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‘Power Rangers’ Star Ludi Lin Joins Jason Momoa In ‘Aquaman’
By Amanda N'Duka

Chinese actor Ludi Lin, who recently starred as the Black Ranger in Liongate’s Power Rangers reboot, has landed the role of Murk in Warner Bros’ James Wan-directed DC superhero film Aquaman. Jason Momoa is starring in the film, which WB recently pushed back from its original release date in October to December 21, 2018.

In the comics, Murk is the leader of the front-line army of Atlantis known as the Men-of-War and Aquaman’s trusted ally. Amber Heard, Patrick Wilson, Nicole Kidman, Willem Dafoe, Dolph Lundgren, Yahya Abdul-Mateen, and Temuera Morrison co-star.

Cannon Star Wars facts (not opinions)
  • The main series films are officially called “The Skywalker Saga”, meaning the Skywalkers are the most important part. If the planned Episodes X-XII actually happen this means one of two things: Kylo lives to carry on the line/there is another Skywalker among the main cast (most likely Rey in this case)
  • The newly added main characters are Rey, Finn, Poe, and Kylo. Those are the important characters.
  • Rey, Finn, and Poe are the “hero trio” if such a thing must exist. They are the good guys. They work for the Resistance, which from the perspective of the story are the heroes. All important to the continuation of the story
  • Kylo is the villain. He antagonizes the heroes, he is on the opposite side. That’s his role, still important but a different role than the hero
  • Finn didn’t murder anyone. In fact he explicitly didn’t in his first scene. 
  • Kylo did kill people. He murdered two (2) named characters in one movie.
  • Luke didn’t kill the younglings. That isn’t what happened, cannon isn’t lying to you, why would it do that
  • Luke has shown disdain for the “Old Jedi ways” in Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi when Obi and Yoda wanted him to abandon his friends for the greater good. They wanted him to give up his attachments but he didn’t and he was stronger for it. This fact helped defeat the Empire (the only reason I bring this up is why would he go back to the old Jedi code?)
  • Obi-Wan was a strict supporter of the Jedi Code, Anakin and Qui-Gon were his deepest and most important bonds. 
  • After Anakin turned to the dark side Obi dedicated his life to watching over Luke (Rebels literally had a scene where he sat in the desert watching Luke watch the sky)
  • Rey and Finn form a strong bond immediately. JJ Abrams confirms attraction (jediknightreys has the sourse on that)
  • There is one kiss in Force Awakens and it is Rey kissing Finn’s forehead
  • The TFA script explicitly states Luke knows who Rey is  
  • All of the scenes in Rey’s vision at Maz’s castle specifically relate to one or more Skywalkers: the Cloud City duel between luke and vader, Luke in shadow with R2, Knights of Ren massacre, Kylo in the woods. This leaves Rey being left on Jakku, which is this only one without a currently CONFIRMED Skywalker shown
  • The Skywalker family lightsaber flies by a currently CONFIRMED member of the Skywalker clan to fly into the hands of a character looking for her family
  • Rey dreams of Luke Skywalker’s exact location, even before the events of the film
  • Being able to wield a lightsaber in battle is a sign of Force sensitivity. (just saying)

tricornking  asked:

Quick question re Crimson Peak: I have yet to see it, and while I've heard that it's a gold modern gothic horror, I've also heard that it is one of del Toro's weaker films. Do you have any thoughts on it that could recommend the movie for me?

  • costumes
  • fucking PRODUCTION VALUES
  • mother SHIT THE DESIGN OF THIS MOVIE IS FLAWLESS
  • ghosts are done with like 90% practical effects and damn do I love a ghost that feels corporeal
  • complex characters
  • LUCILLE SHARPE HOLY FUCK JESSICA CHASTAIN
  • it’s not a horror movie it’s a gothic romance and a feminist deconstruction of the gothic romance genre at that
  • it pays glorious homage to the gothic romance genre while being fresh and interesting 
  • like there’s the scene where you’re thinking “oh great, the helpless damsel being rescued by her dashing hero” BUT NO, OHH NO MY MAN GUILLERMO FLIPS IT ON ITS HEAD. NOT ONLY DOES SHE SAVE THE HERO, SHE SAVES HERSELF
  • like it openly steps away from some of the grosser tropes of the genre while still retaining all the things that make the genre interesting and distinctive in the first place, and then manages to fashion something entirely unique
  • the new world/old world divide and how the aristocratic sharpes can’t move on and the commentary on those fucked up values
  • and there’s the question of how child abuse can twist a person 
  • the moral ambiguity of the characters is really sublime because you can pity them and understand what they did while still being repulsed by them
  • did I mention lucille sharpe
  • the symbolism and metaphors wreathing this movie hnnngh
  • I mean yes I would agree that Crimson Peak is not as strong as my man guillermo’s spanish films but it is still an extraordinary work of art that I never get tired of looking at
  • plus if you like the devil’s backbone, his treatment of ghosts - or his philosophy behind them - is pretty much the same in CP
  • holy shit I love this movie
  • I don’t care what anyone else thinks, I’m this close to getting a moth or the sharpe coat of arms tattooed on my ass

“You must be imaginative; strong-hearted. You must try things that may not work. And you must not let anyone define your limits because of where you come from. Your only limit is your soul.” - Auguste Gusteau

Ratatouille, my most favorite Pixar movie, is 10 years old today. I don’t think I could ever properly describe how much this movie means to me or how much it has inspired me. I would not be the artist I am today if it weren’t for this film. it pushed me to draw beyond my limitations and become a better artist - not to prove anything, but because “anyone can”, as is stated throughout the film.

Taron Egerton, Golden Boy

Action, explosions and impeccable tailoring, the new Kingsman film has it all. Following the worldwide success of the first film of the franchise, Kingsman: The Golden Circle is set to hit the big screens this September and packs a star-studded cast. Taron Egerton talks about the excitement of returning to the role of Eggsy for the sequel, his on-screen love interest and what to expect for the highly anticipated release.

Where is Eggsy when we pick up with him?

We meet Eggsy an undisclosed amount of time after the first [film]. But you can see in his mews house that there are three additional Sun headlines on the wall, indicating that he’s done a handful of missions on his own. And he is now going steady, to use a very 1950s term, with – shock horror – the Swedish princess from the first movie. Love blossomed in an unusual place. He’s trying to juggle the lifestyle of being a Kingsman and a full-time spy with also trying to nurture a blossoming relationship with a person who he really loves. He’s basically the same guy, just with a really important job.

He still has those rough edges?

Oh, the rough edges haven’t been sanded off. Eggsy still fucks up. That’s essential for the audience to have a window into the movie, to experience it through his eyes. He still has to escape through a sewer and emerge covered in shit. That’s not Harry Hart. That’s Eggsy. If we’d started the movie with Eggsy being Harry Hart, he wouldn’t have anywhere to go. He’s the rough-around-the-edges lad. We even see him return to an adidas hoodie – that’s who he is on his downtime.

This is your third film now with Matthew Vaughn, who also produced Eddie The Eagle. You clearly work well together – were you in contact with him as he pulled the movie together?

For the whole time he was writing, he always calls and says ideas. There is a real big kid in Matthew. When he has an idea he’s excited about he wants to share it. Just when you think you have a handle on Matthew, who he is and how his creative brain works, he comes in with something else which is really fucking clever. On a daily basis, it’s something I could never have thought of.

The first movie was your first time on a movie set. Did it feel easier this time?

On the first one I thought Matthew could fire me at any moment. I was a bit more tight-lipped and reverential. Now I give as good as I get. It felt easier in that I’ve spent far more time on film sets, and felt more certain of myself and how I function within a film set and this world I now occupy. In other senses, Matthew kept calling it the tough second album, and it is. People shout ‘Eggsy!’ at me in the street sometimes, and that’s quite a thing to reconcile yourself with, that you’re coming back and playing the same role again, and people have a level of expectation from you. They want the same thing again, but they also want it to be new and exciting. Kingsman has totally changed my life, so coming back, the overriding emotion was excitement, and real anticipation. The script was great, and it’s a really great story. I was so excited, and to be doing a sequel to your first film within four years of coming out of drama school, I am the luckiest man on the planet.

Have you changed your approach to the character?

On the first, I was constantly thinking about the accent and it doesn’t cross my mind now. He’s very much a part of me. I don’t think about it for a second now. I’ve played this character from his inception and I feel secure.

The best-kept secret in movies – that Colin Firth is back as Harry Hart – is now out. So what can you say about Eggsy’s relationship with Harry in this movie?

Well… we were on the same set, and we are friends and I love his company, and it was really nice to revisit a job well done. There were a lot of ways Matthew could have gone with the sequel, but in my mind, there was no doubt. I’m not sure how far the movie goes without that Harry and Eggsy relationship. That dynamic, and riffing on that dynamic, is the beating heart of the movie.

Has the relationship changed?

When they are reunited, it’s lovely. It’s very affecting and they’re pleased to see each other. But for undisclosed reasons, a tension grows in their relationship. That’s enormously fun and an interesting dynamic. When Harry and Eggsy’s relationship came to its untimely end in the first one, they weren’t on good terms. It’s quite sad. Eggsy hasn’t dealt with the situation particularly well. So in this movie you expect a reconciliation and you get it, but because of other facts it’s not always harmonious. Matthew knows that’s the key. You’ve got all the guns and fighting and that makes it brilliant, but for me it’s about Harry and Eggsy.

Early in the film, an attack on Kingsman has huge ramifications for Eggsy. What are those ramifications?

What it means for Eggsy is he was disenfranchised at the start of the first one, and aimless and not content. This wacky world he becomes involved with gives him direction and purpose, so to dash it to smithereens at the top end of this second episode is mad. Eggsy doesn’t really know what the hell to do. Sometimes sequels don’t work. This works because we get a reset. Everything was OK, and now it’s not again.

The big new additions to the film are the Statesmen, the American equivalent of Kingsmen, who Eggsy and Merlin discover in the wake of the attack on their own organisation. What can you say about these new arrivals?

The Kingsmen make their money through tailoring and that’s their front, but it’s more limited in terms of reward and finances than selling booze. The Statesmen are a level up. We thought our jet was good, but theirs is a fucking jet. You can see Eggsy being wide-eyed with wonder again.

The cast Vaughn has assembled for this movie is astonishing.

It’s amazing. One minute you’re working in Peacocks and then all of a sudden you’re sat at a table with Jeff Bridges, Colin Firth, Channing Tatum and Halle Berry! It’s a weird thing to be part of. They’re such great characters and so animated and larger than life and played by such great performers.

What’s the relationship like between Eggsy and the Statesmen?

I think to begin with it’s one of mistrust. These organisations aren’t aware of each other. They’re only supposed to become aware of each other in the event of a serious disaster. Eggsy and Merlin find themselves face to face with Agent Tequila, and have a fight… I don’t recommend fighting Channing Tatum. He’s a dancer, but that guy is like an ox. I had a few sore fingers after that.

Talk us through the Statesmen.

Ginger (played by Halle Berry) is the equivalent of Merlin. She’s very clever and you might describe her as bookish, she’s a quieter character. And then there’s Channing Tatum, who has a bit of bravado and is butch and manly. He’s quite gung-ho. He likes his weekend parties. He ends up in stasis, having taken some sort of illicit substance. Jeff as Champagne is really cool. He’s an alcoholic who doesn’t drink, but is forever swilling and spitting whiskey, or he sniffs the whiskey as he’s talking and trying to figure [stuff] out. Then there’s Pedro Pascal, who plays agent Whiskey, and he is a kind of seasoned veteran, their top field agent, who takes me under his wing. For a little while, it begins to feel like he might be a new mentor figure for Eggsy in the absence of Harry Hart, who is not quite what he once was. But you also get the sense that Whiskey might be a little reckless, and a little cold.

And, of course, there’s Julianne Moore as the villain of the piece, Poppy.

She has a dastardly plot that’s every bit as chilling as Valentine’s plot from the first movie. That’s thematic of these two films. There’s a very cold world in which you get what Valentine was saying about global warming. You can also sort of see where Poppy is coming from, depending on how conservative you are. But Julianne is lovely. She’s a children’s author as well and heard that I had two young sisters and she sent some of her books. She’s really great in the movie, really disturbing and saccharine and rotten to the core. The smile never reaches the eyes.

The first film pushed the envelope with its R-rated tone, exploding heads and stylish violence. Does the second follow that up?

You’re not going to be leaving the cinema feeling like Matthew played it safe this time. It takes a character like Matthew’s to be as resolute and uncompromising as that, in the face of all the pressures that come when it’s a commercially viable property. If you call the first one provocative, you’d call this one a punch in the face.

So it’s a movie that may ruffle feathers.

I think it may ruffle feathers more than the first one ruffled feathers.

This is the interview and photos that appeared in M2 Magazine