finally made a psd that worked for all of these scenes

okay a couple of people asked me how i made my most recent gifset (x), so i thought i’d attempt a tutorial. sorry in advance if i’m bad at explaining it, and if you have any extra questions, feel free to drop me an ask and i’d be more than happy to clarify things. again, i do make my gifs in 536px bc there’s a lil glitch with my ps which means that i have to double the size, but i’ve posted them at 268px here for the sake of the tutorial. 

so in this tutorial, i’ll be showing you how to go from this:

to this:

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anonymous asked:

Hi, i see it your color palette meme and read the tutorial that you made, but I'm still kind of confuse. Can you do a tutorial to how to change the color? Like red to blue or green, purple ecc. I'll very grateful.

Of course, anon! I guess I’ll just show you how I colored a couple of different scenes. One is simpler and the other is a bit more complex, so I hope this tutorial covers everything!

These are the scenes I’m gonna be working with:

and these are the results:

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anonymous asked:

Hey Jaelyn, could you share the psd you used here? /post/156317277804/htgawm-3b-countdown-call-it-mothers-intuition it's so beautiful!

Omg thank you so much. I’m glad you liked it. <3

The psd I used for that set and the other htgawm3bcd gifsets are psds I made. However, the settings for the selective color layers are different from each other, so there isn’t really one psd I use for all of my gifs, you know? And even then, I’m not too familiar with the process of sharing psds, and I’m not sure if I’m confident enough to share them just yet (keyword: yet; I might be up for this in the future, but idk right now). But I can quickly show you how I colored each one, if you don’t mind.

Please like/reblog if this was helpful for you.

Note: this is just a coloring tutorial and mainly for people who have basic knowledge on making gifs already. Also, I use Photoshop CS5, but this should work with other Photoshops as well.

Alright, so we’re going from this:

to this:

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detailed colour porn tutorial - scenery

This has been a tutorial that people have been asking me to do for quite a while but I simply hadn’t had the time to do. 

I’m doing more of these “colour porn” tutorials since this one will be strictly dedicated to scenery (I was going to do all in one but it’d honestly be way too big)

Here’s a few examples of gifsets in which I’ve used this kind of tutorial xx, xxxx and xx

I’m using photoshop cs5 to make this gifset (you can use other version of photoshop though) and you need a basic knowledge on how to make gifs.

We’re going to go from this

to this

and this

and this

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9

Get To Know Me MemeFavorite TV Show [1/5]: Brooklyn Nine-Nine

A wise unsmiling man named Jerald Jimes made me realize what I am thankful for. So, I’d just like to say I am happy to be here with my family. My super weird family with two black dads, and two Latina daughters, and two white sons, and… Gina. And I don’t know what you (Scully) are. Some strange giant baby? To the Nine Nine!

anonymous asked:

i wanted to know if you could show me how to make ur gifs? i love ur tumblr so much btw! ❤

i’ve been meaning to make a tutorial for a while so here it is, finally!  
This is made for beginners! so it’s quite text heavy and long asf but still simple enough to follow (i hope) 💞

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hellandye  asked:

I'm thinking of making my own webcomic, do you have any tips?

Hi Hellandye!!! Sorry I took so long to answer this! I knew I needed a lot of time to spend on it… anyway, I’m excited you’re starting a webcomic! :D Everyone works on comics differently but I’ll tell you what helps me and maybe it’ll help you u vu)b if you’re struggling with something, let me know and I bet I could come up with another way to work on it!

1) Draw for print

  • When starting a comic, I’d always recommend drawing it at a size that can be printed bc you never know if you’ll want to print it later! Choose a size that’s good for you. 8.5″x11″, 7″x10.5″, etc. TINF is 5.25″x7.75″. (It’s recommended to draw your comic even larger than you want the final size to be, just make sure the ratio is the same! Things always look better sized down…)
  • Even if you draw your comic traditionally, make sure to scan it in and do any digital edits at a resolution no lower than 300dpi. If your resolution is lower than that, the quality won’t be as good when printed!
  • For each page I have the full size 300dpi PSD + a sized down for-web jpg (for ex, 600px wide, 72dpi).

Margins/Bleed

  • When you’re printing, you need a lot of space for margins and bleed areas that could get cut off during the print process! I’m really, truly awful about knowing this stuff tho, so I recommend googling it and checking out what printers suggest for margins and sizes for safe drawing areas. I think generally, all together, you leave 0.75″ of space around your page or something? I don’t remember the specifics but I think I usually just leave like an inch border all around LOL.

2) Planning

Think about…

  • The plot! If there’s no plot, what’s the goal? Maybe the goal is “everyone becomes friends and life is beautiful.” If that’s the case, then most of the things that happen in the comic are pointing the characters towards that goal. (Don’t get me wrong: not every single chapter has to be plot- or goal-driven. Character development arcs are great too! But what’s an anime with 900 filler episodes? No thanks…)
  • The important points of the comic! I made a bullet point list of all the important things I wanted readers to become aware of in some way in TINF (for ex, I wrote: “unknowingly meet Sydney Morgan’s publicist; meet actor Vincent Fawkes; Selby’s handwriting matches Sydney Morgan’s; Isaiah becomes suspicious of Landon and regrets ‘hiring’ him,” etc)

Summaries

  • I’m like the biggest fan of summaries EVER!!! Do a summary of your entire story. How do you want to introduce it? What’s the climax? How does it end? Really plan the beginning/end: the beginning is the backbone of the comic since it introduces the story (I regret TINF’s beginning everyday of my life, save me) + the end will be the driving force for it. The end of TINF is planned as, well… you guessed it, a summary, but I know what’s gonna go down.
  • Similarly, I do summaries of all my chapters: the beginning scene is concrete and planned out, the middle is kind of a general thought (in which you decide what you want to happen but the why can be messed around with), and the end scene is always concrete and planned out.
  • I leave the middle a general thought because comics are wild n free so it’s a lot easier to be loose and not get attached to a single idea. If you have single ideas for scenes that you’re super attached to, it becomes a real struggle because thoughts don’t always remain awesome when visualized… :’(

I’ve got my story, now how far ahead should I plan ahead?

  • Erm… I’m bad at this. This kind of thing changes the more you do comics. When I first started TINF, I had a Google doc of bullet points and ideas for about 15 chapters and I’d thumbnail at least half the chapter before I started on it. Thumbnailing a chapter is really great if you’re unsure about pacing: it helps make sure you don’t have a 50 pg intro scene, 11 pgs spent in the bathroom, and 30 pages of staring each other down DBZ style. It keeps you succinct so when someone checks back on your comic 5 months later you’re not still drawing the characters in the same room, having the same conversation about whether they should go to the mall or not. Once you get the hang of your pacing style, you can kind of procrastinate more… but… y-YOU SHOULDN’T… (don’t look at me)

3) Thumbnails

(Thumbnails are tiny versions of your pages. They’re generally sketchy and loose and are used to plan your comic visually.)

  • I put this in its own section outside of planning because thumbnails are 9000% the most important thing in my life :’D Some people work with scripts and, while I’ve planned through dialogue countless times, 1) you can’t put that much text into a page, 2) written dialogue moves a lot slower than visual dialogue in a comic–a “short” typed conversation can be pages and pages–so sometimes it’s better to plan the comic at the same time as the dialogue so the pacing is more natural. Or, if you do a script, maybe it’s not like a 100% must-be-their-dialogue type of thing.
  • Plan everything in your thumbnails: the perspective, how to draw that weird hand, where the speech bubbles are going to go (nothing worse than drawing a bg then covering it w/a bubble)… be precise! Do not stop thumbnailing if you can’t figure something out. Solve all your problems in the thumbnail stage!!!
  • I promise if you plan everything in the thumbnails (even greys/colors), inking your page will be SO FAST!!! It’ll be awesome. My record so far is 11 comic pgs in a day… (never again, please)
  • I do my thumbnails the same size ratio as a normal pg bc it makes life easier… :’)
  • Here’s an ex of my thumbnails:

(link for fullsize–I lit draw them at this size)

4) Editing

  • Always show a friend your comics or tell them your ideas and get feedback!! It’s really easy to get lost in our own little world where everything makes sense but, honestly, a lot of things in our heads are trainwrecks. I always tell my chapter ideas or show my thumbnails or pages to a friend before releasing them into the world… (the crowd cheers and someone falls to their knees, shouting praises into the air, for not having to experience my unfiltered mind)

5) Little Nicole Things

(Maybe it’s just me, maybe it’s you too! Be wild, be free, you can make comics in an infinite amount of ways, but here are some things that I think about a lot.)

The amount of text in…

  • The introduction! I’m a visual person. I generally don’t like to read. My #1 advice if you want to hook someone into your comic during the introduction is NOT to start off with a wall of text explaining everything. A straight-to-the-point, attention-grabbing introduction won’t put readers to sleep in the first 5 pgs of the comic while struggling to hit the ‘next’ button.
  • Speech bubbles! Don’t overload speech bubbles with text. If you have like 5 sentences in 1 speech bubble that’s probably too much. I know this is some style of comics so, definitely, if it’s your desire, go for it! But when things get wordy, my attention span wavers…

Pacing

  • Pacing is super tough especially when you want 900 things to happen in your comic. If you’re drawing a graphic novel or releasing your comic a chapter or more at a time, def go wild and free with pacing! I ENCOURAGE IT… it’s great.
  • BUT if you’re doing a once- or twice-a-week updated webcomic, the pacing is a lot more important. Something that helps me is: try to make at least 1 interesting thing happen in your page. If you have 1 exciting moment in your page, the tiny update for that week, hopefully, won’t feel unsatisfying.

Page size

  • Please remember to resize the page for web! Nothing is less exciting than having a 5000px wide image where I can’t even see one panel on the screen at a time.

Handwriting vs Font

  • Laughs darkly into the night over my handwriting… hi, hello there. Generally, it’s a lot easier and neater to use a font! When doing handwriting, I’d recommend using all caps because having all the letters at the same size is very smooth to read.
  • When doing handwriting, only use the hat/tail on an uppercase “I” if the “I” is the beginning of the sentence or if it’s the pronoun. For the rest, simply write it as a straight line.

Process

  • I’m going to tell you all a secret: all I do is blow up my thumbnails and ink over them. I don’t sketch. ~ur welcome~

6) Random tipz

  • Don’t get too attached to anything! Nothing destroys your entire being more than not being able to portray the scene you’ve been dreaming about for 900 years in your head perfectly.
  • Don’t force an idea! If you’re not feeling something, don’t do it. If you make your comic Everything You Love then, well, you’ll love it! If you’re bored with something, the readers will probably get bored too.
  • Progress will be fast so don’t let it get you down! It’s easy to want to give up or start over but you won’t get anywhere unless you keep pushing forward. Yes, I regret drawing like infinite # of TINF pgs, but usually you like it better later. Or, if you hate it… well… oh well… :’) verily, that is the way of the world… let’s do better next time!
  • Do 900 TINF cameos
  • Don’t be me :’)

7) HAVE FUN!!!

  • Comics can be as experimental as you want and there’s no “right” way to make them. If you decide you hated everything I said, that’s ok! Be you, have fun, express yourself, and you’ll love to make comics. And really, as long as you love it, that’s what matters the most! :D

Again, these aren’t “rules” so def do what you like, but maybe these will help! Best wishes Hellandye, lemme know if you start your comic, I wanna see!!! ILU TTvTT)))bbb

cohale  asked:

* hey, so someone's reblogged one of your many amazing edits (I did my self a favour and went through your page). I was just wondering how you achieve the still background on through the silhouette like in /post/120416727688/a-thousand-silhouettes-dancing-on-my-chest-no ? I've tried and thought of how to do it but yours looks absolutely amazing. Thanks and I hope you have a great day :)

Thank you so much cutie, that’s very nice of you to say. I’ve never made a tutorial or anything before so sorry if it’s not good.

This is a tutorial on how to make the background of your image a solid color.

You do need photoshop and basic knowledge of how to use it.

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HOW TO MAKE A BATCH OF ICONS IN PS CS6 - PART 3

[ PART 3 OF 3 ]

This is my third and final part to my mass icon tutorial. In this tutorial I will show you how to apply coloring to the icons and how to save them ALL at once.

The three parts of this tutorial:

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The lovely devilout wanted to know how to change hair colors so I thought I’d make a little ( I’m using that term lightly ) tutorial on how to do so. But fair warning, this is my first tutorial-ish so I’m not quite amazing but I did my best. 

Please like or reblog it if you found it useful or whatever. :)

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bokutou  asked:

hi! I'm sorry to bug you I was just wondering if you had any sort of tutorial for how you did this? post/126684208460/things-could-get-a-little-messy it's gorgeous and I've been trying to figure out how to do coloring like that for ages

You’re not bugging me at all :) I don’t have a tutorial and I deleted my PSD for some unknown reason (I never delete my psds???? I think I had a brain melt or something) but it’s super easy!!

#1

I don’t share colourings but with this gif

I just upped the blues with a LOT of selective colouring layers (my usual order is curves, sometimes a levels layer, brightness and contrast and then all the others) This doesn’t have many vibrance layers btw! Maybe I put one on there but I don’t think I did any vibrance layers actually (this is where saving PSDs would’ve been useful, I apologise for being an idiot). This psd is super great!! I usually don’t use psds made by other people because I like making colourings but with a couple of adjustments you’ll get similar colouring and it’s hella pretty.

#2

For this one I coloured the gif (see above) and then on top of all the layers I put the pink layer. There are already a couple of tutorials on how to do this so I recommend you check out this one and this one.

What I also do is I add additional layers that I hide on the first few frames. This allows me to cover up the tiny edges that appear when she moves. You can see in the first tutorial I recommended that after Elizabeth moves there’s a tiny edge around her chin. If you find this annoying in your own gifs (like I do) use the additional hidden layers to add some more pink to later frames. Now this takes FOREVER. Seriously. I don’t know how long this gif took me but you can’t do this in five minutes.

Here have an example. If you have a gif that moves a little bit like this one you can’t just put a colour layer on top of it because it looks terrible. 

Sorry for the watermark but I might be using this for a future gifset ;) What I now do is (whilst on the first frame!) make a couple of layers above the greenish colour layer (like 5/6) and hide them. 

I now click every single frame individually to add additional brush layers to hide any flaws:

You can see I use one of the hidden layers to put a tiny bit next to the top left of her hair :)

I pretty much do this for all the layers. If she doesn’t move much you can usually reuse the layers. 

I hope this gif makes this a little bit clearer :) I end up with this

Now it looks a bit weird but just edit it some more until it looks relatively normal. (I basically repeat the step above but with more detail)

#3

Finally all the other ones. I used pretty much the same colouring and techniques above but because there’s a gradient layer (or layers) on top of everything you can be a bit less precise. Just pick two colours you like and make a gradient map and pick a scene with a nice light or dark background because gradients work better on those.

with just the colouring

with brush layer

And finally the gradient!  

Hope this helped :)

uhhanduhh  asked:

Hey Sophia, nice job, I really enjoy your work. How are you creating your animations if you don't mind me asking?

A bunch of people have asked me this over the months, so instead of just linking to tutorials I’d like to go a little more in-depth.

My process for making animations has changed a lot in the time I’ve been doing them. I used to work almost exclusively in Flash (for animations like lighthouse ladyfish manbusy girltrain folks, and rock roller) with a little bit of Photoshop basically just for post-processing (tweaking colors with adjustment layers). I should note that when I’m animating geometric shapes I almost always make them in Illustrator, and then import them into Flash.

When I upgraded to Photoshop CS6 and then CC, I found that the animation functionality had gotten much better, so I tried it out (see beach girl and crying person). Alex Grigg’s photoshop animation tutorial, as I’ve mentioned, was invaluable here.

For some other recent animations I’ve done a hybrid approach – making geometric shapes in Illustrator and animating them in Flash, then bringing them into Photoshop to apply texture to the shapes and also do any hand-drawn animation. See “help computer” and this NYT piece.

Unfortunately, Flash CC has actually removed a lot of the features I depended on for animation (the motion editor, and inverse kinematics) so I am finally taking the plunge into learning After Effects, which I’ve been putting off for forever even though it’s industry standard. I expect it will change my approach a lot.

Before I get into the weeds with a specific example I wanna shout out Ric Carrasquillo, who has mentored me with a lot of animation stuff and is a phenomenal artist and all-around nice guy!

So the most recent animation I’ve put on tumblr is this running girl. Let me tell you how this came to be.

I have a folder on my computer called “style tests” that is filled with random scribbles, sketches, abstract color palettes, brush experiments, patterns, etc. When I feel like starting a random personal project, I peek in here and see if there’s anything that holds water. If it manages to keep my interest after wasting away in this folder for months, then it’s probably worth finishing.

Apparently I started “runner” about a year ago, in April 2013. it was initially just an idea for a static illustration in a sort of printmakey style with a limited palette. I’m sure I was thinking of this scene from Akira Kurosawa’s Dreams because it haunts me.

Anyway, it stayed like this for basically a year, then in May of 2014 I decided to do something with it. I had been thinking of the scene again and thought it would be fun to animate a run cycle.

I did rough pass animation in Flash because I find it faster and more intuitive when you’re working out timing.  The final animation is two 16-frame run cycles at 12 fps, so on the 2’s at 24 fps, basically. My first pass here is on the 2’s at 12 fps, so on the 4’s at 24 fps. I asked my coworker Matt Cruickshank for tips and he pointed out that it’s physically impossible to run with your arms and legs moving foward on the same side, which gives you fascinating insight into how little I know about this stuff

Second pass with all the frames filled out – this was sufficient for me to move to final linework.

I exported the animation from Flash as a .png sequence, then imported that into Photoshop as a video layer so that I could trace over it in a new video layer. This part was the most time-consuming and tedious, so I queued up Das Boot and had at it. Here’s a progress shot. Someone on twitter mentioned that her right arm (our left) was doing some funky stuff and he was right! I fixed it as best I could in the final. It still looks weird tho :C

When I was done with the 16-frame cycle, I duplicated it and changed her facial expression in the second round so that it wouldn’t feel too repetitive. Next: color.

Then I set up some Photoshop actions to fill in the flats. Some glitches occurred. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

When animating in Photoshop, you can create a cycling texture animation as a smart object and then clip it to a layer, video layer, or group of frame layers. This is what I did with her shirt. I made a Photoshop action to create a bunch of random blobby noise, ran it on 16 separate color layers, and clipped the resulting footage to the flat shirt shapes.

I do variations of this all the time, with static illustrations too, just to add some speckle to a solid color.

Then I spent a long time coloring all the lines………

For the background elements, I went back to Flash, using some Illustrator-made vector shapes. The hill in the background is a giant rotating circle with alternating smooth and pointy ripples.

The bush in the foreground is a spiky rectangle doing a tile tween. Both of these got punted to Photoshop as .png sequences in video layers, where I colored and textured them.

At some point in this entire process I decided to lose the spooky hand + shadow in the background (seemed too cheesy, I wanted something more ambiguous) and I also removed the kicked-up dirt, under Ric’s advice that it was driving home a point that the character animation had sufficiently made.

The sky has some texture that was not procedurally generated, but scanned in (years ago) from some powdered graphite + alcohol experiments (I’m not being glib, you literally mix the graphite powder with alcohol). The texture files were huge and this led to some problems. Every single frame of that cycling texture was a very zoomed-in portion of a duplicated enormous 600dpi smart object, and it was bogging down the .psd. I rasterized the smart objects thinking that would solve the problem, but the thing is – Photoshop often lets pixels outside the canvas hang around in case you need them. I eventually solved the issue by cutting and pasting every single layer, so that I was sure it was only saving on-canvas pixels.

When everything was ready to go, I exported all the frames as flat .pngs and ran some actions on them to tweak the colors with curves layers and gradient maps, then piled them back into a .psd (File > Scripts > Load Files into Stack…)

Then I exported it as a .gif (because this was a limited palette piece from the start, this part was pretty painless) and posted it to tumblr, but not before redrawing it in unicode

⟨Ϡ⍘Ϡ⦦⦦

(the most essential part of my artistic process)

In all this animation took about two weeks, but I was only working for half an hour to an hour every day, in-between more pressing projects – as a way to relax and have fun.

Feel free to download the animation .psd and poke around. Please note that it will only work with CS6 and up.

I hope this was simple enough to follow. Again, I really recommend Alex Grigg’s Photoshop tutorial, it taught me basically everything I know. This Richard Williams book is also a big deal. I hope more people give animation a shot and make weird gifs – it’s fun and informative.

4

as requested by anonymous! 

essentially this tutorial will cover how you go from a normal gif to one with an extended background (for lack of a better phrase?). it’s basically a gif with lots of empty space!

difficulty: low  //  time needed: slightly longer than making a regular gif.

here we go–

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