field. harvest

ragingwerewolfdude  asked:

Fluff piece, Nick and Judy relaxing in a hammock. You know the pic

I, for some reason, am remember a few hammock pic, whist also remember like very few of them.  So I’m basing this prompt of this pic

—-

Nick likes visiting Bunnyburrow.

Which was not a sentence Nick ever thought would be true in his whole life.  As he is a fox, and never once been far outside the city limits of Zootopia.

But it was true.  

He liked visiting Bunnyburrow.  It had wide open fields and sweeping breezes that Zootopia could ever dream of having.  Not to mention the air was fresh, smelled more of flowering plants and dirt with hints of fresh cut grass.  Rather than smelling like car exhausted and every type of mammal imaginable.

Nick doesn’t even care that when he visit he sometimes has to help with farm work.  Wither it be tending to the fields, harvesting fresh produce, or working the Hopps roadside stand.  He really doesn’t care.  

Usually because Judy is right along side him.  And it’s just a whole other side of her he doesn’t have in the city.  It’s softer, gentler, and calmer.  Granted that doesn’t stop her from chasing and tackling some of her siblings, but still.

It was fun.  And the Hopps understood it was still part of a vacation for them.  They were still guests to be entertained rather worked too hard.

Still, there was nothing better than working in the fields all day then lounging in the hammock next to the blueberry bushes as the sun set.  Even if the hammock was just slightly small for him.

Which was where Nick currently was.

Lounging away until the dinner bell chattered loudly through the air.  Content with breathing the fresh air and swaying slightly in whatever breezy decided to give him a bit of push.

“What are you doing?”  Judy’s voice suddenly asked.

Nick popped open an eye and turned to look at the rabbit.

She dressed in her usual plaid and faded jeans she always seemed to produce whenever they visited. She was wearing a large brimmed straw hat she burrowed from her mother, or one of her sisters.  The gray furred doe was blinking at him with her paws on her hips as she stared down at the fox in the hammock.

“Relaxing before dinner,”  Nick answered easily.

“You’re too big for the hammock.”  Judy grinned out.

“Still comfortable.”  Nick returned, turning back to the sky and closing his eyes again.

A moment passed, and nothing.  The fox didn’t hear the rabbit moved away or anything.  She simply sighed, Nick could tell she was shaking her head at him. Then he heard her feet in the grass, and the hammock dip slightly as she grabbed it.

Before he knew it, she was climbing on top of the hammock.  Well mostly, onto Nick and a little on the hammock.  Nick grinned as he felt her carefully climbed onto his torso, and straddle his waist a bit.  The hammock was maybe sized for two rabbits to cuddle up into, but with a fox it left very little room for another party.  She cuddled up under his chin easily and let out a content sigh.

“Don’t get too comfortable,”  Nick said with a light teasing tone.  “What would your father say if he saw us?”

“Don’t break the hammock.”  Judy returned with another content nuzzle into his chest.  He could tell she had her eyes closed as she laid on him.

Nick grinned, opening his eyes and shifting to get a bit of look at the doe snuggled up against him. “That sounds way dirtier than it should.”  He chuckled lightly.  Lying a paw over the small of her back.  “Especially come from a rabbit.”

“Nick.”  Judy started simply.  She paused, waiting for a response, when Nick gave her in a hum.  “Shut up.”

And Nick did.

—-

AN: Again, I don’t know.  Let’s just always assume I don’t know!

I made this for a friend who was trying to roll for a Lucina. Unfortunately I didn’t complete it in time and they only received duplicates and 3star heroes… But the power of these Lucinas cannot be denied forever!

The next time you roll for a specific Hero, remember that these Lucinas are praying for you!

Vincent van Gogh
Detail of Wheat Field with a Lark 
1887
Oil on canvas
1’ 9" x 2’ 2"

In 1887, while Vincent van Gogh was residing in Paris, he executed an oil painting commonly known as Wheat Field with a Lark. The center part shows a partially harvested field of wheat under a sky patterned with light clouds, the bird flying over, and possibly out of the field. 

instagram

Drone exploration of wheat farming in Kansas

flickr

Untitled by Gabriela Tulian
Via Flickr:

sanjo-the-deceased-42069  asked:

Ya got any more dirt on typhlosions?

Typhlosion, according to old Johto folklore, are representatives of the gods of autumn. The Pokémon’s pale bellies represent the fading light. Their dark backs represent the growing night. The fiery collars represent the bonfires that are usually lit in fields after harvest (many farmers would leave the dry stalks in the field, which would often be burnt). Treating one respectfully would lead to a long autumn and short winter, but if one felt slighted, it would report to its deities, who would punish the ingrates with cold snaps and poor harvests.

anonymous asked:

Okay so I'm gay and I'm all for equality & do my best to be open minded & respectful, but sometimes I catch myself not being so. Like sometimes I struggle understanding trans rights, even though I'm gay?! And sometimes I fall victim to the thinking of conservatives. Like we accuse conservatives of being close minded for not supporting LGBT rights, when liberals don't accept conservative views Ike being pro life... I don't know I just think it's hypocritical of liberals..

Ok so, not gonna lie, reading this was not fun. That being said, I sorta have this rule where if someone asks me a question, even if it’s problematic, I try my best to just answer calmly, hoping that if you’re asking a question it’s because you’re open to new ideas that might hopefully replace your existing ones.

Soooooo lets get started.

1. One of the biggest hurdles for the trans community is in fact the gay community, you expressing some sort of surprise that you, presumably a gay man, can at times feel transphobic would probably not come as any surprise to an actual trans person who has to deal with this all the time. Probably definitely saddens them, but not exactly surprising. I mean, the gay community by and large can still be very hostile towards trans people and some gay people will even casually shit all over trans people as a way of engendering themselves to conservatives as the Cool Gay. “Sure, I’m gay, but I’m not one of those liberal hippy gays, I believe in a gender binary, look at me and how much we have in common!” The thing is, yes, being a cis gay person makes it sometimes very hard to exactly understand what the experiences of a trans person are. The notion of feeling uneasy about ones gender, which for most of us is an aspect of our identity we just take for granted and don’t think about, is probably very alien to most cis people, even gay ones. However, you don’t really need to have an intimate understanding of every issue to simply respect that persons ability to lead a life that they feel reflects their most authentic self. At the end of the day, even if you’re someone who can never understand specifically what it feels like not be comfortable with your own gender, you can still hopefully understand that it’s not really your business to regulate other people’s lives. Conservative arguments about gender revolve around bathrooms - essentially making it impossible for trans people to work in a public building or even go out because once they leave their house they don’t have a bathroom to use. Their reasoning is the safety of others, specifically women and children, which is insane because there’s never been a single instance of a trans person attacking anyone in a bathroom and this whole argument is rooted in the same kind of bigotry that led people to characterize gay men as pedophiles for fucking years. So, I’m not really sure what about the conservative argument makes sense to you, personally I don’t see what right people have to regulate the private personal decisions of other citizens.

2. Next, women’s reproductive rights. Ok, so, the big problem here is pretty obvious just by the way you phrased your question, which was that you seem to view women’s access to their own reproductive rights as like this abstract argument. Sorta like, what should our tax rate be? 30% or 25%…. lets debate the merits of both sides and find out. The thing is, reproductive rights aren’t abstract. They may seem that way to men, even gay men, because men have no concept of how essential these rights are for women since our government at no point has ever regulated our lives and our bodies in order to trap us within certain moral norms.

But yeah, lets break this down a little. Why are reproductive rights so important to conservative ideology? Well, it’s actually not the Christian thing, since Christianity was completely silent on abortion throughout history until we began entering the industrial era. Why the change? Well because the shift from a pre to a post-industrial economy meant having tons of children was not feasible for most people anymore. Prior to industrialization if you wanted to lead a successful life you had to have children, lots of them, because children tended the fields, brought in the harvest, fed your animals, and the fact that kids didn’t always reach adulthood meant you had extra for just in case. Moreover, the industrial revolution made it very hard for families to survive one just one partners income, especially if you had more than just a couple kids. So what happens? Two things - women start going to work to help their families and they also start having abortions with much greater frequency because they literally could not afford these kids anymore. Now, why is this such an issue? Well because society up until this point was heavily invested in the idea of female domesticity, which was essentially a religious fable created by men that said women were the moral center of every family, which is why it was their jobs to raise the children and also to guide their husbands moral decisions. However, the only way women could stay pure enough to maintain this role was by not leaving the house, the public sphere was an ugly immoral place where people had to sell their virtues to get ahead and it was thought that if women were allowed to enter that world then morality as a whole would decay. It’s all bullshit, of course, but it was a very effective way of giving women the illusion of agency and influence while still keeping them locked up in their home. Plus, the fact that women were forced to believe that they were the pillars of morality created a sense of duty for them to stay with their husbands and fulfill their role. POINT IS, ok, so now women are leaving their homes, how do we fix that? Oh, right, lets make it fucking impossible for women to work or have careers by taking away their agency to make decisions about their own lives. Like, oh, you don’t want this fourth baby because it’ll prevent you from being able to have a job and your family will suffer as a consequence? Too bad! Sucks to suck #awomansplace. All that said, did any anti-abortion regulations ever actually stop abortions? NO. Women were still having abortions, the only difference was that they were having them in alley ways and butcher shops. They were getting sick from an infection or a botched surgery and dying and for what?? To have the same sort of basic agency and free will to determine the circumstances of their lives that men have always had as a given and take for granted.

Reproductive rights is essential to every other aspect of a woman’s life. It determines what level of education they can get, what their income could be, what sort of personal freedom they’ll have to go on vacation, or date, or just have a night out with friends, and sometimes it even determines whether they’ll live or die. And that’s what conservatives want. They want to use women’s reproductive biology as a tool to subjugate them and make them less independent, it’s a way of exercising patriarchal control over women by making those women dependent on either a man or government assistance just to survive financially. So, yeah, the lives of women aren’t simply an abstract idea you toss around, debating the pros and cons of, as if it’s all the same.

Call it hypocritical if you want, but I think that’s an awful mischaracterization of things because at no point in time are liberals ever trying to control or regulate a private aspects of a conservatives life. I think liberal ideology is about being accepting of whatever personal choices people make as long as those choices don’t have a direct negative impact on another persons happiness or freedom. It doesn’t mean accept anything without question. If a person wants to impose control on another individual then no, we won’t accept that, because people should not get to build their political ideology based on their ability to exert control into other people’s lives.

ANYWAYS, this has been super long and it honestly doesn’t even cover half of the complexities of these issues so I hope you’ll do your own research and keep thinking about these topics while also remembering that as a cis male your ability to actually understand the experience of others is limited, but that doesn’t mean you can’t educate yourself and try to empathize with those that are different than yourself and imagine how you’d feel if you were trapped in their circumstances.

Seven fields

1. There is an old god of mud who sleeps beneath the footpath across the valley. You would not know it, most of the time. Only when the Spring comes and his long feet thaw beneath the far stile, that time when he is sometimes prone to roll over or snore. Then you get great bubbly puddles in the mud, the sort that children idly jump in and find themselves submerged to the waist.

2. Close to the edge of the forest, there is a field that grows something purple. And you can try and find the owner of the field if you want, but there is a tight and tangled maze of bureaucracy to go through and it spits you back out at the start when you think you have it solved. Meanwhile the field gets harvested on Midsummer night. For a month or so the stumps ooze glittery juice, and then up come the purple leaves again, whispering anonymously as they grow.

3. It is hard to cross the field above the railway line. Maybe because of the mud, or the brambles that have long since cloaked the footpath, or the swarms of biting flies. I have not seen anyone cross it in five years, and only the sheep know about the scar through the field’s centre, where the mud parts into broken rock and through it you can see dark, dry depths.

4. Where the five fields come together on the hill there is a little extra one, a secret field ten metres across that you cannot see from any road. There are four apple trees there. The apples are small, and hard, and brown, and the magpies go at them in a frenzy in the Autumn so that there are none left at the harvest. But every so often a traveller comes from the city and picks a few to take away before the birds have at them.

5. The long-grass field round behind the wood. There is a circle in the centre where the cows will not go and the weeds grow long and tangled. Under the cow parsley there are the stumps of seven old stones. They say there was a tomb here once, and then it became a cowshed, and now it is scattered rubble.

6. I know also of a field by the North road that is in the shape of a spiral. You would not think it to look at it. But it is oddly difficult to approach the old oak in the centre by the direct route. And if you approach it obliquely, spiral-wise, you get the sense that you are slipping deeper, going further perhaps than you should; making a journey from which it may be hard to come back. There are crows in the tree, but I do not know how they made it there. Maybe they come from some other place.

7. There is a field beneath the town, a field that was ploughed by a white horse and a black one, and the black horse was the white horse’s shadow on the moonlit river that had somehow been pulled up into the world of men. Those horses could never be parted. In death they walked the field’s edges together, even though the field was soon gone. You can see them, sometimes, passing through the back room at the hairdressers’, or crossing the high street below the traffic lights. They are waiting for the sea to rise, to sink them both back below the water. They are patient and will not have to wait much longer.