finding-a-job

anonymous asked:

Hi there I have an interview tomorrow and I'm not sure what is good for me to wear?

Job Interview Outfits 

There are three rules to picking the perfect interview outfit:

  1. Simple + classic. You’re looking to wear a simple outfit (this means no crazy patterns or lots of colors) that you can highlight with an ascot or small piece of jewelry. You do not want your outfit to upstage your interview! 
  2. Business casual. Potential employers will be put off if you don’t dress up for your interview. You do not want to walk in wearing jeans and a t-shirt under any circumstance. They are taking the time out of their day to meet with you, and they may see everyday clothes as a sign of unprofessionalism.
  3. The most important rule- wear something you feel comfortable in. You do not want to be shifting around uncomfortably in front of your potential employer. Job interviews are stressful enough, you don’t the added anxiety of a wedgie or heels you can’t walk in.

Some interviewers are ageist, especially if you’re someone who does not have an extensive resume. In this case you will want to appear older. Here are some simple steps that you can take to appear older:

  • Wearing a tie
  • Wearing heavy eye makeup
  • Putting your hair up in a bun
  • Similarly, slicking your hair back
  • Growing a beard or facial hair of some sort
  • Glasses if you wear them (as opposed to contacts)
  • Darker colors: black, grey, brown

Good luck!

10 Things They Don’t Tell You about Finding Your First Teaching Position

Congratulations on graduating you teacher/educator! Wrapping up your student teaching and walking across that stage is a validation of four long years of work. Now all that’s left is to find your first teaching job.

1.) You will not have a job in May. Breathe.

Especially if you’re not math, science, or SPED expect not to have a job in May. This can be an incredibly scary and daunting position to be headed towards, but it is also completely normal. Schools do not even start thinking about the next school year until late June/early July. This isn’t to say you shouldn’t even start your search until then, but don’t panic until August 1st. Perhaps you’re a self-driven “go-getter” who just knows in your heart you’re going to be one of the few with a job. That’s great, be determined, but know that the system you’re headed towards does not really reward go-getters, and often you’ll feel like you’re constantly speeding up to a red light. The people who are graduating with a job are either: student teaching at a school that has an opening, their CT is head of the department, or they return to the high school they themselves attended. There is nothing wrong with using connections, but if you’re not in the one of the above three categories, it is a tough process to get your foot in the door. Thousands of teachers just like you go through this process every year. Breathe, and you will be fine.

2.) There will be peaks and valleys

There will be days that you are nailing it; there will be days where you are wallowing in self-pity on the carpet blubbering about how you’re un-hirable (and maybe un-lovable) and should crawl under a rock and die. As with any job search, the journey is a long one and is filled with peaks and valleys. This is something that your education prep courses notoriously under-prepared you for. To start with, they do not give you a real scope of just how much time the search itself is going to take you and the courses, (no matter how many resume building classes you attend) can’t prepare you for how personal it feels when you never get a call back, or a reply email. The valleys are so long and so deep and the peaks are so short that you may accidentally trip over one on the way to another valley. You present the best version of yourself for so long and seem to still face rejection at every corner. There will be days where you get that email or a principal will leave a voicemail and you will feel as if you have vanquished a monster every time. Those are glorious times in the kingdom. Know this: it is not personal, there is nothing wrong with you, keep up the good fight.

3.) Take Sundays for you

Obviously being determined is important and you want to start early and have your application materials (resume, letters of rec…etc) as soon as you can get them together. However, nothing ever gets accomplished on a Sunday. It’s rare for any principals to be in their office, district offices certainly aren’t open, and everything shuts down on a Sunday. In the mad, stressful search that is finding your first teaching position, take Sundays for you. Go to the movies, hang out with friends, go swimming. Whatever the case may be you will never get anything accomplished on a Sunday, so you might as well take the day to unwind and enjoy what little of a summer you have. A lot of your search is going to be about balance and not stressing yourself out into a panic. Taking one day a week is a very manageable way to organize your time and make sure you’re not going to get burned out too early.

4.) Everyone’s a critic

Teaching is a unique profession in the sense that everyone around you, teachers or not, will think they know how to do it and will give you advice on your job search. Random people will ask “well, did you call any principals yet?” and you’re supposed to act shocked at this revelation that is going to single-handedly turn your career around. Your friends and family will mean well, which it makes it very difficult to get upset with them when they turn to you in May wondering why you haven’t found work. You have done your research; you know when districts start hiring or when they have career fairs…etc, just hold your head up high. It’s difficult when you feel you’re doing every little thing you can to find a job and your family and friends are breathing down your neck and offering patronizing advice like “make sure you have extra copies of your resume.” Extra copies? WHAT? Slow down, let me get a pen, I want to get all of this written down! The best advice is to smile and nod and don’t let their ignorance of our profession get under your skin.

 5.) Learn to love the hoops

Contrary to what movies (and your family) will tell you, teaching is not a one “30-minute-interview-handshake” sort of thing anymore (see #2). A very plausible scenario: you to attend a career fair and give a 5-minute meet and greet, to which they will schedule another follow-up interview (usually lasting about 30-40 minutes) after that interview you would make it to the second round, which is a 20 minute teaching demonstration lesson, followed by an hour-long debrief on your lesson’s strengths and weaknesses. Finally they’d narrow it down to two candidates, and you would have to interview an additional time for the position, then wait a week and a half while the principal/admin team makes their decision for which you have a 50/50 shot at. That is roughly 4-5 hoops to jump through. Urban districts, rural districts, and every district in between have a lengthy screening process that, (unless you’re in one of the three categories mentioned in #1) will take some time to complete. There is no way around this process, and the only way to win the game is to play it. You will have to love the process, because if you don’t life will become a meaningless abyss and you’ll end up like one of those teaching majors who take some desk job somewhere and convince themselves they’re happier not being in a classroom. Stick with it! It is what everyone else is doing and you will make it out alive.

6.) There aren’t always right answers

So congrats, you landed the interview! That is a feat in and of itself because principals and assistant principals have to sort through so many different resumes and qualified applications that making the cut that first time is a success. When looking for your first teaching job out of college, it is hard to get out of that “right/wrong, black/white, yes/no” mentality. In your education classes there were right or wrong answers. However, in interviews with principals (especially the earlier ones) they are just looking for how you think or how you shape your ideas/philosophy over time. Answer the questions as succinctly and honestly as you can. Sometimes they may ask a question you know nothing about, such as a specific theory or score-reporting software. In these cases, just admit you’re unfamiliar with whatever concept they are asking you about, but are willing to do some independent research. Hundreds of applicants will be b.s.-ing answers all day to their faces, and most principals will thank you for your honesty. Get out of that “right/wrong” dichotomy because it’s going to put a lot more stress on you when speaking with the principal. There is, of course, the possibility that whomever is interviewing you will hate all your answers, and that’s fine (see #7) that just means it’s somewhere you don’t want to be, or wouldn’t “gel” well with the rest of the staff.

7.) Go to every interview

This sounds like common sense, and the angry skeptic might read this point as “oh yeah, let me turn down all the NOTHING I’m getting offered.” Hold tight. After working your way through May and June and maybe even early July you will finally start to get some traction. Schools will start calling you back slowly, but surely. Think of it as the first snowflake of an avalanche, or the first drop in a rainstorm, or whatever various “more will come” metaphor you’d prefer. You start to hack your way through the jungle of hoops and a few schools tell you you’re being “highly considered” or “you’re the favorite candidate for this position.” That is great news! However, be wary of ever assuming you’ve got a job in the bag. There may be a point where you’re so sure one school wants to hire you, and then you’ll get another call. Go to that interview. Until your signature is ink on paper, keep jumping through the hoops. Sometimes the best school will contact you later in the year and might be the best thing for you. The universe is a random and chaotic thing, so keep as many options open as possible and be careful about shutting doors too quickly.  

8.) Don’t kid yourself on where you want to be

In line with #6, be honest about what kind of environment, and what kind of student body you want to teach. Some of your peers will opt for the more rural areas where you have to drive 30 minutes to get to a Wal-Mart; the class sizes are smaller and the kids have a lot of parental involvement. However, some of your peers will opt for more urban areas, some of your peers will opt for a suburb area or a private school; they all have pros and cons. At any rate, make sure you know what kind of area you want to be in, and make those a top priority in your search for a job. Spending a year in an environment you hate will drive you nuts and, frankly, it will rub off on your students and will be a bad situation all around. When you feel like you’re drowning, you might be quick to accept “any port in a storm,” and this is entirely natural. However, fight this urge. Your students will sense it, your administration will sense it, and that’s bad news. You may be waiting a bit longer, and other jobs might pass you up in the meantime, but it is better to wait for a position you could really see yourself in rather than taking the first offer that comes along.

 9.) Your resume will never matter as much as your personality

Over the years you may have added many fellow education majors to Facebook (through classes, for projects, whatever.) You will have seen these peers teach in classes, and through four years you’ll have a rough idea of how these men and women are in a classroom. These peers will forget to turn on projectors, refuse to accept any criticisms of their lesson plans, or speak so softly they couldn’t command an army of ants let alone a classroom. Every other day you will see someone post a status announcing their new position of gainful employment. Some of these people you will remark “oh, good for them!” and for others your jaw will drop in disbelief that some district out there in the world gave that person a job. It’s rude, it’s petty, but you will think it. Bottom line: be prepared to see bad teachers get jobs before you. That’s because they met with a principal who, more than likely, just felt like that applicant would be a “good fit” for their building. Often they are correct. Your resume is incredibly important to getting your foot in the door, but at the end of the day that personality has to shine through because that is what’s going to clinch you the job.

10.) We are all on the same ship

There are some who believe that finding your first teaching job is a zero-sum game. (Your loss is their win.) These people will commonly say things like “I’m not sharing any of my resources!” or “Why would I tell people about openings I know about? Then someone else could get them!” Do not, under any circumstances, choose to be one of those people. Teaching is a profession built on collaboration and the people who respond to the stress of searching for a job by lashing out and treating everyone like the enemy make this process practically unbearable. Sometimes a friend will get a call from an urban school, and she’ll pass your name along to them instead because she’d prefer something more rural. Sometimes it is just that easy. We, as educators, have enough to deal with trying to find that first job without worrying about our peers stabbing us in the back.  We are all passengers on the same ship just trying to get into classrooms to inspire and foster students. Rest assured you will get into a classroom, and all the effort will be worth it. Once you finally secure that job, do you really want to turn around and see that no one’s behind you because you were more interested in stepping on necks than helping people out?

One day your grandkids will ask “what was the best day of your life?” and having kids and grandkids and winning the lottery and solving the world’s problems will pale in comparison to the day a principal calls you to offer you the position. That moment is coming; be prepared and try to relax.

anonymous asked:

Hiii do you know anything I can do to attract a job? I've been applying like crazy but it's a year now and I'm using all the help I could get! Thank you x

Great question and I would be happy to help.  A bunch of my friends joke around about me being able to find jobs in a snap.  It is one of my “magic” powers.  

Before we get to any magic, might I advise a couple of different routes you may not be considering?  I always like to take a real world approach before handing out any spells.  I am not an old lady by any means, but I have learned a thing or two, and I think I might be able to help.  (Whether you like this type of advice is entirely up to you, but take it from me: the job market can be tough to navigate and sometimes it helps hearing this kind of advice from someone who has been down that road.)

Originally posted by tinaillustration

1.  Have you recently updated/revised your resume and cover letter?  Seriously, sometimes people do not hire you based on the content in your cover letter.  The wording could be off-putting, it could be too long (or too short), it could be not informative enough.  Cultivating your cover letter and resume is like crafting a spell; it needs to be worded correctly, express who you are as an employee in a concise manner, and make you seem as hireable as possible.  (You could also put a sigil on your cover letter and resume without anyone ever knowing using invisible ink or printing in white.) . A great website for formatting your cover letter and resume to make it look like THE BOMB DOT COM is CVMKR.

2.  Have you applied for every available job, including the ones that you may think you are “above”?  Listen, I have a BFA in Photographic Imagery; I didn’t exactly choose the most profitable and available field in the world.  I loved every bit of time I spent in college learning about art (and other various topics) and I am incredibly proud of what I accomplished.  I am still very passionate about my work, but the fact of the matter is that dream jobs are incredibly hard to come by.  There were plenty of times I had to suck up my pride and apply at places I thought I was too good for.  That includes fast food chains and restaurants, data entry, and even sales positions for companies I knew were absolute bullshit (the sales companies, not everything else.)  It took me years of gaining experience, freelancing, working for next to absolutely nothing, and busting my ass to get to where I am today.  So, if you haven’t gone down to McDonald’s or Walmart, you might want to lace up your boots and get to walking.  Money is money anyway you slice it, even if it means working at a place you aren’t necessarily are proud of.  I know that seems like tough love, but it is true.

My dad once told me, “You only get out of life what you put into it.”  I put in hours upon hours of literal blood, sweat, and tears, sleepless nights, going hungry and almost being homeless, paying thousands upon thousands of dollars back to student loans, and I have only JUST gotten what I would consider to be a dream job.  I believed in what I was doing every day.  I got up even when I didn’t want to.  You just have to keep trying, even when things seem grim.

3.  There are quite a few spells involving careers and money.  I am going to refer you to @urbanspellcraft and @flowing-to-the-ocean’s spells.  I trust their work to help you along the way, but just know that magic can only take you so far.  In the amount of time you would spend working during an average work day (8+ hours), you need searching and applying for jobs, calling employers for interviews, and going to temp agencies.  If not, you won’t find a job.  Take it from me, as someone who spent the better part of a decade struggling to find a career and finally–FINALLY–got her dream job.  You can do it, you just have to try.

* Spell to Get the Job You Want
* Spell for Job Seekers

helpful tips if you’re looking for a new job
  • figure out your “calling” by considering 3 things: gifts (what you’re good at), passions (what makes you happy), and values (your beliefs).
  • make a column for each of those 3 categories and start brainstorming.
  • what are your strongest talents? what tasks do you find most fun?
  • pay attention to any themes or common activities that bridge the columns
  • remember to think about your weaknesses, too, without being too hard on yourself.
  • don’t underestimate the value of “passive” job hunting: volunteering, attending meet-ups, or taking on a side-project are all great ways to meet new people and prospective employers
  • get a feel for what activities really make you tick.
  • figure out what parts of your current sh*tty job you don’t mind
  • identifying just a few tasks at which you’ll excel will help you find a way to get noticed by future employers.
  • avoid the proverbial “spray and pray” with your resume
  • “dear hiring manager” on a cover letter is a giveaway you’re applying everywhere
  • if you can’t find the actual name of the hiring manager for the position you want, find someone with a similar title
  • politely conversational cover letters often read better than a formal recitation of your accomplishments
  • be mindful of your social media. a large majority of hiring managers cop to actively checking out prospective employees’ online presence.
  • leveraging social media is also as much about doing the right things as it is about deleting that old picture of you suckling a beer bong.
  • set up google alerts for any companies you’re interested in, and not being shy about reaching out to employees directly.
  • embrace the shmooze and send messages to the most inspiring people you meet and read about online
  • if all else fails, talk to someone with an unbiased opinion

anonymous asked:

Hello! Im scared of getting a job because I feel like I'd mess up and embarrass myself. I understand that I should just do it, but i'm scared. /:

No need to feel embarrassed! The job hunt is stressful for everyone, that’s why we have written a TON of blogs about it. I’m not sure if you mean working/resume building while you’re in school or after you graduate, so I’ll give you some resources for both! :)

Interviewing/Resumes:

Working While in School:

The Post-Grad Job Hunt:

Saving Money:

This help you get started on preparing. Don’t be scared, you got this!

anonymous asked:

Do you have any tips for people around high school age looking for jobs 15-18? Would be very helpful, thanks!

Before you do anything:

First impressions are one of your most powerful assets as a job hunter! No matter your age, your ability to carry yourself and to speak confidently will be admired. Unfortunately, the 15-18 age range is notorious for not being “adult” enough, so it’s very important that you work to set yourself apart.

1. Phone calls: Get comfortable talking to strangers on the phone ASAP. I’ve worked in customer service for eight years (four of which were spent in a call center), a good phone voice can make all the difference. Most potential employers do not respond well to “like” and “um”, many won’t even meet with you if you have “young” phone voice.

2. Correspondence: There’s a lot of correspondence that happens before an actual job interview takes place. Be prompt and courteous in all your correspondence, and always check your emails/texts for grammatical or spelling errors before you send them.

3. Looking older: Is there something quick you can do to make yourself look older? Maybe putting your hair up in a bun, growing a mustache, wearing glasses, etc. If you have a very young looking face like me, wear obvious make up.

4. References: Accumulate an impressive list of professional references. Potential employers always ask for references, but I’ve had several employers only call one of my references. Here are some people who you can ask to be your reference:

  • Your old teacher
  • Your old guidance counselor
  • Your old co-worker
  • An old camp counselor
  • Someone who trained you at a job
  • A family friend who owns a respectable business

5. Arrive early: Arrive significantly early for your interview. I recommend arriving a half hour before your interview, because it will set a nice precedent for your timeliness. If there is a receptionist or people working in the area that you are waiting, be chatty and ask them questions about the job. Offices are gossipy, so the more favorable impressions you make- the better!

6. Follow up: After your interview, wait several hours and send a nice email thanking your potential employer for the opportunity to meet with them. If you don’t hear from them within a week of your interview, reach out with an email asking if there’s anything else they need from you. If you don’t get the job, be courteous in your response to them and say something like “Thank you for the opportunity, I hope you’ll consider me in the future”. If you do that, they will consider you in the future!

I NEED FINANCIAL HELP WHILE LOOKING FOR A JOB

Hey everyone, here’s the situation:

I thought I had a job lined up for me when I got out of school, and it was the same position that I had last summer. However, this wasn’t the case anymore BECAUSE they aren’t hiring anyone, and have no plans to open any positions anytime soon, which sucks for me, because I was promised a position after I left that job last year to pursue my 4th and final year in University.

It’s going to be hard trying to find a job in my area because I have lots of experience and qualifications as a manager, and unfortunately, there’s absolutely no positions open for that anywhere, and that’s not the position I’m looking for because there’s too much stress and time consuming work involved in being a manager, BUT THANKS TO THAT, many institutions won’t hire me to just be a clerk or a cashier, because I’m:

“OVER-QUALIFIED” – the stupidest word in the employment business.

It’s now May, I have rent and bills that need to be paid this month, and I still haven’t found a job yet thanks to the mix up I mentioned above, so I need help finding the funds while searching for someplace to work in the meantime.

This is a Donation Drive callout. If anyone reading this wants to help out, even if it’s just a dollar, please donate to my paypal address here:

ecsd@shaw.ca

ecsd@shaw.ca

ecsd@shaw.ca

The total amount that I’ll need for the end of the month: Approx. $2000.00

All proceeds will go towards: Rent, Phone bills (this month’s and next month’s), Health Insurance, groceries, emergency funds, and bus pass (min. $100). Hopefully there will be some left over for next month’s bills in case I can’t find a job by then.

I still make peanuts on YouTube, I’m not Full-Time there yet and I probably won’t be for a few more years. I’ll work on getting a Patreon page up for all of you if that helps, but I know right now, I need the help.

With donating, I’ll repay by doing the best I can with my YouTube channel and find the job I need that will cover all of the outstanding fees I need paid off.

TL;DR - My last job screwed me over for a guaranteed position, I’m unemployed, apparently “Over-Qualified” for anything less then a Manager’s position that would be unhealthy for me, looking for work and need help with finances. Even $1 will help if you can spare it, or reblog this for others to see.

Thank you,

C.R.~<3

inthesilverymoonlight  asked:

So I'm trying to get my first job, and beyond having a stellar resume and cover letter, what can I do to up my chances of getting a follow up interview?

Great question! Here’s some general advice… if you have any specific questions please let me know and I’ll address them!

Resume + Cover Letter

1. Creating a resume. The first step to setting out on a job search is creating the perfect resume! Try to limit your resume to one page that is packed with well worded information about all you have to offer. You may want to create several different resumes that highlight your different skills. For example, I have an IT resume, a teaching resume, and a general resume. Here is a pretty thorough article on creating a resume.

2. Buff up your resume. Now that you’ve created your resume, go over it and exaggerate the fuck out of everything. Nobody is going to stick their neck out for you or going to talk you up. You need to be your own cheerleader. You need to create the most impressive version of yourself on paper as possible. Check it.

3. Keep it clean. First impressions matter! Your resume is going to be your potential employer’s first impression of you. You want that impression to be of someone who is organized, intelligent, and talented. Don’t clutter your resume or make it overly complicated.

4. Cover letter. Not all entry level jobs will require or even ask for a cover letter, but it’s good to have one prepared on the off chance that they do. Think of your cover letter as a teaser to your resume. You don’t want to reiterate it word for word, but you want to spark your potential employer’s interest. Check out this post on constructing the perfect cover letter. Remember- keep it brief, intelligent, and tantalizing.

The Interview

1. Work on your interviewing skills. Your resume will get you through the door, but your personality is what will eventually win you a job. Extroverts have an easier time turning on the charm, but introverts may have to work harder to gain the same ease of conversation. I would recommend seeing some amateur theater or live music performances in your community. Go to a high school musical, see the college Drama Club’s new play. You want the chance to see different levels of confidence in people. Just by watching the performers you’ll be able to easily see who is comfortable being the center of attention and who is not. Let the mistakes or triumphs you see on stage influence the movements, eye contact, and tone of voice that you will use when addressing potential employers. Also, if you don’t want to actually go out, there are loads of community theater youtube videos.

2. Practice makes perfect. Come up with a list of questions that an employer might ask you, and ready your answers confidently. Have a friend “interview” you and have them rate you based on how you respond. If your friend is too positive about your performance, get another one to interview you. You want honesty, you want critiques! If you have no friends or relatives who are able to help you, record yourself answering questions using a webcam. Luckily, there are lots of posts about job interviews on the internet. This is a good one.

3. Talk yourself up. In the interview, you never want to even imply that there is an aspect of the job that you can’t handle. You don’t want to outright lie, but exaggerate your skill levels knowing that once you get in the door, you’ll be competent enough. Never say “I don’t know that skill” say “I’ve heard a lot about that skill, and I’m interested to learn more”. 

4. Ask questions. After the interviewer has asked you all their questions about the prospective job, make sure to ask them several questions in return. The more, the better. Really, truly, honestly. Ask them so many goddamn questions that they feel like they’re being interviewed! These questions should be as specific as possible and should show your interest in the company. Tie in any tidbits of information that you picked up on during your interview, and reiterate important points. Remember, people love talking about their jobs. Use this to your advantage. Get your interviewer talking about the different aspects of what they like and dislike. 

5. Follow up. Send a “thank you” email to your prospective employer directly after meeting them. Thank them for taking the time to meet with you, and let them know that you look forward to hearing from them soon. This will show that you have initiative and follow through. Employers love that shit.

Feel free to message me directly about any of this information! I literally got an incredible job by beefing up my resume and talking myself up.

Additional Resources

General Job Advice

How to Include Dungeons & Dragons on Your Resume

How to Write A Cover Letter 

How to Write A Cover Letter 2

How to Write A Resume (Like A Boss)

Job Hunting Support

Professional Email Address (For Resumes)

Resume Tips

Strong Words to Use on A Resume

Talk Yourself Up!

Tips for Teenagers

Good Catch

Good Catch
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With so many people from around the world talking about there experiences in school, it can be a little confusing to figure out what it all means. All states have different standards so things can vary a lot, but here’s a general guide to help you figure out what the heck your American friends are talking about.

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I sincerely apologize for this.

wake me the fuck up when i’m living in my clean, nicely decorated apartment in Washington state with my husband and i just got done working at my editing job and i’m curled up with a book while he keeps interrupting me as he works on his masters degree assignments and we talk about going hiking that weekend to take some photos and we idly comment on how different our lives are now, but everything’s still good