grammar, I will bring the correct grammar notebook along, and if I plan on studying Chinese articles, I might have my article notebook with me, but not always. However, my practice notebook is always in my bag!

How do you organize your notes and all? For those of you who might be struggling to get your notes together, I hope this helped!

Happy studying~

daiso highlighters review! firstly, these daiso highlighters are very comparable with the zebra mildliner. as you can tell all the colours available are also offered in the mildliner color range. unlike the mildliner, these highlighters are only one-sided, it doesn’t have the fine tip that the mildliner has. i’ve not tried them a lot yet so i’m not sure how well the ink dries up. they do not ghost or bleed through paper and i use muji’s loose leaf paper. the major difference is the price, these highlighters are from daiso so it’s $2 for a pack of 5 while mildliner costs $1.95 each. if you’re looking for an alternative of mildliner definitely check them out, 10/10 recommend. (there are a total of two packs in this picture the first 5 and the last 5 respectively)

ask-jack-eevee  asked:

I'm interested in trying to make a similar seamless image like the dragon one you did. Have you ever done a tutorial on how to do that? If not would you be willing to? Even a few small tips is fine.

I’ve always wanted to make a tutorial! So here’s some semi-coherent ramblings, feel free to ask more questions of any of it doesn’t make sense!

Hope this helps!

23 June 2017 || 

Hi!

Over the last few semesters, I developed my own system of revising for exams. I’m a visual learner and writing things down in an organised way helps me loads. I posted pictures of my exam notes several times before (here, here, here, here) and I use this format for basically every class that requires an exam instead of an essay - so far: calculus 1, real analysis, maths education, english literature, and teaching german as a second language. Many people really liked this format, so here’s a step-by-step guide on how I do it! 

1. Supplies

I use:

  • blank A4 paper
  • one sheet of A4 grid paper 
  • a black gel pen by Kyocera (you can use any pen, but it should have a somewhat fine tip and should dry easily)
  • Stabilo fine liners point88 (one or two matching colours per class)
  •  a set square (imo that works better than a ruler)
  • a Faber-Castell 0.7 Grip 1347 pencil in 2B (you can use any pencil you like, but it should be HB or 2B because you need to erase it later)
  • lecture notes/slides, class notes, homework, basically any info that is necessary for the exam

2. Setup

  1. Place the grid paper underneath the blank one. Make sure it doesn’t move when you write (if necessary, use paperclips to hold it in place). 
  2. Draw margins and aid lines (in pencil - you’ll erase these later). Measure them out so they’ll be the same on every sheet. I usually do approximately 1cm margins left, right, and bottom, 2.5cm margin at the top for title and subheading, and three columns: left one with a width of 6cm, middle one with 5cm, right one with 6cm and 0.5cm blank space between them. (The grid paper underneath will help.) You can also only make two columns - four columns is gonna be very hard though because that won’t leave you with much space. 
  3. Every time you have a list, bullet points, step-by-step guides etc, indent the bullets by another 0.5cm (draw another aid line for this). If you have sub-bullets, indent them another 0.5cm and so on. 
  4. I use colours for bullet points (the actual points /arrows /numbers/ whatever), important names, something that I’m defining, subheadings, and important dates. 

3. Content

  1. Start writing your notes. Make them as condensed as you possibly can without leaving important points out. I try to go for one A4 page per lecture (aka around 28 powerpoint slides or more on one page), but sometimes I’ll also end up with two.
  2. Use abbreviations for words you use a lot, e.g. “+” for “and”, “p.” for “problem”, “str.” for “strategies”, “lit.” for “literature” etc. 
  3. You can absolutely include important diagrams/graphs etc. Either print them out in the size you need or draw them by hand and in the colours you need. If it doesn’t fit in one column, spread it out over two columns and continue the separated columns underneath/above. 
  4. Make your bullet points mean something. Use numbers, arrows, flags, lowercase letters, uppercase letters, dots - each can have a different meaning. Are you writing something where the order is important       (numbers)? Are you giving examples (dots)? Are you mentioning separate important key points (flags)? 
  5. I wrote my last summary page for maths education today and stopped the time - I needed 50 minutes for one lecture with 27 slides (new material because I hadn’t been there), including a small chocolate break. 

4. Final Touches

  • Check if the ink has dried. Check again. 
  • Carefully erase the pencil aid lines with a good eraser. make sure you don’t wrinkle the paper (unless you don’t care about that sort of stuff haha)
  • If you want to, you can highlight key words (or whatever you like). 
  • Number your pages if you’ll write several. I always write down the number of the lecture (session 1, session 2 etc) in the subheading. 
  • Optional, but I do it: Make a copy of your sheet that you carry around with you. Nothing is as frustrating as spilling coffee over your revision sheets. Put the original in a plastic sleeve and keep it in a folder or binder somewhere, and study/revise only with the copy. Especially useful if you have others quizzing you with your summaries and they don’t care if they rip/wrinkle/ruin them lmao 

I hope this was somewhat informative! You can tweak it of course, depending on what class you have and what will be on the exam. I hope you’re having a nice weekend! :) 

2

Hi, guys! I recently received an ask from @sunny-bunnies about my handwriting and headers! I thought my headers were more interesting (I’ll probably do a handwriting tag eventually haha), and I have a lot that I use so this post would get way long if I did both :)

Anyway, I’m going to go through all of the headers that I use regularly! they’re pictured above with and without shadows as a tl;dr.

monoline: this style is pretty popular right now and is also my current favorite! basically, it’s cursive, but uneven- whenever a letter ends in a downstroke, I extend it a little below where it would usually be and also vary the line on which the letters “sit.” The most important tip for this style is to keep stroke width and letter size the same, so that the unevenness looks intentional and not sloppy.

lowercase: I like to use this one as a subheading! it looks much better in the shadow version but basically you write in lowercase print as neatly as you can and hope for the best.

uppercase: This one can be used virtually anywhere! It’s pretty much writing in all caps; I prefer to stretch it vertically! (If you do this, make sure your letters are vertically centered in the same place! ex. the middle line on the E can go high, low, or in the middle, but it should also match where the bump of a P ends.)

faux calligraphy: (forgive me running out of space on this one oops) sort of like monoline (you can do the cursive evenly, like above, or unevenly), but after you write, go back in and thicken the downstrokes. This is much easier than regular calligraphy if you a. don’t feel confident with your calligraphy or b. don’t own brush pens!

serif 1: this one’s cute and kinda typewriter-ish! just print your letters and add serifs (little mini dashes) to the ends of lines. boom! you’re done. I like to look up a typewriter font to have a reference for the serif length and placement, but tbh it looks pretty good even if you wing it.

serif 2: serif 1 but adding to vertical strokes (note that these are not the same as the downstrokes used in faux calligraphy!) I based this style off of times new roman if you need a reference. A warning about serifs: shadows are a pain to do so if you choose to do a shadow + serif, make sure your header is 10 or fewer letters (you’ll thank me later.)

two-tone: take your faux calligraphy (this works better if you have thicker strokes), draw an imaginary line down the middle, and use a darker color to color over the top or bottom (I favor the bottom but it’s a matter of personal preference!) Layering colors (as opposed to just making each half the letter one color) has 2 benefits: 1. no guesswork in trying to match up halves, and 2. the colors look more cohesive! You can also try to blend the colors together to make a gradient (lay down more of the darker color and blend it upward with the lighter one!)

big & small: uppercase, but instead of adding shadows, add mini cursive letters to the centers of the colored letters. Make sure to connect it all together!

highlighted caps: A classic and perfect if you’re in a rush or doing subheaders. just write in all caps and highlight over it. voilá!

color shadow: I would definitely recommend doing this in a larger space than the one I left myself (check out this post to see it done less sloppily) but the idea is to do faux calligraphy with the black pen and the shadow with your colored pen or highlighter! (here I would generally recommend a gel pen or felt, fine-tipped marker but obviously I didn’t follow either of my own tips so make of that what you will)

a note on shadows: So I’ve mentioned shadows a couple times. Unless you want to make your life hard, do the shadows after the main body of the letter. There are just 3 basic rules I follow here! 1. pick 2 adjacent directions to do the shadows in (above, I picked down and right but you can also pick down and left or, if you’re feeling creative, up and left or right.) 2. For every line, one side should be in shadow. this isn’t a hard-and-fast rule but it’s pretty good to follow in general. 3. Choose a primary and secondary direction! For example, I picked down and right, correct? But if I have a capital A (see “uppercase”) I need to pick between a down/left shadow and an up/right shadow. Since I picked right as my primary direction, I choose the up/right side! This is basically an extension of rule 2 but it took me a while to figure out so I thought it should be included.

Sorry! this post went a lot longer than I had intended, but hopefully it was informative! P.S. if you like my posts, maybe you’d also like my new studygram!

terra-terrible  asked:

What methods do you use to make your art look so animated anyway? :0 It seriously looks great!!

Well there’s the obvious, of course. Line of Action, all that

use of weight and gravity to energize a pose, that helps show that it’s mid-motion

utilizing angles for just a lil’ extra spice

but also, there’s a sort of mentality. 

In drawings, you’ll have to get a little creative with animated expression. After all,

Keep reading

Witch tip 🕯🕯

If you don’t have a candle with the colour you need you can use a white candle + a candle holder with a shade that match your intent! It’s also inexpensive becouse you can DIY painting some glasses or empty jars.

HOE LESSON #2

If you wear make-up, if you don’t wear make up, You have to take care of your brows and lashes!! And mama her is gonna give you some advice.
1. IF YOU WANT LENGTH:
• use coconut oil and apply with either a liner or a clean mascara brush. Aim for the roots!! That’s where they grow.
• vaseline helps protect your strands preventing them from falling off therefor giving you longer lashes, bonus tip: if you don’t feel like mascara or your eyebrows being a bitch just rub some vasaline!!! You won’t look greasy, more like shiny.
•Vitamin E!! Get those vitamin E pills and pop em or buy em at the store. You can’t go wrong. Apply them like you do mascara.
2. FOR THICKENING.
• okay so you’ve got length but you only got 4 strands. USE CASTOR OIL. It stimulates hair growth, obviously resulting in more hair. Do this in all the sparse parts on your eyebrows. Do it on your eyelashes. But careful not to get it in your eye, no bueno.

•Get some eyelash serums if you’ve got the money Drink your water, get your vitamins!!

• Stimulate your hair growth!! Every night use a clean mascara brush to stimulate the growth. It just gets the cells moving.
THE ULTIMATE MIXTURE.
Just guess the measurements like me.
You’ll need:
Coconut oil
Vaseline
Vitamin E
Castor oil
Clean mascara tube with brush (opt)
Q tips (opt)
Just mix this shit all together and pour it into a mascara tube. At night (pref) put it on your lashes with the brush, add a couple layers avoid contact w/ eye. Put this on your brows and be amazed. If you don’t have a mascara tube a small container and q tips will do just fine.
Random tips:
1.Try not to wear mascara for a couple of days to let em breath.
2.Use coconut oil or vaseline to remove make up (try oils that won’t break you out)
3. Try soaking a cotton pad with make up remover/oil leave on eye for a little but to dissolve make up.
TEST TO SEE IF YOU ARE ALLERGIC BEFORE TRYING. DO NOT PUT IN EYES.

Long eyelashes and thick eyebrows are all I could ever hope for and I hope you achieve it because you are a holy godess

check out @hoeguide for more stuff!!