finding the new black

A Collection Of Books By Neurologist Oliver Sacks

If you’re interested in neuroscience or psychology, I’d highly reccomend any book by Oliver Sacks! I get asked a lot about books to read so you can also check out this video I made with my top 7 and this masterpost which includes websites where you can learn more!

1. Migrane

For centuries, physicians have been fascinated by the many manifestations of migraine, and especially by the visual hallucinations or auras- similar in some ways to those induced by hallucinogenic drugs or deliria–which often precede a migraine. Dr. Sacks describes these hallucinatory constants, and what they reveal about the working of the brain. 

2. Awakenings

Awakenings is the remarkable account of a group of patients who contracted sleeping-sickness during the great epidemic just after World War I. Frozen in a decades-long sleep, these men and women were given up as hopeless until 1969, when Dr. Sacks gave them the then-new drug L-DOPA, which had an astonishing, explosive, “awakening” effect. Dr. Sacks recounts the moving case histories of these individuals, the stories of their lives, and the extraordinary transformations they underwent with treatment.

3. The Island of The Color Blind

Oliver Sacks has always been fascinated by islands, and this book is an account of his work with an isolated community of islanders born totally colorblind.  He listens to these achromatopic islanders describe their colorless world in rich terms of pattern and tone, luminance and shadow.

4. Uncle Tungsten

A book about Sacks’ childood;  his discovery of biology, his departure from his childhood love of chemistry and, at age 14, a new understanding that he would become a doctor.

5. An Anthropologist on Mars

This book talks about 7 seemingly paradoxical neurological conditions: including a surgeon consumed by the compulsive tics of Tourette’s Syndrome except when he is operating; an artist who loses all sense of color in a car accident, but finds a new sensibility and creative power in black and white; and an autistic professor who has great difficulty deciphering the simplest social exchange between humans, but has built a career out of her intuitive understanding of animal behavior. 

6.  Seeing Voices

 A journey into the world of deaf culture, and the neurological and social underpinnings of the remarkable visual language of the congenitally deaf. Sacks writes “The existence of a visual language, Sign, and the visual intelligence that goes with its acquisition, shows us that the brain is rich in potentials we would scarcely have guessed of, shows us the almost unlimited resource of the human organism when it is faced with the new and must adapt.”

Yall remember that game on Tumblr when you anonymously send a ask with your number and you text for a week and get to know people before seeing them and vibe?

Can we bring that back? I literally met some of the best people.

Basically you just reblog. Go through the tags and just pick random people and connect to meet new people. You might find your soulmate 👀👀
Reblogg like shit. BLACK TUMBLR WHERE YALL AT!

REBLOG ASAP so we can get this shit going. Rules: 1. Do not be an asshole. 2. You must stay anonymous for the entire week. 3. You basically call each other by the name of your city.(whatever nickname you come up with whatever) 4. When the week is up, reveal your URL and however else you tryna reveal yourself. 5. If somebody not feeling you and they don’t want to text you any longer. Do NOT abuse said number. Thank you. IMPORTANT. My nigga have fun.

@all you ‘’’’’’sapphic blogs’’’’’’, you’ll know yourselves

This might be a little wild, but what if I told you

that black wlw

aren’t??? inherently??masculine??

I know it’s a strange concept but hear me out

Black femme lesbians,,,,,exist

Black(especially dark skinned) femme lesbians can be just as feminine as non black lesbians

I’m so damn sick and tired of going onto every feminine or ‘’lipstick lesbian’’’ blog and seeing nothing but thin, white or white-passing women being represented

What about black girls with flower crowns and soft makeup and glowing skin?

What about thicker black girls who are thick in the ‘conventionally sexy’ areas?

 What about thicker black girls who aren’t but are just as beautiful and feminine?

What about thin black girls? 

What about trans black girls? 

What about black girls who aren’t the same pictures that you people keep reusing over and over again, because it doesn’t matter enough to you find new ones?

Black girls are beautiful

Feminine black girls are ethereal and gorgeous

I don’t care if black women don’t fit your feminine sapphic #moodboards and #aesthetic

Black femme lesbians and feminine wlw are valid 

Stop trying to erase our femininity 

P.S.- This is in no way trying to invalidate butch lesbians, or otherwise GNC female aligned wlwoc. You are all absolutely breathtaking, regardless of how you wish to present.

Evidence for gay Sirius Black:

  • Straight up ignored girls, despite getting loads of attention from them
  • Lived with Lupin in at least two different houses (‘lie low at Lupin’s’ and ‘Lupin, who was staying in the house with Sirius’)
  • Bought joint Christmas presents for his godson with a bloke
  • About clocked Snape for attacking Lupin
  • ‘Too busy being a rebel to settle down’ or alternatively ‘too busy just straight up loving men to get a wife/girlfriend’

Evidence for straight Sirius Black:

  • Had a poster on the wall of his childhood bedroom
  • ??
  • ???????
  • ??????????
Black Marble: NASA View Illuminates Earth at Night

When the sun goes down, the lights on Earth shine bright. A new look using our satellite data captures the lights coming from our neighborhoods, vehicles, buildings, factories, fishing vessels and other human activity brightening the night.

Our scientists have just released the first new global map of Earth at night since 2012. This nighttime view of our home planet, dubbed the Black Marble, provides researchers with a unique perspective of human activities around the globe.

By studying Earth at night, researchers can investigate how and why cities expand, monitor light intensity to estimate energy use and economic activity, and aid in disaster response in near-real time.

The data on Earth at night comes from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite, jointly managed by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

VIIRS captures visible and infrared light, allowing researchers to glimpse the Earth as it looks to astronauts peering out of the International Space Station. The new map is a composite of data collected in 2016, and it took several months of processing to filter out clouds, moonlight, airglow, and other interfering features to create the global image. In the coming months our scientists will release daily nighttime lights data at even finer resolutions for the first time.

The East Coast sparkles with population hubs, suburbs circling cities and major roadways. The I-95 corridor includes the most densely populated region of the United States – the stretch from Washington, DC to Boston.

To get images like these from the satellite data, our scientists had to filter out moonlight, aerosols and other sources of extraneous light – the goal is to eventually be able to detect the lights from a single building or fishing boat.

Daytime satellite images, like this one from Landsat 8, can show us the forests, deserts, mountains, waterways and built-up cities. Add a nighttime view, and scientists can study when and how people are using these limited resources – like the lights tracing the Nile River leading to the metropolis of Cairo, Egypt.

Lights aren’t confined to land. With the global nighttime view, the ocean is dotted with fishing fleets, including boats that try to attract their catch with bright lights.

What lights illuminate your neighborhood? Download a high-resolution version of the Black Marble HERE, and find out more about our new night lights data HERE.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

I spent a lot of time wishing that I could’ve been the pretty girl, but my eyes were never blue enough (they’re brown), and my skin was never smooth enough. And, then I desperately wished I could’ve been the smart girl, but come this fall I will not be attending Dartmouth. A small part of me even wanted to be the sporty girl, but I was the type of girl to skip gym class. The type of girl to drink coffee at 2:00 A.M. so, she could read into the night. The type of girl to love boys with fickle hearts. The type of girl to get lost. The type of girl who who found her self amongst a bed of roses, and heartbreak. In trying to be what I couldn’t be, I became who I am. I am that girl.
—  m.n // excerpt from a book I’ll never write (19)
I need new blogs to follow

Like or reblog if you post any of the following:

Steven Universe

Voltron

Adventure Time

Studio Ghibli

Harry Potter

Fantastic Beasts 

LOTR/The Hobbit

Hellsing

Black Butler

Yuri! on Ice

Free!

Attack on Titan

(I’m fine with most anime tbh)

Aesthetic

Thanks!

8

Jacob was simply a perpetually happy person, and he carried that happiness with him like an aura, sharing it with whoever was near him. Like an earthbound sun, whenever someone was within his gravitational pull, Jacob warmed them. It was natural, a part of who he was.

Common Micro-aggressions: African Americans and/or
Black People

Anonymous said: What are some common micro-aggressions that a black american will regularly have to deal with?

Behold this masterpost of common micro-aggressions towards African Americans and/or people in the African Diaspora, several of which may be applicable to other PoC. Micro-aggressions can be perpetuated by White people as well as fellow Black people and People of Color.

This is just to give a thorough understanding of some of the things a Black person (often in America) deals with. Don’t run forward and jam-pack your Black character with every one of these experiences, though I can say I’ve personally experienced every one of these or know someone who has.

General Micro-aggressions

  • People excusing blackface.
  • Having our grammar and annunciation corrected.
  • “I don’t see you as a Black person/ I don’t see colour.”
  • Calling Black people ghetto, thugs, rachet, sassy, urban…
  • People debating why they should be allowed to say the n-word.
  • Then saying the n-word anyway.
  • Whispering, spitting, or stumbling over the word "Black” as if it’s a curse.
  • Refusing to pronounce your name right, or just calling you by a different name that’s easier.
  • Alternatively, “jokingly” calling you a “ghetto” name.
  • Constantly mixing up unrelated and not even resembling Black people, because you know.. ‘Black people all look the same’.
  • Dismissing our experiences as “just overreacting,” defending the wronging party, or using our plight to talk about one’s own experience (e.g. “well as a gay man i’ve got it rough…”).
  • Telling racist jokes and calling you sensitive when you don’t find it funny.
  • “______  is the new civil rights movement!” Black folks are still fighting for their rights so…

Media

  • Fox news (xD)
  • Caricatured depictions of Black people on TV.
  • Casting calls for Black people only tailored for “race roles.”
  • Media treating white criminals and killers better than Black victims (see these headlines).

Stereotypes

  • Assuming you only listen to rap/hip-hop/r&b.
  • Assuming you love chicken, Kool-aid, and/or smoke weed.
  • Assuming you’re good at sports.
  • Assuming there’s no father in the picture in Black families.
  • Assuming all Black people (see: young girls) have children.
  • Calling Black people who don’t conform to one’s image of Blackness, “less black,” acting white or “oreo.”

AAVE

  • Non-Black People mimicking/imitating AAVE.
  • People falling into AAVE when talking to Black People.
  • “Why don’t Black people speak real English instead of ‘ebonics’?”

Insults/doubting intelligence:

  • You’re so articulate!”
  • You take advanced classes?!”
  • “How did she get into that [prestigious school and/or program]?”
  • “They only got x because they’re Black/Affirmative action.”
  • Assuming a Black person (usually male) attends college because of a sports scholarship.
  • Counselors discouraging Black students to take prestigious coursework, assuming it’s too difficult for them.

 Respectability politics:

  • “You’re a credit to your race.”
  • “I’m glad you’re not like those other Black people. You’re not ghetto or listen to that rap stuff..”
  • Tone policing: dismissing someone’s reaction/argument/etc. because they are too “emotional.” Thinking that we need to be calm in order to be taken seriously. 
  • Pitting African immigrants against African Americans, especially those coming to America for education, aka “Good Blacks.”

Beauty Standards and Dating

Fetishization/Othering

  • People asking you what you are or where you’re really from.
  • Referring to Black people or our features as “exotic.”
  • Referring to Black people’s skin as chocolate or other foods.

Black Women/Misogynoir

  • Saying Black women are ”strong, independent and don’t need no man.“
  • Calling Black women ”sassy“ or angry if she shows passion/emotion.
  • Referring to white and non-black women as "girls” and “women” while calling Black women “Females.”
  • [White] males who apply courtesy to white women (holding doors, giving up seat) but don’t apply the same to Black women.
  • Referring to Black women on government assistance as “welfare queens” (While ignoring that white people get more government assistance than Black people in the USA).
  • “Black women All woman are beautiful.” (Stop. That. Please.)

Hair.

  • People touching/petting your hair without consent.
  • “So is that your real hair? Are those extensions?”
  • Calling natural black hair unprofessional.
  • White people appropriating Black hair styles (dreads, twists, etc) and being praised as edgy, while it’s “ghetto, unprofessional, and unclean” on our own heads.

Poverty Assumptions:

  • “Do you live in the ghetto?”
  • “Can you afford that?”
  • “Here are the value prices of this product…”

Racial Profiling + Criminalization:

  • Crossing the street to avoid passing Black men/people.
  • Following in stores, assuming Black people are stealing.
  • Moving aside when we pass, clutching purse, locking doors.
  • Asking Black people for I.D. when paying with card (while white people are not asked).
  • Being pulled over + arrested at astonishingly higher rates than white people.

For a fuller understanding of micro aggressions and the effects it has on individuals overtime, please see this: “These incidents may appear small…”

~Mods: Colette and Alice

New study finds that moving out of segregated neighborhoods lowers black people’s blood pressure

What if I told you that getting away from things like over-policing & police brutality, constant stop-and-frisks, concentrated poverty, bank redlining & blockbusting, food deserts, limited public transportation, environmental racism, higher unemployment rates, and all the stress those things bring, what if I told you getting away from all of that is going to lower anybody’s blood pressure? Getting away from the structural racism that specifically targets black neighborhoods is good for your health. Who knew? I mean, besides black people

Conversely, if you removed all of those things from black neighborhoods—and yes, that’s entirely possible to do—then black people’s blood pressure would also drop. I’m not knocking desegregation, because that has repeatedly been demonstrated to be the greatest equalizer of all (that NIMBY America still doesn’t fully embrace) but, yeah, black people can leave the hood to escape racism, or society and racist institutions could stop targeting black neighborhoods. That could work both ways

Funny how something as simple as equal opportunity and equal treatment can lower blood pressure, huh?