fiber artisan

Instagram: @the_artisan_bell

Socks finished! Also my new needles have arrived, the only thing I don’t like is the plastic case the come in.
I will be leaving socks aside for a while, I’m planning some new beanies and mittens designs… 

I think more artisans should be like Ron Swanson

–Stay out of drama. Who cares what kind of yarn you use? What does it matter if your stripes aren’t perfectly even and matched? Do what you want with your craft and stay out of crafter drama. 

–Don’t have too many WIPs. Never half ass two things. Whole ass one thing. 

–Take pride in your work, but also be proud of the hard work of others in your field. Ron fanboyed hard about other woodworkers and praises other craftspeople 

–Work hard every day. Ron makes chairs, bed, canoes, harps. he’s always working. 

–Have a quality workplace. Ron’s workroom is only for his work. There’s never any business, never a lot of people. Just Ron working on his craft. 

–Don’t mass produce. Ron’s work is special because it’s handmade. If it was outsourced or if  a bunch of other people worked on it, it wouldn’t be unique. And you don’t have to sell everything and make things for everyone all the time. Ron makes something because it is beautiful and useful. Not because someone offered him money.

–Make things for your friends and don’t overcharge them. Leslie bought the wood for her stage and Ron built it for free. And Ron made Anne and Chris a Baby Carriage thing because they are his friends and had a baby.  

–Use your craft to barter. When Brandanwitz helped Ron get his shop up to code, Ron paid him with a canoe. 

–Eat well before, after, and during your work. Doesn’t have to be a steak from Mulligans. Or fancy whiskey. Water and snacks is fine. 

–Do not let your children (fur or human) have store bought crap. When Ron and Diane were having a baby, Ron made a crib. He didn’t buy some crap from the store, he used his amazing skill to make a powerful strong crib that could be used for multiple children and multiple generation. Sweaters, slippies, dresses, etc. Make what you can. 

Feel free to add your own Ron Swanson inspired advice! 

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Something about presentation of the collection “Walking The World” by Haiku Sarti at Paris Shop last night

Haiku Sarti is a project about clothing, music, and the visual arts. All the garments are made in a limited number of multiples with natural noble fibers and artisan methods.

Salman Raheel a designer whose creative path led him through industrial design and global manufacturing before dedicating himself to making objects by hand. The heart of this interests has to do with the principle of beauty and with creativity in the way we live in this world.

Mariam / Maria Grazia Sebastianelli a scholar of Aesthetics with Professor Emilio Garroni, she has always been involved in the visual arts. Her intellectual and professional character is permeated by a vivid conceptual bent recognizable in her experience in the communication, ideation and production of events of cultural and artistic scope, and currently, in her work on garments made by hand.

Made by hand, one by one

INNER WORKINGS: HAKUHO-DO + SEPHORA PRO BRUSH COLLECTION

We take you through the process of creating a luxurious new brush collection.

What happens when the best of two industries come together? Pure beauty magic. In this case, magic of the wand variety. The masters at Japanese calligraphy brush house, Hakuho-Do, have specially crafted a collection of elevated makeup tools with the Sephora PRO Team for the most dexterous application possible.

The hakuho-do + SEPHORA PRO Brush Collection includes five synthetic, yet amazingly cashmere-soft, brushes with bone-white bristles and crimson lacquer handles. In Japan, the color red carries deep significance—representing energy, heat, vitality, and power. Who doesn’t want all those positive vibes when creating their look of the day? And in honor of the country of origin, each brush is named after its shape in Japanese.

Settled in Kumano, Hiroshima, the Hakuho-Do factory has been producing fudes (the Japanese term for calligraphy brushes) for over a century, and currently houses sixth-generation craftsmen of the traditional art form—some of whom have over 40 years of experience under their belts. Of course, this detailed expertise comes with a unique, not-easily-replicated process that makes Hakuho-Do a visionary in the industry.

To manufacture these limited-edition brushes, the Hakuho-Do artisans undergo over 50 steps (all by hand!) to meticulously create top-of-line fudes.

Unlike other brush manufacturers, Hakuho-Do sorts through every hair fiber—made up of a never-before-seen patented blend normally only reserved for calligraphy tools—in order to weed out any considered less-than-premium quality. Once only the best of the fibers are left, artisans brush and shape each bristle head. After the ferrule is attached, each brush is washed and dried overnight to ensure minimum-to-no fibers fall out during application. Finally, the handles are dip-dyed, polished, and cleaned one by one.

Now, they’re ready for you to continue the artistry with your makeup application. The set is only available for a limited time, so add it to your collection for the ultimate beauty toolkit. JESSICA VELEZ

SHOP ALL THE SEPHORA COLLECTION HAKUHO-DO + SEPHORA PRO BRUSHES >