finding-a-job

anonymous asked:

could i get some specific advice on how to get a part time job? long story short, ive had to raise my siblings since i was 10 in place of our mom due to her working all the time, so ive never joined any clubs or sports teams. Our family also recently moved cities so that i can go to college. a lot of the advice for teens (list extracurriculars and awards on resumes, ect) doesnt apply to me. im essentially starting late and from scratch. mostly im looking for ways to gain references i guess?

Check out our Job Hunting Masterpost.

In terms of gaining references, here are some ideas:

- A teacher whose class you did well in.

- A guidance counselor or school executive who you’ve worked with.

- An “Adult” in charge of a club you’ve been a part of (not sure if this applies to you).

- A friend of a friend who is an Adult and is willing to vouch for you.

- Anyone you’ve volunteered with or for in the past who can vouch for your work-ethic.

Remember that you have to ask people if they’re okay with being your reference before using them. But I’ve never had anyone turn me down, most people are honored to be considered.

Also: Jobs - Making a Resume With No Work Experience

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Trap Gangie (FREE DL) - SoundCloud

Hey if anyone likes my mix and would like to help me, I am a broke mentally ill twoc in a weird fucked up situation where I have to very suddenly move out of my parents’ house within the next two weeks. This is terrifying to me for several reasons. My mental health issues make it extremely challenging to work a full time job to support myself. I have been trying hard to find a part time job within my abilities but no one seems to want to hire me. I’ve had at least one potential job ice me out because im a trans woman. I’ve also been trying to sell my dirty panties online but thats going nowhere. Basically if anyone wants to donate to my Paypal or Google Wallet (both blahhearts@gmail.com ) to help me buy food and medication while i move and keep looking for work I would DEEPLY appreciate it. Any amount would help me enormously. I’m really scared and lost and stressed out and i just rlly need help. :(

10 Things They Don’t Tell You about Finding Your First Teaching Position

Congratulations on graduating you teacher/educator! Wrapping up your student teaching and walking across that stage is a validation of four long years of work. Now all that’s left is to find your first teaching job.

1.) You will not have a job in May. Breathe.

Especially if you’re not math, science, or SPED expect not to have a job in May. This can be an incredibly scary and daunting position to be headed towards, but it is also completely normal. Schools do not even start thinking about the next school year until late June/early July. This isn’t to say you shouldn’t even start your search until then, but don’t panic until August 1st. Perhaps you’re a self-driven “go-getter” who just knows in your heart you’re going to be one of the few with a job. That’s great, be determined, but know that the system you’re headed towards does not really reward go-getters, and often you’ll feel like you’re constantly speeding up to a red light. The people who are graduating with a job are either: student teaching at a school that has an opening, their CT is head of the department, or they return to the high school they themselves attended. There is nothing wrong with using connections, but if you’re not in the one of the above three categories, it is a tough process to get your foot in the door. Thousands of teachers just like you go through this process every year. Breathe, and you will be fine.

2.) There will be peaks and valleys

There will be days that you are nailing it; there will be days where you are wallowing in self-pity on the carpet blubbering about how you’re un-hirable (and maybe un-lovable) and should crawl under a rock and die. As with any job search, the journey is a long one and is filled with peaks and valleys. This is something that your education prep courses notoriously under-prepared you for. To start with, they do not give you a real scope of just how much time the search itself is going to take you and the courses, (no matter how many resume building classes you attend) can’t prepare you for how personal it feels when you never get a call back, or a reply email. The valleys are so long and so deep and the peaks are so short that you may accidentally trip over one on the way to another valley. You present the best version of yourself for so long and seem to still face rejection at every corner. There will be days where you get that email or a principal will leave a voicemail and you will feel as if you have vanquished a monster every time. Those are glorious times in the kingdom. Know this: it is not personal, there is nothing wrong with you, keep up the good fight.

3.) Take Sundays for you

Obviously being determined is important and you want to start early and have your application materials (resume, letters of rec…etc) as soon as you can get them together. However, nothing ever gets accomplished on a Sunday. It’s rare for any principals to be in their office, district offices certainly aren’t open, and everything shuts down on a Sunday. In the mad, stressful search that is finding your first teaching position, take Sundays for you. Go to the movies, hang out with friends, go swimming. Whatever the case may be you will never get anything accomplished on a Sunday, so you might as well take the day to unwind and enjoy what little of a summer you have. A lot of your search is going to be about balance and not stressing yourself out into a panic. Taking one day a week is a very manageable way to organize your time and make sure you’re not going to get burned out too early.

4.) Everyone’s a critic

Teaching is a unique profession in the sense that everyone around you, teachers or not, will think they know how to do it and will give you advice on your job search. Random people will ask “well, did you call any principals yet?” and you’re supposed to act shocked at this revelation that is going to single-handedly turn your career around. Your friends and family will mean well, which it makes it very difficult to get upset with them when they turn to you in May wondering why you haven’t found work. You have done your research; you know when districts start hiring or when they have career fairs…etc, just hold your head up high. It’s difficult when you feel you’re doing every little thing you can to find a job and your family and friends are breathing down your neck and offering patronizing advice like “make sure you have extra copies of your resume.” Extra copies? WHAT? Slow down, let me get a pen, I want to get all of this written down! The best advice is to smile and nod and don’t let their ignorance of our profession get under your skin.

 5.) Learn to love the hoops

Contrary to what movies (and your family) will tell you, teaching is not a one “30-minute-interview-handshake” sort of thing anymore (see #2). A very plausible scenario: you to attend a career fair and give a 5-minute meet and greet, to which they will schedule another follow-up interview (usually lasting about 30-40 minutes) after that interview you would make it to the second round, which is a 20 minute teaching demonstration lesson, followed by an hour-long debrief on your lesson’s strengths and weaknesses. Finally they’d narrow it down to two candidates, and you would have to interview an additional time for the position, then wait a week and a half while the principal/admin team makes their decision for which you have a 50/50 shot at. That is roughly 4-5 hoops to jump through. Urban districts, rural districts, and every district in between have a lengthy screening process that, (unless you’re in one of the three categories mentioned in #1) will take some time to complete. There is no way around this process, and the only way to win the game is to play it. You will have to love the process, because if you don’t life will become a meaningless abyss and you’ll end up like one of those teaching majors who take some desk job somewhere and convince themselves they’re happier not being in a classroom. Stick with it! It is what everyone else is doing and you will make it out alive.

6.) There aren’t always right answers

So congrats, you landed the interview! That is a feat in and of itself because principals and assistant principals have to sort through so many different resumes and qualified applications that making the cut that first time is a success. When looking for your first teaching job out of college, it is hard to get out of that “right/wrong, black/white, yes/no” mentality. In your education classes there were right or wrong answers. However, in interviews with principals (especially the earlier ones) they are just looking for how you think or how you shape your ideas/philosophy over time. Answer the questions as succinctly and honestly as you can. Sometimes they may ask a question you know nothing about, such as a specific theory or score-reporting software. In these cases, just admit you’re unfamiliar with whatever concept they are asking you about, but are willing to do some independent research. Hundreds of applicants will be b.s.-ing answers all day to their faces, and most principals will thank you for your honesty. Get out of that “right/wrong” dichotomy because it’s going to put a lot more stress on you when speaking with the principal. There is, of course, the possibility that whomever is interviewing you will hate all your answers, and that’s fine (see #7) that just means it’s somewhere you don’t want to be, or wouldn’t “gel” well with the rest of the staff.

7.) Go to every interview

This sounds like common sense, and the angry skeptic might read this point as “oh yeah, let me turn down all the NOTHING I’m getting offered.” Hold tight. After working your way through May and June and maybe even early July you will finally start to get some traction. Schools will start calling you back slowly, but surely. Think of it as the first snowflake of an avalanche, or the first drop in a rainstorm, or whatever various “more will come” metaphor you’d prefer. You start to hack your way through the jungle of hoops and a few schools tell you you’re being “highly considered” or “you’re the favorite candidate for this position.” That is great news! However, be wary of ever assuming you’ve got a job in the bag. There may be a point where you’re so sure one school wants to hire you, and then you’ll get another call. Go to that interview. Until your signature is ink on paper, keep jumping through the hoops. Sometimes the best school will contact you later in the year and might be the best thing for you. The universe is a random and chaotic thing, so keep as many options open as possible and be careful about shutting doors too quickly.  

8.) Don’t kid yourself on where you want to be

In line with #6, be honest about what kind of environment, and what kind of student body you want to teach. Some of your peers will opt for the more rural areas where you have to drive 30 minutes to get to a Wal-Mart; the class sizes are smaller and the kids have a lot of parental involvement. However, some of your peers will opt for more urban areas, some of your peers will opt for a suburb area or a private school; they all have pros and cons. At any rate, make sure you know what kind of area you want to be in, and make those a top priority in your search for a job. Spending a year in an environment you hate will drive you nuts and, frankly, it will rub off on your students and will be a bad situation all around. When you feel like you’re drowning, you might be quick to accept “any port in a storm,” and this is entirely natural. However, fight this urge. Your students will sense it, your administration will sense it, and that’s bad news. You may be waiting a bit longer, and other jobs might pass you up in the meantime, but it is better to wait for a position you could really see yourself in rather than taking the first offer that comes along.

 9.) Your resume will never matter as much as your personality

Over the years you may have added many fellow education majors to Facebook (through classes, for projects, whatever.) You will have seen these peers teach in classes, and through four years you’ll have a rough idea of how these men and women are in a classroom. These peers will forget to turn on projectors, refuse to accept any criticisms of their lesson plans, or speak so softly they couldn’t command an army of ants let alone a classroom. Every other day you will see someone post a status announcing their new position of gainful employment. Some of these people you will remark “oh, good for them!” and for others your jaw will drop in disbelief that some district out there in the world gave that person a job. It’s rude, it’s petty, but you will think it. Bottom line: be prepared to see bad teachers get jobs before you. That’s because they met with a principal who, more than likely, just felt like that applicant would be a “good fit” for their building. Often they are correct. Your resume is incredibly important to getting your foot in the door, but at the end of the day that personality has to shine through because that is what’s going to clinch you the job.

10.) We are all on the same ship

There are some who believe that finding your first teaching job is a zero-sum game. (Your loss is their win.) These people will commonly say things like “I’m not sharing any of my resources!” or “Why would I tell people about openings I know about? Then someone else could get them!” Do not, under any circumstances, choose to be one of those people. Teaching is a profession built on collaboration and the people who respond to the stress of searching for a job by lashing out and treating everyone like the enemy make this process practically unbearable. Sometimes a friend will get a call from an urban school, and she’ll pass your name along to them instead because she’d prefer something more rural. Sometimes it is just that easy. We, as educators, have enough to deal with trying to find that first job without worrying about our peers stabbing us in the back.  We are all passengers on the same ship just trying to get into classrooms to inspire and foster students. Rest assured you will get into a classroom, and all the effort will be worth it. Once you finally secure that job, do you really want to turn around and see that no one’s behind you because you were more interested in stepping on necks than helping people out?

One day your grandkids will ask “what was the best day of your life?” and having kids and grandkids and winning the lottery and solving the world’s problems will pale in comparison to the day a principal calls you to offer you the position. That moment is coming; be prepared and try to relax.

anonymous asked:

Hiii do you know anything I can do to attract a job? I've been applying like crazy but it's a year now and I'm using all the help I could get! Thank you x

Great question and I would be happy to help.  A bunch of my friends joke around about me being able to find jobs in a snap.  It is one of my “magic” powers.  

Before we get to any magic, might I advise a couple of different routes you may not be considering?  I always like to take a real world approach before handing out any spells.  I am not an old lady by any means, but I have learned a thing or two, and I think I might be able to help.  (Whether you like this type of advice is entirely up to you, but take it from me: the job market can be tough to navigate and sometimes it helps hearing this kind of advice from someone who has been down that road.)

Originally posted by tinaillustration

1.  Have you recently updated/revised your resume and cover letter?  Seriously, sometimes people do not hire you based on the content in your cover letter.  The wording could be off-putting, it could be too long (or too short), it could be not informative enough.  Cultivating your cover letter and resume is like crafting a spell; it needs to be worded correctly, express who you are as an employee in a concise manner, and make you seem as hireable as possible.  (You could also put a sigil on your cover letter and resume without anyone ever knowing using invisible ink or printing in white.) . A great website for formatting your cover letter and resume to make it look like THE BOMB DOT COM is CVMKR.

2.  Have you applied for every available job, including the ones that you may think you are “above”?  Listen, I have a BFA in Photographic Imagery; I didn’t exactly choose the most profitable and available field in the world.  I loved every bit of time I spent in college learning about art (and other various topics) and I am incredibly proud of what I accomplished.  I am still very passionate about my work, but the fact of the matter is that dream jobs are incredibly hard to come by.  There were plenty of times I had to suck up my pride and apply at places I thought I was too good for.  That includes fast food chains and restaurants, data entry, and even sales positions for companies I knew were absolute bullshit (the sales companies, not everything else.)  It took me years of gaining experience, freelancing, working for next to absolutely nothing, and busting my ass to get to where I am today.  So, if you haven’t gone down to McDonald’s or Walmart, you might want to lace up your boots and get to walking.  Money is money anyway you slice it, even if it means working at a place you aren’t necessarily are proud of.  I know that seems like tough love, but it is true.

My dad once told me, “You only get out of life what you put into it.”  I put in hours upon hours of literal blood, sweat, and tears, sleepless nights, going hungry and almost being homeless, paying thousands upon thousands of dollars back to student loans, and I have only JUST gotten what I would consider to be a dream job.  I believed in what I was doing every day.  I got up even when I didn’t want to.  You just have to keep trying, even when things seem grim.

3.  There are quite a few spells involving careers and money.  I am going to refer you to @urbanspellcraft and @flowing-to-the-ocean’s spells.  I trust their work to help you along the way, but just know that magic can only take you so far.  In the amount of time you would spend working during an average work day (8+ hours), you need searching and applying for jobs, calling employers for interviews, and going to temp agencies.  If not, you won’t find a job.  Take it from me, as someone who spent the better part of a decade struggling to find a career and finally–FINALLY–got her dream job.  You can do it, you just have to try.

* Spell to Get the Job You Want
* Spell for Job Seekers

Scam Job Offer Warning

If anyone is searching for Design, Art, Illustration, Etc. work online through job sites beware. I was recently scammed by people pretending to belong to a real, existing design company. I didn’t notice the red flags because I was so desperate to get a job in my field. Its silly now that I didn’t notice them.

They contact you with your information that they gather through job host sites like Indeed and e-mail you asking you to send them your resume/portfolio and a cover letter. Real enough right? Then its gets weird. They then notify you you’ve been ‘accepted to the next stage of the interview process.’ They want to have an interview through Google Chat.

This was the biggest red flag I missed. No interview is done without speaking. There are phone interviews, skype interviews, but no chat interviews. 

Of course I ‘aced the interview’ (cause its a scam) and they said they would e-mail me my contract of hire (a pages doc with no letter head. Fishy.) and a pdf copy of a check to deposit for equipment purchase through their vendor.

Funnily enough their check didn’t cash. (duh duh duh) and when I chatted with them on the chat about it they asked if I could ‘front the money until the check cleared on the 12th.’ I said no, I can’t afford that. Then they asked if I could front half. That’s when I smelled a rat, and so did my dad. How does a multi billion dollar company owned by Microsoft not have the dough to cover new employee equipment costs?

I stalled the guy in the chat and my dad and I searched the company for listed complaints. We found out they had attempted to scam dozens of designers like me. They ‘hire you’ then immediately try to extract your bank info from you after cutting you an equipment coverage check.

I blocked the guy on Gchat. Unsurprisingly the check dissolved. I reported the scam to my bank and made sure my account was secure. Luckily they didn’t get my bank info or SS Number. Still they got too much info on me for my liking, including my name, birthday and parents address (current home address).

Today (two days later) after the sting of embarrassment of being duped passed, I got an e-mail from Creative Circle (a company I also seek employment through) who has had lots of report of similar people being scammed into fake jobs to extract their info.

PLEASE be careful. I know phones and interviews are stressful and chat interviews sound all good but they are FAKE.
Please stay safe. And remember if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is. 
Research your companies, check employee statements on Glassdoor or even Google. If you’re still unsure contact the company’s HR department. Talk to a live human. 
Don’t be like me, don’t be blinded by your need or desire to find a job in your field that you miss the obvious signs. Looking back I still feel like a total idiot but this idiot is hoping to save fellow idiots the trouble.
Watch for scammers. Be smart. Be safe.
Love, Skidar.

anonymous asked:

Hi! I'm moving at the end of the year to a new city and I need to find a job to be able to keep paying for my apartment once I'm there (savings will only go so far you know) do you have any tips for getting a new job in a new city in a very short amount of time?

I always recommend that you have at least 3 months worth of your expenses paid before moving out on your own. Expenses include: rent, utilities, internet, food, travel, etc. Three months gives you a just-in-case cushion, which you may very well need.

In terms of finding a job quickly, I’d say that putting yourself out there and networking is key. Use your connections. Make connections now while you’re still living elsewhere. Polish you resume and talk yourself up. Work on your interview skills. Become accomplished at asking other people questions about their lives/jobs/whatever. People love being asked questions about their lives, no matter how mundane. Create lasting good impressions! Follow up on your conversations.

Remember that it’s okay to settle for a sub-par job at first, something that doesn’t pay you enough to have any savings. While at that job, start looking for a better job. Keep looking, and something will eventually open up. 

Good luck! XX

anonymous asked:

Hello! Im scared of getting a job because I feel like I'd mess up and embarrass myself. I understand that I should just do it, but i'm scared. /:

No need to feel embarrassed! The job hunt is stressful for everyone, that’s why we have written a TON of blogs about it. I’m not sure if you mean working/resume building while you’re in school or after you graduate, so I’ll give you some resources for both! :)

Interviewing/Resumes:

Working While in School:

The Post-Grad Job Hunt:

Saving Money:

This help you get started on preparing. Don’t be scared, you got this!

35 Powerful Affirmations That Can Change Your Life

Life extends from the thoughts and emotions that you experience. This means that employing affirmations of positive words can have a powerful effect on how you feel and help boost you to new levels of achievement.

Affirmations are proven methods of self-improvement because of their ability to rewire our brains. Much like exercise, they raise the level of feel-good hormones and push our brains to form new clusters of “positive thought” neurons. In the sequence of thought-speech-action, affirmations play an integral role by breaking patterns of negative thoughts, negative speech, and, in turn, negative actions.

Repeat the below aloud and with conviction in the morning and after a few days you will notice the shift in your mood, perception, and interpretation of any given situation.

1.) I am the architect of my life; I build its foundation and choose its contents.

2.) Today, I am brimming with energy and overflowing with joy.

3.) My body is healthy; my mind is brilliant; my soul is tranquil.

4.) I am superior to negative thoughts and low actions.

5.) I have been given endless talents which I begin to utilize today.

6.) I forgive those who have harmed me in my past and peacefully detach from them.

7.) A river of compassion washes away my anger and replaces it with love.

8.) I am guided in my every step by Spirit who leads me towards what I must know and do.

9.) (If you’re married) My marriage is becoming stronger, deeper, and more stable each day.

10.) I possess the qualities needed to be extremely successful.

11.) (For business owners) My business is growing, expanding, and thriving.

12.) Creative energy surges through me and leads me to new and brilliant ideas.

13.) Happiness is a choice. I base my happiness on my own accomplishments and the blessings I’ve been given.

14.) My ability to conquer my challenges is limitless; my potential to succeed is infinite.

15.) (For those who are unemployed) I deserve to be employed and paid well for my time, efforts, and ideas. Each day, I am closer to finding the perfect job for me.

16.) I am courageous and I stand up for myself.

17.) My thoughts are filled with positivity and my life is plentiful with prosperity.

18.) Today, I abandon my old habits and take up new, more positive ones.

19.) Many people look up to me and recognize my worth; I am admired.

20.) I am blessed with an incredible family and wonderful friends.

21.) I acknowledge my own self-worth; my confidence is soaring.

22.) Everything that is happening now is happening for my ultimate good.

23.) I am a powerhouse; I am indestructible.

24.) Though these times are difficult, they are only a short phase of life.

25.) My future is an ideal projection of what I envision now.

26.) My efforts are being supported by the universe; my dreams manifest into reality before my eyes.

27.) (For those who are single) The perfect partner for me is coming into my life sooner than I expect.

28.) I radiate beauty, charm, and grace.

29.) I am conquering my illness; I am defeating it steadily each day.

30.) My obstacles are moving out of my way; my path is carved towards greatness.

31.) I wake up today with strength in my heart and clarity in my mind.

32.) My fears of tomorrow are simply melting away.

33.) I am at peace with all that has happened, is happening, and will happen.

34.) My nature is Divine; I am a spiritual being.

35.) My life is just beginning.

fortitude-sakura  asked:

I'm applying for a job position that was posted internally. What should I send in an email to the director in terms of an application? The company I work for is small and has a startup vibe, but I don't want to be too informal nor do I want to be too formal as well.

Hey there!

I would recommend going for formal rather than informal. Even though this is a start-up company, the more “Adult” you seem in every interaction you have with them, the better.

I would recommend sending something like:

Dear __________,

I’m writing to you in regards to the ________ position that has just opened up. I’d like to apply for the job and was hoping to interview with you. Attached is my resume and contact information. Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions.

Sincerely,

- _________

If they do not respond within a few days, write back.

10

My novel, All the Crooked Saints, comes out tomorrow (10/10), but since I’ll be talking about that tomorrow, I thought today I’d instead talk about books that you could also snag while you were wandering or clicking through a bookstore — these are books I’ve either loved, have just picked up, or are about to pick up myself.

Titles and first lines:

LESS, by Andrew Sean Greer.

From where I sit, the story of Arthur Less is not so bad. Look at him: seated primly on the hotel lobby’s plush round sofa, blue suit and white shirt, legs knee-crossed so that one polished loafer hangs free of its heel. The pose of a young man. His slim shadow is, in fact, still that of his younger self, but at nearly fifty he is like those bronze statues in public parks that, despite one lucky knee rubbed raw by schoolchildren, discolor beautifully until they match the trees. So has Arthur Less, once pink and gold with youth, faded like the sofa he sits on, tapping one finger on his knee and staring at the grandfather clock.

DISAPPEARED, by Francisco X. Stork.

On the morning of November 14, the day she was kidnapped, Linda Fuentes opened the door to my house, where my family was having breakfast. As usual, I wasn’t ready. 

ABSOLUTELY ON MUSIC, by Haruki Murakami & Seiji Ozawa.

Until we started the interviews in this book, I had never had a serious conversation with Seiji Ozawa about music. True, I lived in Boston from 1993 to 1995, while he was still music director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and I would often go to concerts he conducted, but I was just another anonymous fan in the audience.

WILD BEAUTY, by Anna-Marie McLemore.

Later, they would blame what happened on the little wooden horses. Estrella had found them when she was five, the set of them dust-frosted and forgotten on a high shelf. They had been small enough to fit in her hands, carved wooden wings sprouting from their backs.

LOVE MINUS EIGHTY, by Will McIntosh.

The woman across the aisle from Rob yammered on as the micro-T rose above street level, threading through the Perrydot Building, lit offices buzzing past in a colorful blur. He should have taken his Scamp. Public transport was simpler, but he always seemed to share a compartment with someone who didn’t have the courtesy to subvocalize.

MOONGLOW, by Michael Chabon.

This is how I heard the story. When Alger Hiss got out of prison, he had a hard time finding a job. He was a graduate of Harvard Law School, had clerked Oliver Wendell Holmes and helped charter the United Nations, yet he was also a convicted perjurer and notorious as a tool of international communism. He had published a memoir, but it was dull stuff and no one wanted to read it.

I AM NOT YOUR PERFECT MEXICAN DAUGHTER, by Erika L. Sanchez.

What’s surprised me most about seeing my sister dead is the lingering smirk on her face. Her pale lips are turned up ever so slightly, and someone has filled in her patchy eyebrows with a black pencil. The top half of her face is angry — like she’s ready to stab someone — and the bottom half is almost smug. This is not the Olga I knew.

THE STONE SKY, by N. K. Jemisin.

Time grows short, my love. Let’s end with the beginning of the world, shall we? Yes. We shall. It’s strange, though. My memories are like insects fossilized in amber. They are rarely intact, these frozen, long-lost lives. Usually there’s just a leg, some wing-scales, a bit of lower thorax—a whole that can only be inferred from fragments, and everything blurred together through jagged, dirty cracks.

THUNDERHEAD, by Neal Shusterman.

Peach velvet with embroidered baby-blue trim. Honorable Scythe Brahms loved his robe. True, the velvet became uncomfortably hot in the summer months, but it was something he had grown accustomed to in his sixty-three years as a scythe. He had recently turned the corner again, resetting his physical age back to a spry twenty-five — and now, in his third youth, he found his appetite for gleaning was stronger than ever.

STRANGE WEATHER, by Joe Hill.

Shelly Beukes stood at the bottom of the driveway, squinting up at our pink-sandstone ranch as if she had never seen it before. She wore a trench coat fit for Humphrey Bogart and carried a big cloth handbag printed with pineapples and tropical flowers. She could’ve been on her way to the supermarket, if there were one in walking distance, which there wasn’t. I had to look twice before I registered what was wrong with the picture: She had forgotten to put on her shoes, and her feet were filthy, almost black with grime.

anonymous asked:

Do you have any tips for people around high school age looking for jobs 15-18? Would be very helpful, thanks!

Before you do anything:

First impressions are one of your most powerful assets as a job hunter! No matter your age, your ability to carry yourself and to speak confidently will be admired. Unfortunately, the 15-18 age range is notorious for not being “adult” enough, so it’s very important that you work to set yourself apart.

1. Phone calls: Get comfortable talking to strangers on the phone ASAP. I’ve worked in customer service for eight years (four of which were spent in a call center), a good phone voice can make all the difference. Most potential employers do not respond well to “like” and “um”, many won’t even meet with you if you have “young” phone voice.

2. Correspondence: There’s a lot of correspondence that happens before an actual job interview takes place. Be prompt and courteous in all your correspondence, and always check your emails/texts for grammatical or spelling errors before you send them.

3. Looking older: Is there something quick you can do to make yourself look older? Maybe putting your hair up in a bun, growing a mustache, wearing glasses, etc. If you have a very young looking face like me, wear obvious make up.

4. References: Accumulate an impressive list of professional references. Potential employers always ask for references, but I’ve had several employers only call one of my references. Here are some people who you can ask to be your reference:

  • Your old teacher
  • Your old guidance counselor
  • Your old co-worker
  • An old camp counselor
  • Someone who trained you at a job
  • A family friend who owns a respectable business

5. Arrive early: Arrive significantly early for your interview. I recommend arriving a half hour before your interview, because it will set a nice precedent for your timeliness. If there is a receptionist or people working in the area that you are waiting, be chatty and ask them questions about the job. Offices are gossipy, so the more favorable impressions you make- the better!

6. Follow up: After your interview, wait several hours and send a nice email thanking your potential employer for the opportunity to meet with them. If you don’t hear from them within a week of your interview, reach out with an email asking if there’s anything else they need from you. If you don’t get the job, be courteous in your response to them and say something like “Thank you for the opportunity, I hope you’ll consider me in the future”. If you do that, they will consider you in the future!

anonymous asked:

Can you link your job interview tips? I can never find them :(

I know… I’m working on an index sort of thing to help people find posts. Stay tuned!

The Interview

1. Work on your interviewing skills. Your resume will get you through the door, but your personality is what will eventually win you a job. Extroverts have an easier time turning on the charm, but introverts may have to work harder to gain the same ease of conversation. I would recommend seeing some amateur theater or live music performances in your community. Go to a high school musical, see the college Drama Club’s new play. You want the chance to see different levels of confidence in people. Just by watching the performers you’ll be able to easily see who is comfortable being the center of attention and who is not. Let the mistakes or triumphs you see on stage influence the movements, eye contact, and tone of voice that you will use when addressing potential employers. Also, if you don’t want to actually go out, there are loads of community theater youtube videos.

2. Practice makes perfect. Come up with a list of questions that an employer might ask you, and ready your answers confidently. Have a friend “interview” you and have them rate you based on how you respond. If your friend is too positive about your performance, get another one to interview you. You want honesty, you want critiques! If you have no friends or relatives who are able to help you, record yourself answering questions using a webcam. Luckily, there are lots of posts about job interviews on the internet. This is a good one.

3. Talk yourself up. In the interview, you never want to even imply that there is an aspect of the job that you can’t handle. You don’t want to outright lie, but exaggerate your skill levels knowing that once you get in the door, you’ll be competent enough. Never say “I don’t know that skill” say “I’ve heard a lot about that skill, and I’m interested to learn more”.

4. Ask questions. After the interviewer has asked you all their questions about the prospective job, make sure to ask them several questions in return. The more, the better. Really, truly, honestly. Ask them so many goddamn questions that they feel like they’re being interviewed! These questions should be as specific as possible and should show your interest in the company. Tie in any tidbits of information that you picked up on during your interview, and reiterate important points. Remember, people love talking about their jobs. Use this to your advantage. Get your interviewer talking about the different aspects of what they like and dislike.

5. Follow up. Send a “thank you” email to your prospective employer directly after meeting them. Thank them for taking the time to meet with you, and let them know that you look forward to hearing from them soon. This will show that you have initiative and follow through. Employers love that shit.

Feel free to message me directly about any of this information! I literally got an incredible job by beefing up my resume and talking myself up.

Job Hunting Masterpost

Asking Questions

General Job Advice

How to Include Dungeons & Dragons on Your Resume

How to Write A Cover Letter

How to Write A Cover Letter 2

How to Write A Resume (Like A Boss)

Job Hunting Support

Job Interview Outfits

My Post on Job Hunting

Professional Email Address (For Resumes)

Resume Tips

Strong Words to Use on A Resume

Talk Yourself Up!

Tips for Teenagers

Clexa Aesthetics - Mechanic AU

Clarke Griffin owns a mechanic shop in a small town called Polis. It’s her father’s legacy and she’s struggling to keep the business alive. Meanwhile, Lexa Woods, the girl who lives in the apartment above the shop, is struggling to be alive. Since she left college she doesn’t find a steady job and she’s running out of money to pay the rent. This is why they decide to work together.

Hog the bathroom every morning? Let me make it more comfortable for you.

My brother is staying over for the next few months while he finds a new job. I got him something temporary that requires us both to wake up at the same time. Note: He pays no rent, and doesn’t know how to do much in the house like cooking or laundry.

We share the bedroom and the only bathroom. When my alarm goes off and wakes me up, it wakes him up too, but he rushes into the bathroom before and spends at least half an hour in there, making it difficult for me to get ready as he hogs the bathroom and I need to shower, brush my teeth, etc. When I asked him if he could wake up earlier to go use the bathroom, he said it takes him 45 minutes and he doesn’t want to wake up so much earlier just for that.

Talking to him hasn’t worked. So, a friend of mine suggested a smart watch or fitness band since they wake you up silently. I got a cheap Fitbit off ebay to start waking me up  (fuck yeah, silent alarms).

But here’s my revenge. Every single night, I sprinkle chili flakes on my dinner. I love spicy food, but don’t eat it that much as it irritates my stomach.

I now wake up without waking him up, and as soon as I turn on the tap he’s awake and he wants to use the bathroom.

But here’s the thing: the last thing I do in the bathroom every morning is take a shit that can only be described as toxic.

Day 3 now, and he complains twice a day, and no words have sounded sweeter to my ears.