fieldworkers

Dig Diary, March 10, 2017:

It is very hot in Luxor right now, so the team often takes a break under the marquee that the Hopkins University team has loaned us (thank you, Betsy!). From left to right are Dr. Jacobus van Dijk of Groningen, who is studying the Sakhmet statues and their epithets with me; our senior Egyptian inspector, Mme Shemaa Mahmoud Ahmed; our second inspector, Mr. Yusuf Mohamed Ahmed; and me. Mary McKercher, of course, is behind the camera as usual.

While we’re not excavating this year (the season is too short), we are carrying out a few useful, small projects. First, at the request of the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA) we began on March 4 to cut back the reeds that have once again taken over the northern ends of the sacred lake, particularly on the east side. You can see how thick and tall they have grown in the past year.

Our second project is to clean off the dirt that has accumulated over the past 35 years or so on a Ramesses II doorjamb that we discovered lying on what’s left of the mud brick core of Temple A’s 2nd Pylon. We’ll build a small wall around it to prevent further encroachment. We decided to remove the large undecorated block standing beside it because it obscured a re-used relief in the pylon’s stone facing.

This was no easy task as the rock is not only heavy but awkwardly shaped. However, our workers were able to get it up and out fairly quickly; they do this kind of thing all the time. We admire both their strength and their skill.

To our surprise, we found that the bottom of the Ramesses II block, which we had never cleared, was also decorated! The way the block is lying, the “new” scene, probably from the east face of the 25th Dynasty pylon, is upside down. Seen right side up here, it consists of the crowns of 2 facing figures and several columns of text. The tall plumes on the right probably belong to Amun, and the plumes and sun disk are probably a king. Unfortunately no names are preserved.

You are looking southeast at Temple A’s 2nd Pylon, built in Dynasty 25. The blocks came almost entirely from earlier monuments, including the Ramesses III temple southwest of the sacred lake, which was no longer in use. The reliefs and sculptures were split apart when necessary and their rear surfaces smoothed to form the face of the pylon. This is most obvious in the pylon’s north wing (bottom of picture) where the decay of the mud brick core has made the blocks more visible. The south wing seems to have been built entirely of stone.

Here’s a more detailed view of the inner side of the east facing. The two torsos and upside down head came from the Ramesses III temple. Other reliefs date from earlier in the New Kingdom. The relief on the left, by the way, is the one that was partially hidden by the block we moved.

At the end of a long, hot day, we sit on our hotel balcony and watch the sun set. One evening recently, this enormous flock of ibises flew by heading north. There must have been hundreds altogether.

At the end of a long, hot day, we sit on our hotel balcony and watch the sun set over the Nile. It is a sight that never fails to awe and amaze us.

Posted by Richard Fazzini

How to Zookeep: Job Interview Basics

So I was tagged by @why-animals-do-the-thing in a post about what not to say in a job interview. It’s a bit overdue, but I figured this was a good opportunity to continue some of “How to Zookeep” and give y’all some insight on interviews. I’ve actually conducted quite a lot of interviews for an entry-level position. Here are just a few Do’s and Don’ts…

Originally posted by principessadesu

General Maybe Do’s:

  • Wear an outfit that looks pretty nice, but don’t go too formal. You should be able to get muddy or hop a fence - just in case. Most of the time you’ll know if it’s a true working interview, but some interviews will involve a tour, meeting an animal, or other situations where you might get messy.
  • Show that you’ve researched the facility and the position. This is especially true for phone interviews or if you’re not from the area. If you’ve ever visited the facility, mention that. Mention specific parts of the job description and why you’re interested or why you would excel at it. I know I always make a good note if candidates reference something on our website or from the job description because it lets me know they’ve done their homework. (One time a candidate quoted something verbatim and it was a little jarring only because I wrote that part of the website and it was strange to hear someone quote me).
  • If at all possible, have specific examples from your past experiences that you can talk about. These could be examples of training, working well with others, strengths & weaknesses, general animal care, etc. Try to be able to tell a story about when you worked around a training difficulty or resolved an issue with a coworker. And yes, have a real answer for “strengths and weaknesses”.
  • Try to use the most ‘updated’ zoo language you can. Zoo terminology changes so fast it’s hard to keep up. Try to use some of the research (website and job description) to see what kind of language this particular facility uses and attempt to mirror it. Examples are “in human care” instead of captivity or “habitat / enclosure” instead of cage/exhibit. It’s just a bonus way to make a good impression.

Originally posted by a-night-in-wonderland

General Maybe Don’ts:

  • Don’t get political. This is what @why-animals-do-the-thing was asked about - mentioning animal rights activist groups in the interview. Unless you are completely sure that it is specifically relevant to the position try not to get into any heavy areas of debate, any controversial news stories (think Harambe), or politically charged organizations like PETA, HSUS, etc. And even though you might think that everyone in the zoo world agrees that US politics are terrible for zoos/the environment or something along those lines, a job interview is not the time to mention it.
  • Don’t ask for tips about a specific facility on a public forum. It’s important to do research, but this one crosses a bit of a professional line. I would advise against going on any public forum (like the facebook groups You Know You’re a Zookeeper When and Zookreepers) and asking for interview advice about a certain facility. Most people won’t want to comment publicly about their facility as it can be seen as unprofessional and a lot of their coworkers will see it. Most of the time the research you need can be done on the website and with some googling, but if you feel you just need to talk to someone who works there, try flexing your networking muscle a bit.
  • Don’t say you love animals. This sounds contradictory but hear me out here - this job is about much more than loving animals. A lot of interviewers are used to hearing this answer or seeing it in cover letters of people who think that liking animals is all you have to do for a job. Yes, you love animals, we know that. But what do you love about working with them? Do you like enrichment, exhibit design, training? What do you love about the career of zookeeper / aquarist / etc? It’s important to go beyond the surface of just wanting to be around animals and go into the details of how you will improve their lives when you literally have their lives in your hands. I’ve heard from a lot of interviewers that they’re tired of hearing about ‘passion’, they want to hear about action. They want to hear about cleaning, hard work, the real nitty-gritty of the job. This don’t also leads to a general tip (what if you don’t have examples of what you like yet?)

General Tips

Here’s a common problem: you’re applying for your first entry-level position and you don’t have any animal experience yet. What do you talk about? Here’s some ideas:

  • Academic research or fieldwork - did you go on birding trips? Did you do mist-netting? Have you worked in a lab that uses live animals? Those things can be beginner animal experience.
  • Volunteering - zoos, vet clinics, etc.
  • Formal domestic animal experience - even if it’s not with exotic animals, the basics of caring for small domestics (cats, dogs, rodents, fish, etc.) in a formal setting (vet, pet store, rescue) has some aspects that apply in zoos, such as restraint and medical care.
  • Personal pets (very carefully) - It’s not that personal pet experience isn’t helpful when you’re just starting out, but sometimes newer keepers come in with an idea that their pet experience is on the same level as caring for animals in a formal career setting. It is not. Caring for your own animal in your own home is VERY different from caring for it in a zoo, aquarium, vet’s office, etc. In a formal setting, there are legal guidelines to follow, teams of people to communicate with about animal care, and lots of formality/red tape that doesn’t exist in a home setting. Pets can be useful as examples in interviews if it is relevant (medicating, enrichment, restraint) but they are almost never seen as an actual qualification. Side note, please don’t list personal pet care on a resume. 

Overall in an interview, you want to try to be as collected and confident as possible. BUT if you get nervous and you’re really struggling, just tell us! It’s better to just laugh a bit and say sorry, I’m nervous, than to completely freeze up. I have done plenty of interviews where the person is nervous and that’s okay. I’ve hired people who were nervous or misspoke in their interview.

If you have any other questions, feel free to drop me a line. I’ve interviewed and hired people for just three years now, so I may not be particularly seasoned, but I can lend a little of my expertise.

THE LIST

My “Read Around the World” project is essentially my wish to read more than just typically published American authors. I want to read books by people from different parts of the world, who have emigrated from other nations, or who have heritage from other countries in the world. Originally, the project was only going to include books in translation, but due to inadequate funds and resources, I’ve opened criteria and focused more on the concept “read more diversely”. While maybe not entirely accurate in name, I’m very excited to start my Read Around the World project, which focuses on 80 recognized UN nations! 

So, without further ado, for anyone with an interest in what I’ll be reading or looking for some recommendations, my list: 

  1.  Afghanistan: The Pearl that Broke it’s Shell by Nadia Hashimi
  2. Algeria: The Lovers of Algeria by Anouar Benmalek
  3. Argentina: Purgatory by Tomás Eloy Martínez
  4. Australia: Cloudstreet by Tim Winton
  5. Austria: The Reluctant Empress by Brigitte Hamann
  6. Bangladesh: A Golden Age by Tahmima Anam
  7. Belarus: A Factory of Tears by Valzhyna Mort
  8. Belgium: The Life of Hunger by Amélie Nothomb
  9. Brazil: Don Casmurro by Machado de Assis
  10. Bulgaria: Bai Ganyo: Incredible Tales of a Modern Bulgarian by Aleko Konstantinov
  11. Cambodia: Never Fall Down by Patricia Cormack
  12. Canada: Lives of Girls and Women by Alice Munro
  13. Chile: The House of Spirits by Isabelle Allende
  14. China: The Kitchen God’s Wife by Amy Tan
  15. Colombia: One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez
  16. Costa Rica: Costa Rica: A Traveler’s Literary Companion by Barbara Ras
  17. Croatia: The Ministry of Pain by Dubravka Ugrešić
  18. Cuba: Before Night Falls: A Memoir by Reinaldo Arenas
  19. Czech Republic: The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera
  20. Denmark: The Exception by Christian Jungersen
  21. Dominican Republic: In the Time of Butterflies by Julia Alvarez
  22. Ecuador: The Queen of Water by Laura Resau and María Virginia Farinango
  23. Egypt: The Palace Walk: The Cairo Trilogy by Naguib Mahfouz
  24. Finland: The Year of the Hare by Arto Paasilinna
  25. France: The Confidant by Hélène Grémillon
  26. Georgia: One More Year by Sana Krasikov
  27. Germany: Every Man Dies Alone by Hans Fallada
  28. Ghana: Changes: A Love Story by Ama Ata Aidoo
  29. Greece: Freedom or Death by Nikos Kazantzakis
  30. Haiti: The Farming of Bones by Edwidge Danticat
  31. Hungary: Metropole by Ferenc Karinthy
  32. Iceland: Independent People by Halldór Laxness
  33. India: A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
  34. Indonesia: The Rainbow Troops by Andrea Hirata
  35. Iran: The Blood of Flowers by Anita Amirrezvani
  36. Iraq: Nostalgia, My Enemy by Saadi Youssef
  37. Ireland: The Secret Scripture by Sebastian Barry
  38. Israel: A Tale of Love and Darkness by Amos Oz
  39. Italy: My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante
  40. Jamaica: The Book of Night Women by Marlon James
  41. Japan: The Street of a Thousand Blossoms by Gail Tsukiyama
  42. Kenya: Petals of Blood by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o
  43. Latvia: The Earth is Singing by Vaness Curtis
  44. Lebanon: June Rain by Jabbour Douaihy
  45. Lithuania: Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys
  46. Libya: In the Country of Men by Hisham Matar
  47. Malaysia: The Gift of Rain by Tan Twan Eng
  48. Malta: Death in Malta by Rosanne Dingli
  49. Mexico: Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel
  50. Morocco: Dreams of Trespass: Tales of a Harem Girlhood by Fatema Mernissi
  51. Mozambique: Sleepwalking Land by Mia Couto
  52. Nepal: Arresting God in Kathmandu by Samrat Upadhyay
  53. Netherlands: In Lucia’s Eyes by Arthur Japin
  54. New Zealand: The Bone People by Keri Hulme
  55. Nigeria: Half a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
  56. North Korea: The Girl with Seven Names by Hyeonseo Lee
  57. Norway: A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen
  58. Pakistan: I am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai
  59. Peru: The Time of the Hero by Mario Vargas Llosa
  60. Philippines: Noli Me Tangere by José Rizal
  61. Poland: This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen by Tadeusz Borowski
  62. Portugal: Blindness by José Saramago
  63. Romania: The Land of Green Plums by Herta Muller
  64. Russia: Queen of Spades and Other Stories by Alexander Pushkin
  65. Rwanda: We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow  We Will Be Killed with Our Families by Philip Gourevitch
  66. Saudi Arabia: Cities of Salt by Abdul Raman Munif
  67. Slovakia: The House of the Deaf Man by Peter Krištúfek
  68. South Africa: The Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela
  69. South Korea: Please Look After Mom by Kyung-Sook Shin
  70. Spain: The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
  71. Sri Lanka: Island of a Thousand Mirrors by Nayomi Munaweera
  72. Sweden: The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson
  73. Switzerland: Small World by Martin Suter
  74. Syria: In Praise of Hatred by Khaled Khalifa
  75. Turkey: The Bastard of Istanbul by Elif Shafak
  76. Uganda: Tropical Fish: Tales from Entebbe by Doreen Baingana
  77. Ukraine: Fieldwork in Ukrainian Sex by Oksana Zabuzhko
  78. Uruguay: Open Veins in Latin America: Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent by Eduardo Galeano
  79. Vietnam: The Sorrow of War by Bảo Ninh
  80. Zimbabwe: When a Crocodile Eats the Sun by Peter Godwin
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The Sounds of Indigenous Language Revitalization - the LSA plenary talk by Colleen Fitzgerald is now online in full

Today’s boy: yellow over metal, orange over yellow. He was on a territory where two females were fighting on and off for half an hour! Maybe he’s a two-timer…

He was also covered in flat flies, so either he’s a low-quality male or is so hopped up on testosterone that he doesn’t wash. Either way… Be better, buddy. Be better for your wife– or wives.

theguardian.com
Receding glacier causes immense Canadian river to vanish in four days
A statistical analysis, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, suggests that the dramatic changes can almost certainly be attributed to anthropogenic climate change. The calculations put chance of the piracy having occured due to natural variability at 0.5%. “So it’s 99.5% that it occurred due to warming over the industrial era,” said Best.
By Hannah Devlin

An immense river that flowed from one of Canada’s largest glaciers vanished over the course of four days last year, scientists have reported, in an unsettling illustration of how global warming dramatically changes the world’s geography.

The abrupt and unexpected disappearance of the Slims river, which spanned up to 150 metres at its widest points, is the first observed case of “river piracy”, in which the flow of one river is suddenly diverted into another.

For hundreds of years, the Slims carried meltwater northwards from the vast Kaskawulsh glacier in Canada’s Yukon territory into the Kluane river, then into the Yukon river towards the Bering Sea. But in spring 2016, a period of intense melting of the glacier meant the drainage gradient was tipped in favour of a second river, redirecting the meltwater to the Gulf of Alaska, thousands of miles from its original destination.

The continental-scale rearrangement was documented by a team of scientists who had been monitoring the incremental retreat of the glacier for years. But on a 2016 fieldwork expedition they were confronted with a landscape that had been radically transformed.

Continue Reading.

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Near the head of a landslide complex on Cape Meares in Oregon. A road runs across this slide area, and each time it moved downslope it was rebuilt, leading to layering of asphalt and gravel in some of the hummocks. Pavement fragments are found for about 50 meters downslope. Alder trees are the fastest to grow, so they cover more recent slide areas and fewer evergreens are found in these areas.

Paper Cut (Percival x Reader)

A/N: Hi!! Wow I haven’t written a Percival one for so long but I mean I only written one before so yeah haha anyways, I hope it’s alright. I got excited writing this because I love Graves and it’s just nice to write something a bit different haha😊 Enjoy!!

Request: if you’re still asking for requests, could you write a percival graves one where you get hurt and hide it from him but he finds out and gets angry but then it’s just really fluffy?? i’m a sucker for fluff and i need more graves x reader stuff. please and thank you ! 😊❤️


You entered the building, wincing slightly at the wound at your side, ignoring the pain as you headed up to your office, needing to do some paper work for the case you just solved involving wizards using the dark arts. You had gotten into a fight with those dark wizards and one of them managed to get you on your side.

Sighing, you sat down at your seat, pressing against your injured side to see how bad it was, jerking your hand away as you felt the pain shoot through even though you weren’t pressing that hard. You took in a deep breath before sorting and filling up anything necessary for the paper work.

When you were done, you grabbed the folder and headed straight to your superior’s office. Knocking on the door, you waited for him to ask you to enter before walking in.

“Good morning, Mr. Graves, I’ve finished the paper work for the case I worked on yesterday,” you greeted, looking at the man sitting behind a desk, signing some papers. He looked up at you passed him the file.

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