film: batb

Knowing my fat ass if I were Belle I would have tried a hell of a lot harder to eat all those foods during Be Our Guest

I mean look at this shit 

Bitch just grabbed a cherry 

“Try the grey stuff it’s delicious” Bitch please pass me the fork 

This scene is visually stunning, but my drunk ass would have climbed the table for some champagne  

Don’t even get me started with the live action version I MEAN LOOK AT THIS

Originally posted by olicity-i-believe-in-you

In summary I would basically look like this throughout the song 

Why “Beauty and the Beast” was actually pretty great:
  • the music is not good, it’s great
  • production design, costumes (even the freaking yellow dress which is actually quite gorgeous on camera), everything is truly beautiful and quite breathtaking at moments
  • the acting was surprisingly wonderful. it’s disney, it’ll be cheesy at moments—but for the most part, it was terrific
  • this is not a childish adaptation
  • when it gets dark, it gets DARK. 
  • g a s t o n
  • new songs! new character development! 
  • the cgi is not even that bad. in fact, there are moments when it’s pretty seamless. the practical sets and effects compensated for it, in my mind.
  • and when it’s wonky? you won’t care because you’ll be too busy smiling
  • there is some hilarious shit in this movie
  • the beast’s expressions are actually amazing; you can really see the actor moving beneath them 
  • T H E    M U S I C
  • you get to see little kids and adults all freaking out the whole time
  • SIR IAN MCKELLEN PLAYS A CLOCK AND IS AWESOME AT IT
  • emma watson will make your heart stop she is so beautiful
  • sneaky political/ethical gestures that made me cheer
  • this movie is so pure and we need that right now
  • and by the end? i just started laughing and crying—in excess joy. i couldn’t believe it. i’ve never been moved by a movie like that in my life.
  • it won’t please everybody but if you loved the original and if you are prepared to attempt to enjoy it for what it is—a colorful, painterly, vibrant adaptation of a beloved story—then go watch it.

okay but can we talk about the 4 biggest movies this week?

Kong: Skull Island

  • useful female characters who aren’t sexualized
  • no romance subplots
  • diverse cast
  • no racist, sexist, transphobic, or homophobic jokes

Beauty and the Beast

  • a diverse period piece (this almost never happens omg)
  • gay characters and men wearing makeup in a family movie
  • pro-gender equality message
  • did I mention there are GAY CHARACTERS IN A FAMILY MOVIE??

Logan

  • Spanish-speaking POC female lead
  • also she’s a badass
  • also she’s a kid
  • no offensive jokes yet again

Get Out

  • mostly Black cast
  • directly addresses racial issues in a unique way
  • diverse crew (including mixed-race director)

Two unproblematic action movies, a culturally-relevant, political horror movie, and a family movie that isn’t just a bunch of straight white people everywhere.  Am I dreaming?  We still have a long way to go but this is a great start.

5

“As we wanted to show a slight passage of time in costume we made some slight changes – Belle is wearing a jacket that was embroidered by hand in our workshop and is a collection of stylised images of different animals. She is wearing a red fichu and an apron with printed flowers which references French provencal style and is part of the small selection of additional things she wears during the montage sequence at the Castle.” — Jacqueline Durran

It worries me when people actually believe that Beauty and the Beast is about Stockholm Syndrome and/or abuse. Everyone is entitled to their own interpretation, for sure. But when people start shaming others for enjoying the tale, it becomes a problem. 

Let’s break it down:

Beauty and the Beast shows how Stockholm Syndrome works

Actually, Stockholm Syndrome is yet to be recognized as an actual mental disorder, and people who have been part of hostage situations have denied it.

Stockholm Syndrome involves adapting your actions to please a captor when you feel threatened. It is a survival mechanism. In this case, Belle never changes for the Beast, and instead challenges him every time.  

But Beast kidnapped and captured Belle in his castle. He is a captor

He didn’t kidnap her. Belle chose to take upon herself a penalty that fell on her father due to his trespassing. 

Also, let’s remember that we can’t analyze a film without taking its historical setting into account. The story takes place in a Royal background during the 18th Century,  when the justice system was nothing like ours.

As a result, Royalty -to which the Prince, who is now a Beast, belonged to- dealt with trespassers much differently than we do, as they believed their word to be the law. 

Yes, the Beast/the Prince is her captor. But only because he is punishing her for what he considers to be a transgression on her father’s part. Let’s remember: this is a character that lost his kingdom, and the only power he now has, has been reduced to the castle and what exists in it. Growing out of this mentality and what has been wrongly taught to him, is part of his character arc (and it’s also why it makes sense that an Enchantress would want to teach a lesson to a Prince and not someone like Gaston, since the entire kingdom depends on him).    

But he’s abusive

The Beast never insults or physically harms Belle. At most, he’s rude and demanding…in 2 scenes. Yes. When people talk about the Beast’s abuse in the animation, only two or three scenes where he’s yelling or smashing furniture are used to support the theory.

However:

1- The scenes (being rude to Belle on the way to her room, demanding Belle dines with him, and throwing her from the West Wing and smashing furniture) occur on the same day. The very same day he’s had to interact with another person for the 1st time in 10 years, after almost becoming a complete animal. There’s pent up anger, for sure. But never again do we see the Beast being either forceful or violent. On the contrary, he learns his way into gaining his human behavior back.

2- In each of the scenes, the animators made careful decisions to show the Beast’s instant regret. When analyzing a film, we can’t forget the visual cues that it gives us.

3-  Belle doesn’t fear him. Even after seeing him easily take on the wolves that attacked her (that is, at his most violent), she confronts him and calls him out on his rudeness. A scared person wouldn’t dare to do so. She’s an immovable force that the Beast doesn’t know how to deal with, not a victim.

4- We can’t choose to forget that the Beast sets her free, which is no small feat for someone who has been brought up in a royal background. 

But it glamorizes abusive relationships by making girls believe they can change men

No. Choices made by Linda Woolverton (script) and Howard Ashman (lyrics) focus on Belle and the Beast as outcasts, and forcing her to stay in the castle is a plot device to help the characters get to know each other (and, like I mentioned before, it’s justified by the messed up royal background of the Beast).

It doesn’t ‘glamorize’ an abusive relationship. When the Beast is rude and violent, Belle doesn’t take an interest in him and she actively rejects him. It’s only when the power balance shifts and they treat each other as equals, that the friendship and attraction begin.

The tale is more about outcasts finding solace in each other, than about a woman changing a man to fit her standards. Both Belle and the Beast change in some way. Both must look past each other’s appearance and behavior (both are stubborn and set on their ways) to find what is within. The fact that what is in there pleases them both is what makes the tale great. After all, Belle could have found another Gaston inside the Beast.

But in real life people don’t change for other people” 

In real life, people don’t turn into beasts and furniture. There are no curses or enchantments. We’re dealing with a fairy tale that shows us how the world should be, could be or we would want it to be. And if things didn’t work out for the better, there would be no story to tell.

Let’s never forget the striking difference between fiction and reality. And if you’re worried kids will get the wrong message, talk to them. Don’t blame it on the films or the stories.  

We can’t and shouldn’t judge a film on account of its validity in real life. In real life, most of us wouldn’t support vigilantism, yet we enjoy films like Batman or The Avengers without a hitch. In real life, we would probably reject terrorism, yet we enjoy Heath Ledger’s Joker (The Dark Knight) and Hugo Weaving’s V (V for Vendetta) despite the fact that both can be labeled as terrorists. 


I’ll be writing more about this soon, but for now, I truly hope people will take a closer look at a film before just glancing at the plot and thinking: “oh, this sounds too much like this other thing! It must be the same!”. 

Take the time to consider all the elements in a story before letting a Meme or a Tweet define how you see it. 

WHAT DO YOU MEAN WITH LE DUO DIDNT WIN “BEST DUO”?

ARE

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YOU

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FREAKING

KIDDING

ME

SERIOUSLY

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I

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MEAN

WOULD

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YOU

PLEASE

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LOOK

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AT

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THEM

THESE

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TWO

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ABSOLUTELY

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ADORABLE

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PERFECT

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AND

FUNNY

CUTIES

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BEST

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DUO

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AND

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BROMANCE

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EVER

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  • everyone: the prince's beast growl
  • me: the prince in full black swan makeup
and to everyone bitching about belle’s yellow gown:

i get it. i do. but in the words of my father (who was crying like a baby during most of the film): “people who say these things are just looking for something to pick on. there was probably not one person in that theater that could care less about what was wrong with it. they would have all said it was beautiful, and it was.”