feminist-books

The BIG list of free Feminist / Gender / Audiobooks by Women via Audible.com

Updated 4/1/17: Here is a masterlist of feminist books and books by or about women and the LGBTQIA+ community that are available for free with a trial signup to Audible.com. Some sections still need filling out, as I update the list over the coming week I’ll reflect the current date at the top of the list!

Through a current promotion, you can sign up for a free trial, cancel within 30 days and you get to keep the two books forever! 

  • 30 days of membership free, plus two free audiobooks that are yours forever.
  • 1 credit a month after trial, good for any book regardless of price.
  • Exclusive members savings. Get 30% off any additional audiobooks.
  • Easy exchanges. Don’t love a book? Swap it for free, anytime. Seriously.

PLEASE REMEMBER: After 30 days it’s $14.95/month, so set yourself a calendar alert to cancel if you’re not interested in continuing. I don’t want anyone to get an unbudgeted $14.95 charge because they forgot to cancel!

Here’s the link: Audible Free Trial Digital Membership  

AVAILABLE AUDIOBOOKS (updated 4/1/17)

Feminist  Books

Margaret Atwood: The Handmaid’s Tale

Laura Bates: Everyday Sexism

Jessica Benett: Feminist Fight Club: An Office Survival Manual for a Sexist Workplace

Susan Brownmiller: Femininity

Annie E. Clark and Andrea L. Pino: We Believe You: Survivors of Campus Sexual Assault Speak Out

Kira Cochrane: All the Rebel Women: The Rise of the Fourth Wave of Feminism

Angela Y. Davis:  Freedom Is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine, and the Foundations of a Movement

Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering: The Hunting Ground: The Inside Story of Sexual Assault on American College Campuses

Nora Ephron: Crazy Salad and Scribble, Scribble: Some Things About Women and Notes on Media

Keep reading

5

Mad, bad, crazy and sad. Those are the labels given to trailblazing women throughout history who denied and defied the rigid roles society set for them—whether it was simply getting an education, breaking into male-dominated professions, ruling empires or fighting for the right to vote/human right/women’s rights/civil rights/the environment/ or lesbian gay bisexual transgender (LGBT) rights.

Here’s a list of books filled with profiles of notable women from ancient times to today and an essay compilation for teens and young adults on the current multifaceted feminist scene.

the world gives you so much pain,
and here you are making gold out of it.
there is nothing purer than that.
—  Milk and Honey
We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls, you can have ambition, but not too much. You should aim to be successful, but not too successful. Otherwise, you would threaten the man. Because I am female, I am expected to aspire to marriage. I am expected to make my life choices always keeping in mind that marriage is the most important. Now marriage can be a source of joy and love and mutual support but why do we teach girls to aspire to marriage and we don’t teach boys the same? We raise girls to see each other as competitors not for jobs or accomplishments, which I think can be a good thing, but for the attention of men. We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are. Feminist: a person who believes in the social, political, and economic equality of the sexes
—  Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
nytimes.com
Margaret Atwood on What ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Means in the Age of Trump
Atwood on whether her dystopian classic is meant as a “feminist” novel, as antireligion or as a prediction.
By Margaret Atwood

TW for sexual assault, gender violence

“Which brings me to three questions I am often asked.

First, is “The Handmaid’s Tale” a “feminist” novel? If you mean an ideological tract in which all women are angels and/or so victimized they are incapable of moral choice, no. If you mean a novel in which women are human beings - with all the variety of character and behavior that implies - and are also interesting and important, and what happens to them is crucial to the theme, structure and plot of the book, then yes. In that sense, many books are “feminist.”

Why interesting and important? Because women are interesting and important in real life. They are not an afterthought of nature, they are not secondary players in human destiny, and every society has always known that. Without women capable of giving birth, human populations would die out. That is why the mass rape and murder of women, girls and children has long been a feature of genocidal wars, and of other campaigns meant to subdue and exploit a population. Kill their babies and replace their babies with yours, as cats do; make women have babies they can’t afford to raise, or babies you will then remove from them for your own purposes, steal babies - it’s been a widespread, age-old motif. The control of women and babies has been a feature of every repressive regime on the planet. Napoleon and his “cannon fodder,” slavery and its ever-renewed human merchandise — they both fit in here. Of those promoting enforced childbirth, it should be asked: Cui bono? Who profits by it? Sometimes this sector, sometimes that. Never no one.”

Read the full essay by Margaret Atwood here

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

anonymous asked:

Gay people used to have their own bookstores and cafes but what happened was capitalism. Do you go to a local coffeeshop or do you get Starbucks? Do you buy your books from Amazon or Barnes&Noble instead of looking for a small business? This is why all those places disappeared. Most LGBT centers have gay choirs, though, they're just not skewed young to the queer community.

GOOD POINT ANON! There are few Gay Bookstores left, A LOT have gone out of business in the last few years. They all sell books, movies, gay flags, etc. and almost all of them are now combined with something else to survive: bookstore + coffee shop, bookstore + sex shop, bookstore + art shop, gay books + feminist/women’s books. Almost of all them have free dating nights, parties, book readings, book signings and other events where you can meet lesbian and gay people. Follow them on FB, IG and Twitter to keep up with their events. If you can’t actually go to any of these stores, please support them by ordering something from them online. We need to keep our places open! 

🇺🇸 United States 🇺🇸

Philly AIDS Thrift @ Giovanni’s Room > site
12th & Pine - Philadelphia, PA

Bureau of General Services - Queer Division (BGSQD) > site
208 W 13th St, Rm 210 (in The LGBT Centre) NYC, NY

Outwords Books, Gifts & Coffee > site
2710 N. Murray Ave - Milwaukee, WI

Charis Books and More > site
Moreland Ave NE & Euclide Ave NE - Atlanta, GA

Women & Children First > site
5233 N Clarke St - Chicago, IL

Common Language Bookstore > site
317 Braun Court - Ann Arbour, MI


🇨🇦 Canada 🇨🇦

Glad Day Bookstore > site
Church & Wellesley - Toronto, ON

Little Sisters Book & Art Emporium (and sex shop) > site
Davie & Jervis - Vancouver, BC


ADD YOUR LOCAL SHOP TO THIS LIST!!! 

Some people ask: ‘Why the word feminist? Why not just say you are a believer in human rights, or something like that?’ Because that would be dishonest. Feminism is, of course, part of human rights in general—but to choose to use the vague expression human rights is to deny the specific and particular problem of gender. It would be a way of pretending that it was not women who have, for centuries, been excluded. It would be a way of denying that the problem of gender targets women.
—  Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, We Should All Be Feminists
theguardian.com
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie on transgender row: 'I have nothing to apologise for'
Novelist and feminist has attracted criticism for her comments on trans women, but says hostility of backlash serves to ‘close up debate’
By David Smith

“I didn’t apologise because I don’t think I have anything to apologise for,” she said on Monday. “What’s interesting to me is this is in many ways about language and I think it also illustrates the less pleasant aspects of the American left, that there sometimes is a kind of language orthodoxy that you’re supposed to participate in, and when you don’t there’s a kind of backlash that gets very personal and very hostile and very closed to debate.

“Had I said, ‘a cis woman is a cis woman, and a trans woman is a trans woman’, I don’t think I would get all the crap that I’m getting, but that’s actually really what I was saying.

“But because ‘cis’ is not a part of my vocabulary – it just isn’t – it really becomes about language and the reason I find that troubling is to insist that you have to speak in a certain way and use certain expressions, otherwise we cannot have a conversation, can close up debate. And if we can’t have conversations, we can’t have progress.

I AM A FEMINIST

“Feminist: A person who believes in the social, political, and economic equality of all genders, regardless of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, religion, ability and sexual orientation.”

I am a feminist because I am too scared to walk alone at night.

I am a feminist because I got lined up in a classroom in order of who had the nicest arse, aged thirteen, by all the boys in the class.

I am a feminist because everyone asks me if I’m feeling OK on the days I don’t wear makeup.  

I am a feminist because a man I was managing was paid the same as me.

I am a feminist because every girl I know was sexually harassed before the age of sixteen.  

I am a feminist because women write insightful and beautiful books about relationships and they’re labelled chick lit. I am a feminist because men write insightful and beautiful books about relationships and get longlisted for the Booker prize.  

I am a feminist because 50% of the films nominated for Best Picture Academy Awards did not pass the simple Bechdel test.

I am a feminist because whenever I watch a movie, music video, or open a magazine, I feel instantly insecure about my body.

I am a feminist because my two-year-old niece pointed to a picture of a blue hat in a book and said, “Boy’s hat”.

I am a feminist because I am regularly interrupted by men whenever I dare to open my mouth.  

I am a feminist because when I do mixed-sex school visits, the girls never, ever put their hand up to ask a question. But, when it’s just girls, we usually have to leave extra time for questions.

I am a feminist because I feel I need to hide my tampon up my sleeve on the way to the toilet.

I am a feminist because teenage boys come up to me at events and ask if they’re “allowed” to read my books.

I am a feminist for all the boys I supported, working at a charity, who would rather harm themselves than cry.

I am a feminist because my wonderful, caring, brilliant feminist father has still never cleaned a toilet in his life.  

I am a feminist because this is only the tip of it. The tip of it in my privileged, first-world, pale-skinned, straight, fully-abled life.  

I am feminist for all the women for whom it is unimaginably harder than it is for me.

I am a feminist because I am angry and exhausted and terrified and frustrated and confused. And even though it’s so much harder to fight, so much easier to roll over, I am a feminist because… how can you not be a feminist?  

I am a feminist for all the things I’m damaged by that I don’t want to share here today.  

I am a feminist. And I’m not saying that to make you feel guilty and defensive. I’m not saying that because I think you’re a bad person. I’m not saying that because I hate half of the human population and want them all punished.  

I am saying that because I believe every human being should have an equal shot at a healthy and happy life, no matter what body they are born into. And that’s not going to happen unless we fight, unless we speak up, unless we occasionally make people feel uncomfortable, unless we – at the very freaking least – TRY.

That’s why #IAmAFeminist. Now, how about you?