field. harvest

five places to die

5. a ditch

style, charisma, slightly damp and classically British, does lack some nuance 7/10

4. a dark forest

steamy, the erotic deteriorating leaf experience you’re looking for, somewhat edging on overdone, 6.9/10

3. a nondescript parking lot

woof, chills, this is the oblique whiskey-drenched obituary you want going for you, elegant and yet robust, 9/10

2. an open field during the harvest moon

almost a little too romantic, but this is still the farmer down-home boy experience that will leave your neighbors wondering if you were a witch, 8/10

1.  The bottom of a dry swimming pool during summer

original enough to be fun, and recommended for those who want a more oblique experience, an abandoned neighborhood or church is ideal, 8.5/10

4

I’ve driven by this little unknowable island of hay nestled each year in a seemingly random pattern within the wheat. I can’t make any sense of how they arrived here but the pattern is almost the same every year and finally seeing it from above it’s quite a work of art. 

i’m moving really slowly these days. dwelling a bit more. trying to soak in the last light. 

I made this for a friend who was trying to roll for a Lucina. Unfortunately I didn’t complete it in time and they only received duplicates and 3star heroes… But the power of these Lucinas cannot be denied forever!

The next time you roll for a specific Hero, remember that these Lucinas are praying for you!

A few little things to do for the Autumn Equinox

🍁 Bake apples filled with butter and cinnamon.

🍁 Craft decorations for your front door out of colored leaves, pine cones, nuts and acorns.

🍁 Honor the birds and small animals in the wilderness or by your home by making a bird feeder filled with seeds and grain.

🍁 Fill a basket with pine cones, fruits, colorful dried leaves, wheat, acorns, and fallen pine branches and leave it by your altar or door.

🍁 Make some Mabon soup using carrots, onions, potatoes, radishes, corn, pumpkins and other autumn vegetables.

🍁 Have a home cooked meal with a group of friends and loved ones to celebrate the abundance of the season.

🍁 Scatter offerings in harvested fields.

🍁 Do a thanksgiving circle, offering thanks as you face each direction:

For home, finances, and physical health face North
For gifts of knowledge face East
For accomplishments in career and hobbies face South
For relationships face West
For spiritual insights and messages the Center.

🍁 Make wine.

🍁 Make a dried flowers/leaves mobile. ( I’m currently working on this and I can’t wait to show you when it’s finished)

🍁 Take a walk through nature and spend time appreciating your surroundings.

🍁 Decrorate your home/room with autumn themed things, candles that smell like autumn, flowers of bright orange and yellow, tartan throws and pillows, fairy lights and orange/yellow/red crystals, autumn wreaths etc.

🍁 Meditate.

🍁 Spend time with people that bring a positive engery into your life.

🍁 Make magic apple cider.

Holidays: Mabon!

Since Mabon is coming up soon, I figured I’d make a beginners approach to the holidays starting with the closest. I, myself, have not celebrated it before being so new to Wicca/witchcraft, however, I’m excited for what is to come.

Firstly, the holiday usually falls around September 21st to the 23rd. It comes with the Autumnal Equinox. This year it falls on Friday September 22nd. It is a time to reap and harvest the seeds you have sown during the last year (figuratively and literally). It is time to finish old business and ready ourselves for a time of rest, relaxation, and reflection. It is a time of balance and mysteries. It is also a time when it’s perfectly okay to wear your most extravagant clothes and celebrate as lavishly as you wish. (I personally plan on dressing up, staying home, and cooking some good food). 

The symbolism: Second Harvest, the Mysteries, Equality and Balance

Symbols of Mabon: wine, gourds, pine cones, acorns, grains, corn, apples, pomegranates, vines such as ivy, dried seems, and horns of plenty

Herbs of Mabon: acorns, benzoin, ferns, grains, honeysuckle, marigold, milkweed, myrrh, passionflower, rose, sage, solomon’s seal, tobacco, thistle, and vegetables

Foods of Mabon: breads, nuts, apples, pomegranates, and vegetables such as carrots and onions

Incense of Mabon: Autumn blend-benzoin, myrrh, and sage

Colors of Mabon: red, orange, russet, maroon, brown, and gold

Stones of Mabon: sapphire, lapis lazuli, and yellow agates

Activities of Mabon: making wine, gathering dried herbs, plants, seeds and see pods, walking in the woods, scattering offerings in harvested fields, offering libations to trees, adorning burial sites with leaves, acorns, and pine cones to honor those who have passed

Spell working of Mabon: protection, prosperity, security, and self-confidence, also those of harmony and balance

Dieties of Mabon: Goddesses- Madron, Morgan, Epona, Persephone, Pamona and the Muses; Gods- Mabon, Thoth, Thor, Hermes, and The Green Man

And there you go! All the essential info about Mabon. Go forth and celebrate! Feel free to tell me how you plan on celebrating/if you’re celebrating.

Vincent van Gogh
Detail of Wheat Field with a Lark 
1887
Oil on canvas
1’ 9" x 2’ 2"

In 1887, while Vincent van Gogh was residing in Paris, he executed an oil painting commonly known as Wheat Field with a Lark. The center part shows a partially harvested field of wheat under a sky patterned with light clouds, the bird flying over, and possibly out of the field. 

Mabon - A Small Guide

This week is Mabon! For all Witches, and with any sabbath, it’s a fun time to celebrate. So, I figured I’d put together a little guide for Mabon.

Mabon is also known as the Autumnal Equinox, when Night and Day are equal with each other. With Mabon, we all take a moment to pay our respects to the impending darkness. The Druids call this celebration, Mea'n Fo'mhair, and honor the The Green Man, the God of the Forest, by offering libations to trees. Offerings of ciders, wines, herbs and fertilizer are appropriate at this time. Wiccans celebrate the aging Goddess as she passes from Mother to Crone, and her consort the God as he prepares for death and re-birth.

At this festival it is appropriate to wear all of your finery and dine and celebrate in a lavish setting. It is the drawing to and of family as we prepare for the winding down of the year at Samhain. It is a time to finish old business as we ready for a period of rest, relaxation, and reflection.


Symbolism of Mabon:
Second Harvest, the Mysteries, Equality and Balance.

Symbols of Mabon:
wine, gourds, pine cones, acorns, grains, corn, apples, pomegranates, vines such as ivy, dried seeds, and horns of plenty.

Herbs of Maybon:
Acorn, benzoin, ferns, grains, honeysuckle, marigold, milkweed, myrrh, passionflower, rose, sage, solomon’s seal, tobacco, thistle, and vegetables.

Foods of Mabon:
Breads, nuts, apples, pomegranates, and vegetables such as potatoes, carrots, and onions.

Incense of Mabon:
Autumn Blend-benzoin, myrrh, and sage.

Colors of Mabon:
Red, orange, russet, maroon, brown, and gold.

Stones of Mabon:
Sapphire, lapis lazuli, and yellow agates.

Activities of Mabon:
Making wine, gathering dried herbs, plants, seeds and seed pods, walking in the woods, scattering offerings in harvested fields, offering libations to trees, adorning burial sites with leaves, acorns, and pine cones to honor those who have passed over.

Spellworkings of Mabon:
Protection, prosperity, security, and self-confidence. Also those of harmony and balance.

Deities of Mabon:
Goddesses-Modron, Morgan, Epona, Persephone, Pamona and the Muses. Gods-Mabon, Thoth, Thor, Hermes, and The Green Man.

Mabon is considered a time of the Mysteries. It is a time to honor Aging Deities and the Spirit World. Considered a time of balance, it is when we stop and relax and enjoy the fruits of our personal harvests, whether they be from toiling in our gardens, working at our jobs, raising our families, or just coping with the hussle-bussle of everyday life. May your Mabon be memorable, and your hearts and spirits be filled to overflowing!

flickr

Auchmacoy Doocot (Dovecot) at sunset by Ian Cowe
Via Flickr:
The Dovecot (or Doocot) dates from 1638. In past times pigeons were often bred on large estates for food.  It’s a prominent landmark visible from the busy main road traffic heading north from Ellon towards Peterhead / Fraserburgh