The toughest thing to explain to people is that weird place where chronic fatigue and brain fog intersect; where you’re so far gone that physical and mental energy are both being drawn from the same well, and the well is dry. When you’ve been on your feet and your muscles are screaming they can’t do anymore, and someone asks you a question and it’s more than you can muster to even open your mouth and make a sound. When critical thinking is the same as running a marathon and you can’t remember what you’re doing so you walk into a wall. It all just blends together until your brain and your body both feel like useless mush.

Made by www.organize-ability.tumblr.com

[Batteries in various stages of power against yellow background. Title text: “Effects of Social Events on Spoonies.” Battery 1 is ¾ full with caption: “Getting ready.” Battery 2 is ½ full with caption: “Travel to event.” Battery 3 is ¼ full with caption: “1-3 hours at event.” Battery 4 is empty with caption: “Travel home.”]

scenes from a bad brainfog week
  • me: *holds toothbrush under hand soap pump*
  • me:
  • me: something's wrong here
  • me:
  • me:
  • me:
  • me: oh
  • * * * * * * * * *
  • me: I just need my....
  • me: um
  • me:
  • me:
  • me:
  • me:
  • me: .....kkkkeeeyyyys. yes.
  • me: *walks into another room*
  • me:
  • me: what was I looking for?
  • * * * * * * * * *
  • me: *misjudges somewhat narrow space*
  • me: *hip bounces off wall*
  • me: *body slams into another wall*
  • me: oh
  • me: *stubs toe on something*

I don’t think that abled bodied people appreciate how a shower can be relaxing and refreshing for them.

I can’t remember the last time showering felt like that for me.

I takes so much energy to shower and I often dread showering because I know how exhausting it will make me feel during and afterwards.

That’s one thing I really hate about my chronic illness.

It’s little things like having a refreshing shower that have been taken away from me that I miss.