fighting ableism

if you were previously homophobic but realize you were wrong: that’s ok, u are learning
if you are struggling with internalized misogyny: that’s ok too, keep fighting to overcome the sexism that society perpetuates
if you were accidentally trans phobic but are fixing it: great, we need everyone on our side
if at any point u were wrong and are trying to fix it: we accept you and we were all there. keep working to be a good person

since it’s april, please don’t support autism speaks, an organization that dehumanizes and speaks over autistic people. consider supporting asan or the autistic women’s network instead, which are autistic-run and fight anti-autistic ableism instead of promoting it.

I picture all of Caboose’s sisters as crazy competent geniuses in their respective fields. One’s a pro wrestler who is like, buff as all hell. Another is an expert in A.I tech. One has the best hair salon on the entire moon. The eldest is on of the best pilots the USNC has ever seen (cough, niner, cough).

There is one thing that brings them all together though. The first is that they dote on their baby brother like crazy, cus once the youngest, always the youngest. The second is that there is a “talk shit get hit” policy for ableist comments, because Caboose was always different and while he could deal with his bullies, he shouldn’t have to. 

Some asshole: “What a absolute *insert ableist word of choice here*”

5′1 Hair Salon Sister, appears stage left with a still hot hair straightener. “WHAT THE FUCK DID YOU SAY ABOUT MIKEY!”

Caboose: Oh no.

Hair Salon Sister: “I HOPE YOU’RE NOT ATTATCHED TO YOUR SHITTY UNDERCUT CUS YOU’RE ABOUT TO BE BALD.”

Everyone watches in awe.

being able to say “fuck big pharma” and avoid taking prescription medications in lieu of alternative medicine is a privilege

being mentally or physically healthy enough to boycott pharmaceuticals is a huge fucking privilege so please get off your high horse when shaming chronically ill, mentally ill, and disabled people for the medications they need to take in order to function

let’s criticize the institution rather than the people who need to take part in it in order to survive

thescottishmcrdragon  asked:

Speaking about Autistic! Nico..... how does he deal with the jerkbutts that are like "lol autism, must mean you're a *insert slur starting with r here*"

it used to really bother him like, “oh cool guess people really do hate me : )  : )  : ) good to know that i can never tell anyone im autistic out of fear of judgement :-)” BUT now that hes a Big Boi™ and has gone through Some Deep Shit (read: tartarus, bianca, Everything Else) he kinda. Doesnt Give A Singular Heck. he is now Always Ready To Stab A Neurotypical with his Angsty Emo Death Sword ™™™™™

anonymous asked:

Can any disabled person call themselves a cripple punk as an endearing term, or is it only those who need mobility devices? I have an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and use oxegyn sometimes but I was wondering if It were appropriate to call myself that lol

This is from Urban Dictionary:

[ Cripple Punk:

(also known as cpunk) A movement that is exclusively by the physically disabled for the physically disabled, started on tumblr. It’s about rejecting pity, inspiration porn, & all other forms of ableism. It ejects the “good cripple” mythos. Cripple Punk is here for the bitter cripple, the uninspirational cripple, the smoking cripple, the drinking cripple, the addict cripple, the cripple who hasn’t “tried everything”. Cripple Punk fights internalized ableism & fully supports those struggling with it. It respects intersections of race, culture, gender, sexual/romantic orientation, size, intersex status, mental illness/neuroatypical status, survivor status, etc. Cripple Punk does not pander to the able bodied.
“rules”:
-cripple punk is not conditional on things like mobility aids & “functioning levels”
-always listen to those w/ different physical disabilities & different intersections than yourself. do not speak over them
-disabled people do not need to personally identify w/ the words “cripple” or “punk” individually to be a part of cripple punk
-able bodied people wishing to spread the message may only ever amplify the voices of the disabled
-able bodied people may never use uncensored slurs themselves but never censor our language
-able bodied people must always tag things like reblogs with “i’m able bodied”

-physically disabled people wanting to be a part of the movement who are uncomfortable using the slur may refer to it as “cpunk” ]

(Also it was coined by @crpl-pnk)

Watch on lonbonlonlon.tumblr.com

Stop comparing your able-body to disabled bodies.
Those will minor illnesses, stop treating those who have severe illnesses like we aren’t trying. Just because you have an illness and can work, etc., doesn’t mean everyone with illnesses can.

Not everyone is able to do the things YOU do. 

#fightingableism 

People throw around the term mentally ill like it's a synonym for violence. "oh he shot people, he must've been mentally ill" "she killed her husband? Must be mentally ill" Imagine if someone said that but instead of mentally ill they said gay. "Oh he shot a bunch of people he must be gay" "killed her husband must be gay". Plain and obvious homophobia right there right? People with a mental illness are no more likely to commit a crime of any kind than someone without a mental illness, including violent crimes. We are more likely to be the victims of crimes then commit them. Stop using mentally ill as a synonym for violence!

~Scarlet

In light of everything going on...

Could people, anyone capable of doing so, please do something every single time you see someone describe ableism as being about a list of words you are supposed to say and a list of words you’re not supposed to say?

Ableism is about going to a hospital and getting told by doctors that you’d be better off going home and dying than getting a feeding tube.

Ableism is about going to get SSI and getting told that if you can blog (or do some other random thing that is not gainful employment and will never be), you can work for gainful employment.

Ableism is about your own family believing you’re lazy or exaggerating or faking because you don’t seem like their idea of what a disabled person is (young white guy in a wheelchair from paraplegia, usually – who are actually usually among the more privileged and able to work of disabled people, not that they have it easy by any means, especially since able to work doesn’t mean able to get hired in an ableist workforce).

Ableism is about valuing people based on what we can do, rather than valuing people because we exist.

Ableism is about drawing a line past which people don’t count as disabled anymore, they just count as not even people, and not worth protecting.

Ableism is about there being entire books where people think it’s legitimate to debate whether people with intellectual or other cognitive or developmental disabilities (those are three totally different but overlapping categories, just so you’re aware) count as persons or not.  Both “philosophically” and under law.  Google Peter Singer if you don’t believe me (he also doesn’t think newborns are persons, but everyone loves him because he supports animal rights – by bringing down disabled human beings in the process, and everyone knows – because of ableism, of course – that disabled human beings don’t matter anyway, not as much as animals).

Ableism is not – at least not mostly – about whether ‘stupid’ is a slur.  It’s just not.  And it infuriates me both when disabled people treat it primarily that way, and when nondisabled people treat it primarily that way.  

Because when you do a serious discussion of racism, and then classism, and then sexism, and transphobia, and transmisogyny, and homophobia, and biphobia, and every other kind of oppression you can think of, large and small, and you give them in-depth coverage… and then you come to ableism.  And it’s always last.  And it’s always a footnote to all the other kinds of oppression.  And the footnote always reads “And ableism… don’t say stupid, or idiot, instead, say these other words that don’t actually form an adequate replacement for those first words at all.”  

Which diminishes the understanding of the power of actual ableist slurs such as retard (hint: a slur carries with it as part of the meaning, that the person being described by the slur is not a real person – an insult like ‘stupid’ can be used in an ableist or non-ableist way but is not necessarily a slur even when it’s ableist). And it also diminishes the understanding of what ableism actually is, by not taking seriously the fact that ableism kills people.  

And even this act of always putting ableism last, always treating it as less serious or possibly not even a real ism at all (possibly “political correctness gone amok”, possibly “(eyeroll) yet another group of people wanting to claim they’re oppressed and really stealing the idea of oppression from real oppressed people like people of color and taking their ideas and successes without crediting them at all”, however it’s phrased… that is one of the worst things about ableism in circles that claim to want to deal with oppression in all its forms.  Because it basically throws us to the wolves while claiming there are no wolves to throw us to and that we aren’t really dying in huge numbers everywhere and so forth.  There are ways in which ableism becomes worse, more deadly, because of being diminished in this way by all the “serious” anti-oppression people.

So – I don’t care if you call what you do social justice or anti-oppression or anything else.  I don’t care if you’re part of those circles or not.  I don’t care if you use ideas from those circles or not.  I just don’t care.  All I care about is that you take ableism seriously and that you take the danger disabled people are in right now seriously and part of taking it seriously is making sure that people understand it’s not about what words are politically correct or politically incorrect at this particular moment in time when it comes to disability.  

Because disabled people are often the first to die – or among the first – in situations like this. And this is not an accident.  It is because the people with power know that a lot of people don’t give a rat’s ass what happens to us, whether on the right or on the left.  It’s because they know that you don’t take our oppression seriously.  It’s because they know that our deaths will be considered inevitable.  Have you ever considered it inevitable that disabled people and old people end up in nursing homes, group homes, developmental centers, psych wards, and other institutional settings? – sad, maybe, tragic even, but inevitable consequences of disability?  Because that’s the same kind of thinking that makes our deaths inevitable.  (By the way, nursing homes are the cause of death for a lot of us, but our disability gets blamed instead and this is all normalized so much you probably can’t even see it.)  Have you ever considered it inevitable that disabled people contemplate suicide, and never thought it might be the result of the same forces that cause other oppressed people to contemplate suicide?  Have you ever responded almost reflexively to disabled people’s suicidal thoughts by saying that we ought to have the right to kill ourselves easily and painlessly (when you’d never say the same of, say, queer teenagers), without even thinking that maybe most of the time we’re suicidal for the same reason queer teenagers often are?  Have you ever thought that when we don’t get SSI and die on the streets, that’s just…. unfortunate but sort of inevitable?  That basically our deaths however and whenever they happen are unfortunate but inevitable consequences of being disabled, and you’ve never even thought of the way ableism plays both into our deaths themselves and into your own thoughts about them?

Because that’s why you need to get people to take ableism seriously immediately.  And that’s why I’ve always been infuriated by people not taking ableism seriously.  Because I’ve been that person in that hospital room being told by doctors that I would do better off to go home and die of a totally preventable pneumonia or starvation, rather than get the combination of feeding tubes that would prevent both?  

Oh and by the way – don’t quote me statistics about aspiration pneumonia and feeding tubes unless you know my exact disability, the exact cause of the aspiration pneumonia, and the exact configuration and type of feeding tubes I use and exactly how I use them.  I know that as a general rule feeding tubes don’t prevent aspiration and may even cause it, but in my particular circumstances that doesn’t apply.  There are dozens of reasons for feeding tubes, dozens of types of feeding tubes, and if you don’t understand all of this in-depth you have no basis for commenting.  I went from getting aspiration pneumonia seven times in the first few months of a year, to getting it once or twice a year at most, instantly, with the right combination of feeding tubes.  And I gained back roughly half of the 75 pounds I’d lost rapidly as a result of my stomach disorder.  

And I’m happy, and I’m fucking alive, which is more than I expected by now.  I didn’t expect to hit 34 or 35, and I’m now 36.  I might even eventually hit old age at this point, who knows.  But however long I lived, I deserved a chance to be alive.  And it took a lot of people calling the hospital and demanding I get treated right, to even get the feeding tube.  They couldn’t deny it to me – because I needed it – so they just tried every trick they knew to talk me out of agreeing to it.  After tumblr and other places resulted in enough phone calls to the hospital, I got my tube the next day, although my problems with ableism in that hospital were and remain far from over and the circumstances of getting the tube and the aftermath were something out of a nightmare scenario.  Not because they had to be, but because they could get away with it, because ableism is everywhere and practically unacknowledged by just about everyone, including especially the people who supposedly care the most about disabled people (family, caregivers, “helping professionals”, anti-oppression people, etc).

Anyway, this has gotten into a long enough rant I’ll be surprised if you could read this far – I probably couldn’t (I write better than I read). But hopefully you get the message.  Right now is a time when disabled Americans, especially those of us facing other forms of oppression (ever try to get proper medical care as a queer, genderless and visibly gender-atypical, poor person with developmental disabilities? …yeah) need people fighting ableism more than ever.  And that doesn’t mean tacking up a list of words that everyone can say instead of ‘stupid’.  And treating it like it does, is part of the problem that leads to us dying in circumstances like these.

like. dude. listen. you cant put shit out in the world without at least some semblance of the awareness that, wow, huh, maybe that’s actually regurgitating a really harmful idea!! maybe i should look deeper into my own biases and examine why theyre there!!! ethics 101!!

theres this super fucking pervasive idea that disabled people–in this case, let’s say particularly blind people–are the victims of some horrible tragedy. fight ableism because “that could be you one day!! [shudder]”, or ditch the fighting ableism completely like most people. that could be you one day. oh god. how terrifying. imagine a life like that!

when i went blind i spent like a week in the hospital bingeing everything on netflix that had audio description (at the time this was: daredevil, criminal minds, sherlock bbc, and glee) and getting an alarming number of blood draws. it was pretty chill. i didnt really have my official freakout until a couple weeks later, after…wait for it…a professor failed me rather than deal with the inaccessibility in her own coursework and told me i should drop out, because academia was no place for someone like me.

i was pissed at first. im still pissed. meet me in the fucking pit, laurie, the 504 coordinator can be our referee.

but after a little while it set in that, oh right, i can’t read. oh right, i can’t currently cross the street on my own. on right, i cant, i cant, i cant. everything that everyone had ever said was such an awful fate to be subjected to sunk in all at once and i think i ended up crying over not being able to finish dragon age: inquisition.

i dont even like dragon age.

it took like…..a while……..to remember that life has intrinsic value. that theres nothing actually all that important about being sighted. there are some things i cant do anymore but that isnt the end of the world, and like, hell, there are some perks, too! i never have to see benedict cumberbatch’s face ever again, for one.

i got through my little breakdown pretty quickly, and into a stage in my life where my blindness was something that defined me – and that that wasnt a bad thing. i know im lucky for that. i know if i werent already a cr*p it probably would have been a lot harder. i know other people still struggle with the idea that they’re useless, or that their existence is tragic. i have those moments too.

and like, spoiler alert, if y'all fuckers and your “isnt it so sad that matt doesnt know what foggy looks like”, [something something inaccessible disney channel cartoon], etc etc thought you werent involved here, you thought wrong. those ideas are part of the problem. you are part of the problem. maybe you dont think that its a big deal because you’re not necessarily espousing eugenics (side-eyeing u transhumanists real fuckin hard rn), but it is. casual ableism like that, like it’s a no-brainer, of course blindness is terrible, of course it’s something to fear, of course… that has an impact.

grow the fuck up. think critically about the kind of shit youre putting into the world. be better

i am not a person with a disability, i am a disabled person.

im in the middle of writing a massive essay as to why this is better, i want to make it clear that my illness/disability is so pervasive that it affects every aspect of my life, it has given me new insights and understandings, fighting against ableism has helped define me.

so dont take that away from me, for so long people have tried to avoid saying the word disability by using things like ‘hanicapable’ or ‘differently abled’ or just talking around it

just. fucking. say. it.

to say that i am a person ‘despite my illness/disability’ denies me an important part of who i am, to say that you don’t see disability or that you ‘look beyond it’ denies my struggles

i dont expect you to understand, i want you to listen and Just. Fucking. Say. It.

anonymous asked:

Posting random characters who may or may not have autism helps no one. It's a misrepresentation of the disorder, it gives people false hope that one of these character will be relatable for them, and it's disrespectful to the authors whose creations you are judging and changing. You wouldn't start something like this about celebrities– don't our fiction friends deserve the same respect?

I was debating on whether or not to even deign to answer this ask but I decided that I’m in a fairly good mood rather than an apathetic one so I hope you enjoy!

There will be no TL;DR because if you’re going to send asks like this, then you are going to READ.


“Posting random characters who may or may not have autism helps no one.” To assume this, you think that I’M solely the one posting them? Lemme tell you that there are over 70 characters currently in my ask box that I haven’t had the spoons to get to. Here’s a screenshot:

I don’t post these. Autistic people do. I just queue them. I’m merely the proxy for these people.

I have well over 1000 followers by now, almost all of which are autistic or suspecting they are. So to say that it doesn’t help anyone is false. It helps the people of the autistic community - and at times it even helps the people of the allistic (non-autistic) community.

I’ve gotten asks from allistics who follow saying that they love this blog because it helps fight their internalized ableism. I’ve also gotten asks from autistic people saying how much they love it because they love characters to relate to. It’s not a matter of “false hope” and wishing a character is autistic, but it’s more or less wanting to find characters in media to relate to. Those bold things are links btw please read them if you really don’t believe that it doesn’t help people.

Along with that, blogs like this do help because it gives people a chance to be able to show off their headcanons in a safe and anonymous way without the fear of getting death threats. Do you know how many autistic people get death threats for merely existing let alone showing their headcanons regarding autism? Tons. I know I get death threats on my main all the time for merely being autistic.

And yet, allistic people love when people throw gender and sexuality headcanons onto characters (especially to either ship or to fetishize - two different things I want to make that clear). So why can’t we autistic people do it for something that’s completely harmless and just for wanting to relate to characters?

So yeah it does help us. It helps both autistic and allistic (non-autistic) people. 


“It’s a misrepresentation of the disorder,” no it isn’t. Trust me my buddy it isn’t. It isn’t misrepresentation of the disorder at all when you have autistic people submitting these characters that they (AS AUTISTIC PEOPLE) relate to. Sometimes they even give full detailed paragraphs of explanations as to why the character can possibly be autistic.

It’s not misrepresentation for a minority to want to represent their respective group.

It WOULD, however, be misrepresentation if I and everyone submitting these characters were not autistic. However, 99% of my followers are autistic so yeah sorry but it’s not “misrepresentation” for minorities to want to represent their own fucking group. Anyways, moving on…


“…it gives people false hope that one of these character will be relatable for them,” so you’re saying that we can’t even hope? You’re saying that autistic people can’t even fucking dream that we get canon autistic characters (of which barely exist)?

You’re literally saying that autistic people can’t even have hope.

YOU ARE LITERALLY SAYING THAT AUTISTIC PEOPLE CANT EVEN HAVE HOPE.

And y’know if you read the links I put in earlier about autistic people (and allistic people) finding blogs like this very nice to be able to relate to characters then hm well you’re wrong. Again. But assuming you aren’t going to read them and just skip over this like some prick, allow me to quote an ask I got not too long ago.

“…I’m a pretty new diagnosis, and honestly, I adore this blog, being able to see people who might be like me, and especially finding characters I relate to that people HC as autistic, it’s really really validating. So thank you.”

So hmm I guess you’re just wrong there. You see, yes that is just one ask, but there’s a reason why so many autistic people submit and follow this blog. It’s so they can relate to characters.

It’s so they can have hope.

Of which you apparently don’t even want autistic people to have.

So thank you for saying that we can’t even hope for a better future.


“And it’s disrespectful to the authors whose creations you are judging and changing,” LIKE PEOPLE DON’T ALREADY TAKE CANON CISHET CHARACTERS AND HEADCANON THEM AS LGBT+ FOR “SHIPS” AND SHIT.

So you’re telling me that someone can take a canon cishet character and then proceed to draw them as a part of the LGBT+ community for shipping, but then if we autistic people seek actual relation to a character by a harmless headcanon, that it’s suddenly bad? Despite the fact that shippers do the exact same thing? Just a bit differently?

Which, I’m all for shippers and people headcanoning or drawing/writing canon cishet characters as LGBT+ for Teh Ships™ or to feel represented (assuming they themselves as shippers are LGBT+).

But the main point is that you’re contradicting your own rhetoric and beliefs without even having to mention the other half of the argument. You’re nothing but an ableist hypocrite.


And finally… the part that REALLY got me in all of this. The part that made me literally sit back and wonder if you were a troll or not.

“You wouldn’t start something like this about celebrities– don’t our fiction friends deserve the same respect?”

Celebrities are literally real people.

Fictional characters are FICTIONAL. They’re not real in the slightest.

And if you’re fictionkin or a fictive or whatever, then it still doesn’t count because these are fictional characters from THEIR respective media. No one is saying that YOU (as that character assuming you’re fictionkin or a fictive) are autistic lmao.

Anon, if you’re fictionkin or a fictive, then maybe stop thinking things are all about you for once? And consider that maybe another fictive or fictionkin of that character is autistic.

Oppression Olympics

I hate when inclustionists say “homophobia and transphobia aren’t the only types of oppression! This isn’t the oppression olympics!” Yes, obviously not. There’s sexism, ableism, racism, etc. However the LGBTPN community is here to fight transphobia and homophobia specifically. Just as people within disabled communities are there to fight ableism.

Sometimes different identities intersect in the way they’re oppressed. For example I’m disabled, female aligned (obviously,) lesbian so for me my sexualization or desexualization by others is often the product of one or more of these identities. So I find myself most at home in places that specifically address that unique intersection of those parts of myself. I don’t go out and demand disabilities or whatever be included under the LGBTPN label.

Unlike with asexuality there are widespread religious and government institutions specifically targeting people in homophobic and transphobic ways. These are part of the culture in which we live. The same thing goes for racism, sexism, etc. These oppressive systems have often attempted to control and judge how marginalized people express their romantic and sexual desires or lack thereof.

Even privileged people who exhibit common traits of these groups may find some backlash. Like cishet men who are feminine being treated poorly due to the way “girly” behavior under sexism implies this behavior is weak and men shouldn’t be, homophobia wrongly enforces that it is automatically a sign of being gay and therefore bad, along with transphobia and racism often coming into play. The cishet man is not actually being oppressed specifically for being a feminine cishet man, but he is facing discrimination because of these pre-existing forms of oppression.

In this way aphobia does not stand alone as an axis of oppression. Since as stated before is lacks any wide spread effort to target it specifically. Cishet aces would have their time better put to use by doing things to combat how these already existing oppressive structures effect their ace identity.

For example if you are a cishet ace man who is told he’s not masculine enough because he’s not in to sex? Well that’s toxic masculinity. It’s something directly tied to sexism not asexuality and can effect ace and non-ace men (like those who experience sexual attraction but don’t act on it due to trauma, religious beliefs, etc.) equally. Instead of trying to force your way into the LGBTPN community go to the root of the problem and fight the sexist structures that demand you be stereotypically hyper-masculine.

I recently sucked it up and got a wheelchair (from a thrift store) on a trip with my friends so I could still have fun even if we ended up having to walk long distances. I can’t walk very far without my hips popping out of place, but the energy I saved with the chair made it possible for me to go to my first club and only have to use my cane! I was really excited and the wheelchair made everything so much more enjoyable and easy since none of us had to worry about what would happen if I just suddenly couldn’t walk anymore while we were two miles from the train station. I’m still fighting all my internalized ableism, especially when people see me stand even briefly and immediately interrogate me on it, but I’m still happy I got it!