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CAROL WANTS YOU...

…to vote Carol Support Group for the audience award at Frameline Film Festival. Text S612 to 55333. Polls close 5pm PST♥️☎️♥️

Originally posted by alfred-borden

Rollin’ on a Mongoose

A surprise gift for @biduke-h, who invited to to help him last week to unlock the Endure Vidmaster Challenge achievement in Halo 3: ODST’s Firefight mode (Complete four full sets on Heroic Firefight with 4 players).

In this photo, I have Ben and @biduke-h‘s OC, Runa, riding together on a Mongoose. This was a achievement that I tried to get seven years ago, but failed and never went back.

With @biduke-h‘s help, I finally managed to unlock it after all these years, so I’d like to congratulate and thank you, @biduke-h, and enjoy the gift! :)

Rendered in Source Filmmaker and edited in Adobe Photoshop.

I do NOT own Halo! Copyright belongs to Microsoft Studios and 343 Industries!

The Catalyst [SFM/4K]

It’s been a little over a year now since Mirror’s Edge Catalsyt released. While I enjoyed it, I was a little disappointed by it, being a fan of the original game from 2008.

Nevertheless, I really like the Faith model, so I thought I try it out and made this quick poster. The background, a poster showcasing the city of Glass, was found on Google. Hope you guys like it!

Rendered in Source Filmmaker and edited in Adobe Photoshop.

I do NOT own Mirror’s Edge! Copyright belongs to Electronic Arts and D.I.C.E!

Scene Transitions

An important part of structuring your story in any format is the transition between scenes. When not handled properly, time and/or location jumps in a narrative can become disorientating and confusing, making it harder for the audience to keep up with the action. There are three important things to focus on when transitioning between scenes: where the first scene ends, where the second scene begins, and how to connect the two.

It’s important that each scene have closure. When you leave a scene, you need to know that the goal of that scene was reached. If you leave the scene too early, before you receive that closure, your audience will be left hanging, feeling unsatisfied and off balance. You need to ‘cut away’ when the scene comes to its natural end, when everything is understood and the audience is ready to move onto the next idea. If you leave the scene too late, it drags your story, and makes it feel like the scene is longer than it is.

As with the end of a scene, the beginning of a new scene must feel natural. If you have to backtrack immediately after starting your scene in order to explain whats going on, then it means you’re not starting at the beginning of the scene. You can sometimes get away with doing this, if the reflection is placed naturally in the writing, but you shouldn’t try and push your luck. If all of your scenes start with an immediate backpedal to explain where everyone is, how they got there, and when it takes place, then you need to go back and fix some things.

Information about the change in time and location are important to include. If you didn’t, then it would be impossible for the audience to tell if, when or how these changes occurred. The most widely accepted way of transitioning between scenes is to detail the things done by the characters to go from scene A to scene B. They can do so by showing the transition between locations (“They walked the distance to the theatre, laughing the whole way”), points in time (“hours passed as she sat reading in her favorite chair”), or combinations of the two (“they drove for days, the grassy hillsides of home growing into a looming mountain range”). The information in the transition must do everything to set up the new scene that’s starting.

I am going to use a segment from “These Shallow Graves” by Jennifer Donnelly as an example of what not to do when transitioning between scenes. In chapter thirty-four, a scene is ending where the protagonist and her love interest meet secretly during a ball and make a plan for her to sneak out later that evening. The scene ends on an angsty moment as they both watch her almost arranged fiance dancing with the competitor for his affections. Chapter thirty-five immediately begins with the two of them having met up and halfway to their destination. It is then explained how the protagonist had left the party early, snuck out, and made it to the meeting point.

Feels kinda jenky huh? Here’s how we could smooth this out.

Their plan for meeting up that evening involves the protagonist telling her uncle (who an attendee) that she is feeling faint and using that as an excuse to leave the ball early. This would make more sense as a place to end the scene as it signals the beginning of the transition between locations. When she sneaks out the house is a good place to officially begin the next scene, as it signals another change in locations. Because the time spent at the protagonist’s home is not important to the overall story (her waiting for everyone to fall asleep) this could serve as the transition between the scene of the first and the scene of the second meetings. The cab ride from her house to the meeting place is also its own small transition, and is a good place to reflect on past information without interfering with anything else going on (such as dialogue and bonding between love interests).

Remember! All of the important things to keep in mind when writing scene transitions are:
Know where to end a scene.
Know where to begin a scene.
Know how to connect the scenes.

youtube

I finished an animation for once.

Based on this lovely exchange: http://smiley-the-guy.tumblr.com/post/156773488555/local-dude-orders-a-burger-at-starbucks-featuring

instagram

Ah yes, another video of me doing the motion reference work for #BabyGroot. Believe it or not, I actually did three different versions of this dance at three different times. The first time was when I first wrote the scene, in my office st home, recorded by @simonlikes on his iPhone. That one was mostly so that I could remember the camera angles and camera movements I had in my head while writing than it did the actual dance. The second time was on set in Atlanta with a single camera and our visual effects team. That time it was doing the dance full out - there were some bits and pieces we used - but because Groot is moving and the camera was stable I was only able to travel for very short periods. And so we did it again, this time in Los Angeles, with many cameras lined down a long space so that I could actually do all the long walks and jumps Groot was doing. That’s when this is from. For those of you who’ve asked, bits of the dance were ideas of things I had in my head, or things designed for the already planned camera movies, but most of it was free form made up on the spot. The other question I’ve gotten asked a lot is whether or not I was just doing my regular dancing or was it in character. The answer is of course in character - I think you can see clearly in this video I’m trying to move my body that works for a little tree more than what I’d be dancing like in a nightclub in L.A. This is of course all courtesy of the visual effects company @framestore who turned this stuff into something magical, creating one of the most impressive single shots ever. #GuardiansoftheGalaxyVol2 is still out in theaters so go see it again this weekend! #gotgvol2 #GotGPicoftheDay #fbf #flashbackfriday #friday #instagood #filmmaking #movie #movies #dancing #love (at Los Angeles, California)

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